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You searched for +publisher:"University of Adelaide" +contributor:("McColl, Shaun Reuss"). Showing records 1 – 12 of 12 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Haylock-Jacobs, Sarah. The role of class IA P13Kơ in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Degree: 2010, University of Adelaide

 Through its role in cells of haematopoietic origin, the class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) has a significant impact on both the cell-mediated and innate… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: P13-kinase; experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; EAE

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APA (6th Edition):

Haylock-Jacobs, S. (2010). The role of class IA P13Kơ in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/64588

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haylock-Jacobs, Sarah. “The role of class IA P13Kơ in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.” 2010. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/64588.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haylock-Jacobs, Sarah. “The role of class IA P13Kơ in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.” 2010. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Haylock-Jacobs S. The role of class IA P13Kơ in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2010. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/64588.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haylock-Jacobs S. The role of class IA P13Kơ in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/64588

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

2. Bunting, Mark Daniel. The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in thymocyte development and its influence on the link between innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of dendritic cell migration.

Degree: 2012, University of Adelaide

 The significance of chemokines in directing cell migration both during homeostasis and immune responses has been appreciated for some time. However, the mechanisms in place… (more)

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APA (6th Edition):

Bunting, M. D. (2012). The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in thymocyte development and its influence on the link between innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of dendritic cell migration. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/81780

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bunting, Mark Daniel. “The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in thymocyte development and its influence on the link between innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of dendritic cell migration.” 2012. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/81780.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bunting, Mark Daniel. “The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in thymocyte development and its influence on the link between innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of dendritic cell migration.” 2012. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Bunting MD. The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in thymocyte development and its influence on the link between innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of dendritic cell migration. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/81780.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bunting MD. The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in thymocyte development and its influence on the link between innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of dendritic cell migration. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/81780

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

3. Condina, Mark Rocco. Development of sensitive proteomic approaches for protein tyrosine phosphorylation detection.

Degree: 2011, University of Adelaide

 The elucidation of the complex array of cell signalling cascades is imperative for a deeper understanding of cell biology in both physiological and patho-physiological states.… (more)

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APA (6th Edition):

Condina, M. R. (2011). Development of sensitive proteomic approaches for protein tyrosine phosphorylation detection. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72720

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Condina, Mark Rocco. “Development of sensitive proteomic approaches for protein tyrosine phosphorylation detection.” 2011. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72720.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Condina, Mark Rocco. “Development of sensitive proteomic approaches for protein tyrosine phosphorylation detection.” 2011. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Condina MR. Development of sensitive proteomic approaches for protein tyrosine phosphorylation detection. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72720.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Condina MR. Development of sensitive proteomic approaches for protein tyrosine phosphorylation detection. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72720

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

4. Gustafsson, Ove Johan Ragnar. Molecular characterization of metastatic ovarian cancer by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

Degree: 2012, University of Adelaide

 Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a novel technology which measures the spatial distribution of drugs, lipids, peptides and proteins across tissue sections by application of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ovarian cancer; mass spectrometry; imaging

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APA (6th Edition):

Gustafsson, O. J. R. (2012). Molecular characterization of metastatic ovarian cancer by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/78710

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gustafsson, Ove Johan Ragnar. “Molecular characterization of metastatic ovarian cancer by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.” 2012. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/78710.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gustafsson, Ove Johan Ragnar. “Molecular characterization of metastatic ovarian cancer by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.” 2012. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Gustafsson OJR. Molecular characterization of metastatic ovarian cancer by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/78710.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gustafsson OJR. Molecular characterization of metastatic ovarian cancer by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/78710

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

5. McInnes, Natasha Jacqueline. A tumour suppressor role for FOXP3 and FOXP3-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells.

Degree: 2013, University of Adelaide

 During their lifetime, 1 in 9 Australian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, a disease that arises due to mutations and epigenetic modifications to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: FOXP3; microRNA; breast cancer; SATB1; gene regulation networks; tumour suppressor

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APA (6th Edition):

McInnes, N. J. (2013). A tumour suppressor role for FOXP3 and FOXP3-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/83609

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McInnes, Natasha Jacqueline. “A tumour suppressor role for FOXP3 and FOXP3-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells.” 2013. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/83609.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McInnes, Natasha Jacqueline. “A tumour suppressor role for FOXP3 and FOXP3-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells.” 2013. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

McInnes NJ. A tumour suppressor role for FOXP3 and FOXP3-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/83609.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McInnes NJ. A tumour suppressor role for FOXP3 and FOXP3-regulated microRNAs in breast cancer cells. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/83609

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

6. Chan, Jennifer. Pre-existing strain specific neutralising antibodies abrogates the induction of interferon type I and cytotoxic T cell responses to subsequent homotypic influenza A virus challenge.

Degree: 2013, University of Adelaide

 Current inactivated influenza vaccines target the generation of influenza-specific antibodies to provide homotypic protection. However, little is known about the effects of annual vaccinations on… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immune response; virus challenge; B cells; influenza A virus; T cells; antibodies; interferon type I

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APA (6th Edition):

Chan, J. (2013). Pre-existing strain specific neutralising antibodies abrogates the induction of interferon type I and cytotoxic T cell responses to subsequent homotypic influenza A virus challenge. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/90751

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chan, Jennifer. “Pre-existing strain specific neutralising antibodies abrogates the induction of interferon type I and cytotoxic T cell responses to subsequent homotypic influenza A virus challenge.” 2013. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/90751.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chan, Jennifer. “Pre-existing strain specific neutralising antibodies abrogates the induction of interferon type I and cytotoxic T cell responses to subsequent homotypic influenza A virus challenge.” 2013. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Chan J. Pre-existing strain specific neutralising antibodies abrogates the induction of interferon type I and cytotoxic T cell responses to subsequent homotypic influenza A virus challenge. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/90751.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chan J. Pre-existing strain specific neutralising antibodies abrogates the induction of interferon type I and cytotoxic T cell responses to subsequent homotypic influenza A virus challenge. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/90751

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

7. Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth. The role and regulation of the p84 adaptor subunit in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ lipid-kinase signalling and the control of PI3Kγ-dependent cell migration.

Degree: 2015, University of Adelaide

 The Class IB phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) enzyme, PI3Kγ, is activated and recruited to the plasma membrane in response to G protein-coupled receptor stimulation. Upon activation,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: p84 adaptor subunit of PI3Kγ; P13K signalling; cell migration

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APA (6th Edition):

Turvey, M. E. (2015). The role and regulation of the p84 adaptor subunit in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ lipid-kinase signalling and the control of PI3Kγ-dependent cell migration. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111403

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth. “The role and regulation of the p84 adaptor subunit in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ lipid-kinase signalling and the control of PI3Kγ-dependent cell migration.” 2015. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111403.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth. “The role and regulation of the p84 adaptor subunit in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ lipid-kinase signalling and the control of PI3Kγ-dependent cell migration.” 2015. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Turvey ME. The role and regulation of the p84 adaptor subunit in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ lipid-kinase signalling and the control of PI3Kγ-dependent cell migration. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111403.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Turvey ME. The role and regulation of the p84 adaptor subunit in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ lipid-kinase signalling and the control of PI3Kγ-dependent cell migration. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111403

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

8. Niu, Meizhi. Investigation of PI3Kγ signaling downstream of IGF-1R-CXCR4 transactivation in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

Degree: 2012, University of Adelaide

 Breast cancer metastasis is a multi-step process regulated by a number of homeostatic factors. The insulin-like growth factor 1 tyrosine kinase receptor (IGF-1R) and the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: IGF-1R; P13Ky; transactivation; DIGE; eEF2

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APA (6th Edition):

Niu, M. (2012). Investigation of PI3Kγ signaling downstream of IGF-1R-CXCR4 transactivation in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82084

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Niu, Meizhi. “Investigation of PI3Kγ signaling downstream of IGF-1R-CXCR4 transactivation in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.” 2012. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82084.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Niu, Meizhi. “Investigation of PI3Kγ signaling downstream of IGF-1R-CXCR4 transactivation in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.” 2012. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Niu M. Investigation of PI3Kγ signaling downstream of IGF-1R-CXCR4 transactivation in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82084.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Niu M. Investigation of PI3Kγ signaling downstream of IGF-1R-CXCR4 transactivation in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82084

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

9. Harata-Lee, Yuka. The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in progression and metastasis of cancer.

Degree: 2012, University of Adelaide

 The significance of chemokine receptors CCR7, CCR9 and their ligands CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 in various types of cancer including mammary carcinoma and melanoma has… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: chemokine biology; cancer biology; tumour immunology

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

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APA (6th Edition):

Harata-Lee, Y. (2012). The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in progression and metastasis of cancer. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80399

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harata-Lee, Yuka. “The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in progression and metastasis of cancer.” 2012. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80399.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harata-Lee, Yuka. “The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in progression and metastasis of cancer.” 2012. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Harata-Lee Y. The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in progression and metastasis of cancer. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80399.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harata-Lee Y. The role of the atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR in progression and metastasis of cancer. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80399

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

10. Yu, Chunping. Immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D3 on mast cells during immunoglobulin E-dependent immune responses.

Degree: 2014, University of Adelaide

 Mast cells (MCs) can exert anti-inflammatory effects via production of interleukin (IL)- 10 in a number of Immunoglobulin (Ig)E-independent immune responses. Recently, we reported that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: mast cell; vitamin D3; allergic responses; immunoregulatory

…digital research repository of the University of Adelaide, the Library catalogue, the… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

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APA (6th Edition):

Yu, C. (2014). Immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D3 on mast cells during immunoglobulin E-dependent immune responses. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91205

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Chunping. “Immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D3 on mast cells during immunoglobulin E-dependent immune responses.” 2014. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91205.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Chunping. “Immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D3 on mast cells during immunoglobulin E-dependent immune responses.” 2014. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Yu C. Immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D3 on mast cells during immunoglobulin E-dependent immune responses. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91205.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yu C. Immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D3 on mast cells during immunoglobulin E-dependent immune responses. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91205

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

11. Hampton-Smith, Sharon. The roles of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 in breast cancer.

Degree: 2007, University of Adelaide

 A growing body of work implicates chemokines and their receptors in the progression of various types of cancer, including breast cancer. However, as potent chemotactic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: chemokines; breast cancer; CXCL12; CXCL16

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APA (6th Edition):

Hampton-Smith, S. (2007). The roles of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 in breast cancer. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58975

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hampton-Smith, Sharon. “The roles of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 in breast cancer.” 2007. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58975.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hampton-Smith, Sharon. “The roles of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 in breast cancer.” 2007. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Hampton-Smith S. The roles of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 in breast cancer. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2007. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58975.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hampton-Smith S. The roles of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 in breast cancer. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58975

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

12. Melino, Michelle. The role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in human T cell function.

Degree: 2009, University of Adelaide

 T cells are involved in cellular pathways which enable the immune system to protect us against infection and cancer. However, the same mechanisms also allow… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: T cells; cytokines; c-jun N-terminal kinase; mitogen-activated protein kinases

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APA (6th Edition):

Melino, M. (2009). The role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in human T cell function. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/56209

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Melino, Michelle. “The role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in human T cell function.” 2009. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/56209.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Melino, Michelle. “The role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in human T cell function.” 2009. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Melino M. The role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in human T cell function. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2009. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/56209.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Melino M. The role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in human T cell function. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/56209

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.