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You searched for +publisher:"University of Adelaide" +contributor:("Helps, Stephen Clayton"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Amato, Damian P. Animal models for intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury.

Degree: 2010, University of Adelaide

The aim of this study was to identify appropriate animal models of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and brain tissue oxygenation (P[subscript]btO₂) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) that would be suitable for the development of novel therapies for secondary brain injury. Monitoring of ICP and P[subscript]btO₂ are important for understanding the effects of altered cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Tissue oxygenation is determined by the interaction of these variables and is important in the prevention of secondary injury following TBI. Unfortunately, few animal models reproduce the ICP and P[subscript]btO₂ response that has been observed in the human condition. Previous studies at the University of Adelaide have used an ovine model of TBI in which the neuropathological response in these animals accurately mimics human TBI. However functional studies using sheep, at present are problematic. Development of an alternative small animal model with scope for functional studies would assist with development of clinical therapies. Aside from rats, which do not exhibit profound increases in ICP without the presence of a significant mass lesion, guinea pigs have been successfully used previously in studies of TBI. We therefore compared the ICP and P[subscript]btO₂ response in guinea pigs with those of sheep. Compared to sheep, the guinea pig proved unsuitable for the study of ICP. Their labile response to inhalational anaesthesia, which included significant hypotension and bradycardia, was a confounding factor. With careful review and alteration to the anaesthetic regime, this problem was reduced, albeit that reproducible increases in ICP were never shown after TBI. Although the reasons for a lack of ICP response in guinea pigs and rats are unknown, we note that sheep have a higher tentorial index than both species, and that the presence of an intact tentorium may restrict increases in pressure to a single compartment, thus increasing ICP. We propose that species with higher tentorial indexes may prove to be a more suitable than rodents for the study of ICP and functional outcome after TBI. Advisors/Committee Members: Vink, Robert (advisor), Helps, Stephen Clayton (advisor), School of Medical Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: traumatic brain injury; intracranial pressure

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APA (6th Edition):

Amato, D. P. (2010). Animal models for intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65143

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Amato, Damian P. “Animal models for intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury.” 2010. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65143.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Amato, Damian P. “Animal models for intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury.” 2010. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Amato DP. Animal models for intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65143.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Amato DP. Animal models for intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65143

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Wells, Adam James. A surgical model of middle cerebral artery occlusive stroke in the sheep.

Degree: 2014, University of Adelaide

Background: Stroke is an acute neurological injury secondary to vascular pathology, and is the second biggest killer of Australians and the leading cause of adult disability. The rationale of current therapy for occlusive stroke is rapid reperfusion of the ischaemic brain to limit the size of the injury. However, there are no standard neuroprotective therapies that have proven to be beneficial in clinical stroke, despite in excess of 1000 novel drugs showing promise in preclinical rodent studies. The consistent failure of clinical translation in rodent models suggests that they are perhaps not the best choice to simulate the intracranial pathophysiological changes that occur following human cerebral ischaemia, and that a better representative animal model with similar neuroanatomical features is required. Small ruminants such as the sheep have proven to be valuable in traumatic brain injury models, and a surgical model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) has recently been developed in the sheep. However, the existing model has a number of shortcomings and is in need of further characterisation before its widespread use in preclinical testing. The aim of this study was therefore to characterise the pathophysiological and radiological response to both temporary and permanent MCAO using a sheep model. Methods: Several different studies were performed. In the first to determine the feasibility of the project, 18 adult male and female Merino sheep were randomised to sham surgery (n=6), permanent MCAO (n=6) or 2 h temporary MCAO (n=6), and animals had intracranial pressure (ICP) and regional brain tissue oxygen (PbtO₂) monitored for 4 h. 6 further animals had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after permanent (n=3) or temporary (n=3) MCAO. In the second study, 10 adult Merino sheep were randomised to sham surgery (n=5) or temporary MCAO (n=5), with continuous monitoring of PbtO₂ to determine the relationship between duration of temporary MCAO and the development of regional hypoxia. In the third study, 28 adult female Merino sheep were randomised to sham surgery (n=6), permanent MCAO (n=10) or temporary MCAO (n=12), and monitored for 24 h under light general anaesthesia. MRI was performed in 12 animals (permanent MCAO n=6, temporary MCAO n=6). Stroke volume was calculated after staining fresh brains with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). Results: The first study demonstrated the feasibility of performing surgical MCAO, with significantly larger ischaemic lesion areas on histology and MRI following permanent versus temporary occlusion. The second study demonstrated that PbtO₂ fell from a mean baseline of 45.0 +/- 14.1mmHg to a predefined hypoxic threshold of 15mmHg after 42.4 +/- 11.2 minutes of temporary MCAO, at a rate of 1.3mmHg/min. The third study showed a significantly elevated ICP, infarct volumes of 27.4 +/- 6.4%, evidence of space occupying cerebral oedema on MRI and a 30% mortality rate following permanent MCAO monitored for 24 h. Conclusions: A surgical model of temporary and permanent… Advisors/Committee Members: Vink, Robert (advisor), Turner, Renée (advisor), Helps, Stephen Clayton (advisor), School of Medical Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: stroke; animal models; middle cerebral artery occlusion

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Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wells, A. J. (2014). A surgical model of middle cerebral artery occlusive stroke in the sheep. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wells, Adam James. “A surgical model of middle cerebral artery occlusive stroke in the sheep.” 2014. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wells, Adam James. “A surgical model of middle cerebral artery occlusive stroke in the sheep.” 2014. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Wells AJ. A surgical model of middle cerebral artery occlusive stroke in the sheep. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wells AJ. A surgical model of middle cerebral artery occlusive stroke in the sheep. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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