Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Adelaide" +contributor:("Hazel, Susan Jane"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Adelaide

1. Hunter, Damien Seth. Neurodevelopmental effects of placental restriction in sheep.

Degree: 2017, University of Adelaide

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and poor perinatal growth in humans are associated with poorer cognition and memory and altered functional lateralisation. Altered brain morphology and neurodevelopment following IUGR appears responsible, and may be ameliorated by neonatal catch-up growth, however assessing relative effects of prenatal and postnatal growth on cognition in humans is difficult due to environmental confounders. Experimental placental restriction (PR) in sheep, via surgical removal of uterine epithelial attachment sites prior to mating, restricts intrauterine growth and is followed by catch-up growth. Cognitive consequences have not been examined in this model. Effects of sex, age and prior learning on cognition were therefore characterised in control (CON) sheep, then effects of PR on learning, memory, cognition, functional and morphological lateralisation were investigated. Size at birth and neonatal fractional growth rates during the first 16 days of life (ie. neonatal catch-up growth) were measured for CON and PR offspring. Behavioural testing occurred at 18 and 40 weeks old. In maze tasks, trials and time per task, bleats and arm entries were recorded for initial learning (L), memory (M1, M2) and reversal (R1, R2) tasks. Behavioural lateralisation was recorded using obstacle avoidance and maze exit preference tasks, and structural lateralisation were measured in the prefrontal cortex brain region at 52 weeks of age. In CON sheep, naive sheep aged 18 or 40 weeks required longer to complete task R1 than 40 week olds retested after learning the task at 18 weeks old, indicating prior learning was recalled at later ages. The exit route used for earlier learning tasks also predicted speed required to solve task R1 in 40N females. Body weight and skull size at birth did not differ between CON and PR lambs utilised for behavioural testing. At 18 weeks, placentally restricted male lambs took more trials to solve the initial learning task, but required less time to complete task R1 than control males. Trials and time required to solve task M1 in 40 week old males correlated negatively with neonatal growth. Bleat frequency during task R1 in 18 week old females correlated positively with birth weight and neonatal fractional growth rate. In 40 week old females, PR were more strongly lateralised in the maze exit preference task lateralisation than CON. Lateralisation direction was consistent between ages in PR females only, and was more consistent between tasks at 18 weeks in PR than CON females. Behavioural lateralisation did not correlate with perinatal growth, and brain morphology at 52 weeks did not differ between treatments. Correlations between perinatal growth and adult brain morphology were largely limited to males, whereas correlations between behaviour and brain morphology existed largely in females. In conclusion, effects of age, sex and experience on cognitive and behavioural outcomes must be taken into account when evaluating these outcomes in sheep. Effects of PR on cognition and behavioural… Advisors/Committee Members: Hazel, Susan Jane (advisor), School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: intrauterine growth restriction; neurodevelopment; sheep; neonatal growth; cognition; learning; memory; lateralization; cerebral asymmetry; Research by Publication

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hunter, D. S. (2017). Neurodevelopmental effects of placental restriction in sheep. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/105874

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hunter, Damien Seth. “Neurodevelopmental effects of placental restriction in sheep.” 2017. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/105874.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hunter, Damien Seth. “Neurodevelopmental effects of placental restriction in sheep.” 2017. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hunter DS. Neurodevelopmental effects of placental restriction in sheep. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/105874.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hunter DS. Neurodevelopmental effects of placental restriction in sheep. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/105874

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

2. McNicholl, Jane Eleanor. Heat stress in racing Greyhounds.

Degree: 2016, University of Adelaide

Heat related illness has been recorded in dogs undertaking strenuous exercise in high temperatures. In South Australia, summertime daily maximum temperatures may reach 50°C. This study aimed to determine if a safe maximum ambient temperature for racing in greyhounds can be established and if particular environmental or phenotypic factors increase the risk of greyhounds developing hyperthermia. A preliminary study compared four temperature recording devices to determine their suitability for use in a racing environment. Digital rectal thermometry was the most reliable and convenient method of recording greyhounds’ body temperature. An observational study was then undertaken at racetracks in South Australia, during which, environmental temperature and relative humidity were recorded and greyhounds’ body temperatures measured on arrival, pre- and post-race. A mean increase of 2.1 ± 0.4 °C in greyhounds’ (n=239) post-race rectal temperature was recorded. No association was found between environmental temperatures and greyhounds’ temperatures on arrival or pre-race. However, post-racing there was a small but significant relationship between shade temperature and both rectal temperature (r² = 0.023, P = 0.027) and the increase in rectal temperature (r² = 0.033, P = 0.007). No association between environmental relative humidity and body temperature was detected. The influence of sex, bodyweight and coat colour on body temperature increases were investigated. There was a small but significant relationship (r² = 0.04, P = 0.009) between bodyweight and post-exercise rectal temperature. Greyhounds of dark colours developed higher temperatures than light coloured greyhounds (P <0.05). Animal housing at racetracks was examined and temperature and relative humidity levels in enclosed environments were recorded using data loggers and ibuttons. A significant relationship was found between kennel house temperatures and body temperature changes of greyhounds during racing (r² = 0.03, P = 0.009). Temperature and relative humidity levels in dog transport vehicles were monitored with ibuttons when vehicles were stationary and moving in both laden and un-laden states. The effects of an air conditioning system on conditions within a vehicle were measured and responses of dog body temperatures to transport were assessed. In ambient temperatures <33°C the air conditioning system maintained internal trailer temperature below 26°C. Between ambient temperatures 33-37°C, although the internal temperature in the air conditioned trailer rose above 26°C, dogs were able to maintain normal body temperature. Following journeys of approximately 50 minutes in a trailer without air conditioning, mean dog rectal temperature increased by 0.5°C ± 0.2. Results of these studies have identified a number of factors which may increase the risk of greyhounds developing a potentially hazardous level of hyperthermia after exercise. Following racing in external environmental temperatures ≥38°C, 39% of greyhounds developed rectal temperatures ≥ 41.5°C. Large, dark… Advisors/Committee Members: Howarth, Gordon Stanley (advisor), Hazel, Susan Jane (advisor), School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: heat stress; greyhounds; racing

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McNicholl, J. E. (2016). Heat stress in racing Greyhounds. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104052

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNicholl, Jane Eleanor. “Heat stress in racing Greyhounds.” 2016. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104052.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNicholl, Jane Eleanor. “Heat stress in racing Greyhounds.” 2016. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McNicholl JE. Heat stress in racing Greyhounds. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104052.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McNicholl JE. Heat stress in racing Greyhounds. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104052

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

3. Burnard, Cathy Lyn. Measures of behavioural reactivity and their relationships to carcass and meat quality in sheep.

Degree: 2014, University of Adelaide

The ability to measure behaviour and knowledge of the relationships between temperament, stress and productivity in livestock can be utilised in improving livestock production systems, minimising stress and maximising ease of handling and efficiency of production. This research aimed to further the understanding of behavioural reactivity in sheep and investigate links between reactivity, carcass composition and meat quality. This was achieved with a combination of experimental trials and interviews of livestock transporters. Evidence to support the concept of temperament and behavioural reactivity was gathered across the studies. Repeatable differences between sheep were demonstrated, with moderate to strong correlations between some behavioural tests and links between reactivity and physiological indices of stress. Heritability estimates of up to 0.20 were reported; combined with significant breed effects on reactivity this provides evidence of an inherent genetic component of behavioural reactivity. Sheep experience was rated as very important by livestock transporters. Age and experience, although confounded, also appeared to be important in the experimental trials. Older, more experienced lambs were less reactive and their behaviour more repeatable than when measured at a younger age. Although all of the behaviours investigated contributed to overall reactivity, restrained and unrestrained tests are only weakly correlated, indicating that these tests measure distinctly different components of behaviour. A consistent finding in the literature review and experimental chapters was greater reactivity in ewes compared to wethers, although livestock transporters indicated that sex was of minimal importance and ewes and wethers were behaviourally indistinguishable when handled as a mob. Few phenotypic or genetic relationships were found between the behaviours and carcass traits in initial analysis of an industry research flock dataset. However, in an experimental trial behavioural reactivity was related to carcass quality, albeit opposite to the relationship expected, with higher reactivity being associated with better loin pH. Lambs that were more reactive at behavioural testing appeared to be stressed in lairage, most likely as they were moved to the stunning area, triggering lactic acid production, resulting in lower loin pH 24 hours post slaughter. Methodological advances were made during this research. The first of these was in regards to the measurement of flight speed, validating this behavioural test in sheep and assessing the appropriate distance for use in this species. This thesis also assessed the usefulness of face cover score and hairline position as indicators for a variety of measures of behavioural reactivity. The results give strong evidence against the future use of facial hair patterning as an indicator for behaviour in this species. These results show that behavioural reactivity on farm, combining flight speed and restrained tests and measured later in life (after weaning), can be used to predict… Advisors/Committee Members: Pitchford, Wayne Scott (advisor), Hazel, Susan Jane (advisor), Hocking Edwards, Janelle Elizabeth (advisor), School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: temperament; lamb; stress; handling

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burnard, C. L. (2014). Measures of behavioural reactivity and their relationships to carcass and meat quality in sheep. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99035

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burnard, Cathy Lyn. “Measures of behavioural reactivity and their relationships to carcass and meat quality in sheep.” 2014. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99035.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burnard, Cathy Lyn. “Measures of behavioural reactivity and their relationships to carcass and meat quality in sheep.” 2014. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Burnard CL. Measures of behavioural reactivity and their relationships to carcass and meat quality in sheep. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99035.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Burnard CL. Measures of behavioural reactivity and their relationships to carcass and meat quality in sheep. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/99035

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.