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You searched for +publisher:"University of Adelaide" +contributor:("Hasterok, Derrick"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Rugari, Joseph. [EMBARGOED] Electrokinetic Methods and Applications in Australian Aquifer Settings: High-Dimension Electrical Tomography Imaging and Neural Network Filtration Techniques.

Degree: 2018, University of Adelaide

Being the driest continent in the world, there is a significant reliance on groundwater resources within many communities and industries throughout Australia. Particularly in regional areas with low rainfall and surface runoff resources, the underlying groundwater availability plays a pivotal role in population capacity and economic prosperity. Whilst the importance of groundwater resources is indisputable, many aspects of its real world homeostatic processes, in both macro and micro scales, remain difficult to decipher and explain. Within Australia‚Äôs fractured rock aquifer systems, attributed with storage of the largest volume of groundwater resources nationally, there is still only fragmented understandings of several of their principal components and capacities. This is inclusive even of key aquifer characteristics, such as total volume estimations, regeneration sources, and their flow or transportation methods. Improved modeling capabilities and techniques based on prominent and robust hydrogeological principals are continually emerging from advancing technologies, new data sources and forward thinking. However, within the field data retrieval facet of hydrological research a seemingly slower evolution is taking place. A vast quantity of aquifer information is still derived directly from intrusive observation wells. Although the plethora of information these wells can yield in modelling is invaluable, there are some profound limitations that must still be addressed. Wells are costly to establish due to drilling expenses, can only provide single point information, and can also be disruptive to the homeostasis of the system. The self-potential method is an electro-kinetic geophysical method that has recently been re-identified as an immensely promising groundwater technique. It is a fast, passive, inexpensive surface technique which requires no drilling. Uniquely and most importantly however, it is the only geophysical method that is directly sensitive to not only the presence of groundwater, but also the physical flow of groundwater due to its generation of a measurable electrical signal. Previously regarded as a predominately qualitative geophysical tool, contributing factors including advancements in low-cost instrumentation and processing capabilities have meant self-potential surveys can now provide spatially significant quantitative data for a range of groundwater modelling inputs such as permeability. The method has been recurrently reviewed since its early conception in international geophysical literature through to modern times. However, only a small quantity of this peer reviewed research has been conducted within Australia. A lesser extent of published literature therefore deals in particularly with addressing the challenges of both our harsh climate, and surface and geological conditions. With our own unique geological and hydrogeological settings, current and future challenges regarding securement of groundwater resources, and increasingly common practice of industrial geotechnical processes such as… Advisors/Committee Members: Heinson, Graham (advisor), Hasterok, Derrick (advisor), School of Physical Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Groundwater; electrokinetics; self-potential; fractured rock aquifer; ANN; environmental noise filtration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rugari, J. (2018). [EMBARGOED] Electrokinetic Methods and Applications in Australian Aquifer Settings: High-Dimension Electrical Tomography Imaging and Neural Network Filtration Techniques. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/120345

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rugari, Joseph. “[EMBARGOED] Electrokinetic Methods and Applications in Australian Aquifer Settings: High-Dimension Electrical Tomography Imaging and Neural Network Filtration Techniques.” 2018. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/120345.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rugari, Joseph. “[EMBARGOED] Electrokinetic Methods and Applications in Australian Aquifer Settings: High-Dimension Electrical Tomography Imaging and Neural Network Filtration Techniques.” 2018. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Rugari J. [EMBARGOED] Electrokinetic Methods and Applications in Australian Aquifer Settings: High-Dimension Electrical Tomography Imaging and Neural Network Filtration Techniques. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/120345.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rugari J. [EMBARGOED] Electrokinetic Methods and Applications in Australian Aquifer Settings: High-Dimension Electrical Tomography Imaging and Neural Network Filtration Techniques. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/120345

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Adelaide

2. Kirkby, Alison Louise. The resistivity and permeability of fractured rocks.

Degree: 2016, University of Adelaide

Fracture permeability is necessary for the development of many unconventional energy resources, as they are often hosted in rocks with low primary permeability. The magnetotelluric (MT) method has previously imaged temporal resistivity changes associated with injection of conductive fluids into the subsurface. This thesis examines MT responses over two areas of the Otway Basin, Australia, to determine what characteristics of natural fractures can be imaged using MT. In addition, the resistivity and permeability of synthetic fractures and 3D fracture networks are modelled, to draw a link between the resistivity values that are measured and the permeability. One dimensional anisotropic MT inversions in the Koroit region, Victoria, central onshore Otway Basin, delineate strong resistivity anisotropy at 2-3 km depth with a north-northwest strike. The anisotropy strike is consistent with that of known fracture networks in the Koroit region, and the groundwater at this depth is known to be saline. Thus, the resistivity anisotropy is interpreted as fluid-_filled fractures and faults, reducing the resistivity in the north-northwest direction. In contrast, anisotropic inversions in the Penola Trough, western Otway Basin, reveal only minor anisotropy that is inconsistent with known fractures from coincident well image log and seismic data. Thus, an isotropic interpretation is consistent with the data here. Likewise, higher resistivities and lower permeabilities have been measured in wells in Penola, compared to Koroit. The resistivity and permeability of synthetic fractures filled with an electrically conductive fluid change non-linearly as the fractures are incrementally opened. A percolation threshold can be defined, below which the permeability and resistivity are close to the rock matrix values. At the percolation threshold, the permeability increases by three orders of magnitude or more over an aperture change of < 0.1 mm. The resistivity change depends on the ratio of the rock to fluid resistivity but is generally less than the permeability change, and occurs over a wider aperture range. Similar characteristics are observed in 3D fracture networks except that in networks, percolation is controlled by both the fault network density and fault connectivity. Many sparse networks will not percolate no matter how open the faults are. When the fault density is sufficiently high, a percolation threshold can be defined in terms of the mean fault aperture. At the percolation threshold, a change in mean aperture of 0.02 mm changes the permeability by four orders of magnitude and resistivity by a factor of four. The percolation threshold does not necessarily occur at the same aperture for different flow directions, so fault networks near their percolation threshold commonly show anisotropy in both resistivity and permeability. Therefore, not only are the MT responses in the Koroit region of the Otway Basin consistent with the presence of resistivity anisotropy due to pervasive open fractures and faults, but realistic fault networks… Advisors/Committee Members: Heinson, Graham Stewart (advisor), Holford, Simon Paul (advisor), Hasterok, Derrick (advisor), School of Physical Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: magnetotelluric; electromagnetic; resistivity; conductivity; fracture; fluid; permeability; Research by publication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kirkby, A. L. (2016). The resistivity and permeability of fractured rocks. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111944

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kirkby, Alison Louise. “The resistivity and permeability of fractured rocks.” 2016. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111944.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kirkby, Alison Louise. “The resistivity and permeability of fractured rocks.” 2016. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kirkby AL. The resistivity and permeability of fractured rocks. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111944.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kirkby AL. The resistivity and permeability of fractured rocks. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111944

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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