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You searched for +publisher:"University of Adelaide" +contributor:("Coyle, Andrew James"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Chau, Raymee. MANET routing with prediction.

Degree: 2013, University of Adelaide

Route stability of Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs) is one of the major problems in defence tactical wireless networks. The dynamic nature of MANETs may cause the network topology to change frequently as a result of unstable links, which may result in frequent route changes. Unstable routes may cause retransmissions and drop outs. Therefore, the network can experience heavy traffic overload and high packet losses. Many network applications rely on a stable and reliable route. Hence, it is important for the military to have a reliable network that allows effective communications amongst various platforms to effectively perform the tasks they have been assigned. For this reason, the route’s stability in MANETs needs to be understood. However, many existing MANET routing protocols are not explicitly designed for route stability. It is expected that prediction can assist in increasing a MANET’s route stability. This thesis explores the potential benefits and the trade-offs in the use of prediction with the Ad-hoc On-demand Distance Vector (AODV) routing protocol. In the context of using prediction in routing, research has shown that using “accurate” predictions can improve MANETs’ routing performance. However, Chapter 3 shows that it is difficult to achieve accurate predictions. To the author’s knowledge, very little work has been attempted to analyse the routing performance with reduced prediction accuracies, and the effects of having inaccurate prediction. Thus more specifically, this thesis examines the robustness of using link duration prediction with various accuracies for MANETs, and identifies the conditions for which predictions can improve routing performance. This is achieved by first examining how using perfectly accurate link duration prediction can improve routing performance. For this purpose, a new routing protocol, Ad-hoc On-demand Distance Vector with Perfect Prediction (AODV-PP), has been created to propagate link duration prediction information for route establishment. The OPNET simulator was used to simulate network scenarios with AODV and AODV-PP for analysis, and the routing performance of the two protocols have been compared. The thesis later explores how inaccurate link duration prediction affects routing performance. However, the AODV-PP protocol does not inform the source about the change in predicted link duration. This can cause delays in route re-establishment and high packet loss. Hence, AODV with Prediction Update (AODV-PU) has been proposed to allow link duration prediction updates to be sent to the source for route maintenance. Network scenarios with AODV-PU were simulated to analyse and compare its routing performance with AODV and AODV-PP. This thesis shows stable routes can be found with perfect prediction, which reduces packet loss and routing overhead. However, it also indicates that it is difficult to use link duration prediction to find a more stable route with inaccurate long-term predictions. Nevertheless, link duration prediction can be useful for route updates and route… Advisors/Committee Members: White, Langford Barton (advisor), Coyle, Andrew James (advisor), Rumsewicz, Michael Peter (advisor), School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (school).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chau, R. (2013). MANET routing with prediction. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80999

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chau, Raymee. “MANET routing with prediction.” 2013. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80999.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chau, Raymee. “MANET routing with prediction.” 2013. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Chau R. MANET routing with prediction. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80999.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chau R. MANET routing with prediction. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80999

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Hunjet, Robert Anthony. Adaptive topologies: improving wireless networks through the use of additional nodes and power control.

Degree: 2014, University of Adelaide

The work presented in this thesis shows that shared spectrum wireless networks can be enhanced through the use of additional nodes and power control. Network improvement is demonstrated in three key areas: connectivity, capacity and power efficiency. It is also shown that the techniques developed to increase network capacity and power efficiency have a positive effect on the security of the network. Mobile ad hoc networks are the specific focus of the work, but the results are applicable to both wireless sensor networks and shared spectrum wireless infrastructure based networks. This thesis demonstrates how additional nodes may be used in mobile wireless networks to maintain connectivity by specifically targeting bridges and articulation points. It then takes a graph theoretical approach to networking, with the assumption that lowering interference increases network capacity, to show that additional nodes combined with power control can be used to simultaneously increase the capacity and power efficiency of wireless networks. An implementation of a novel method to generate all possible transmission states under a Request To Send (RTS) / Clear To Send (CTS) scheme is used in the creation of a repeatable metric, Uniform Average Network Capacity (UANC). This metric describes the capacity that can be held within a network, and is suitable for comparing one network to another, enabling its use in optimisations. UANC is used in a multi objective cross entropy optimisation of capacity and power efficiency to create Pareto optimal sets of viable network topologies which exhibit high capacity and low power use. The work presented then derives the conditions under which n simultaneous transmissions are beneficial to capacity. This leads to the definition of a separation multiplier, i.e., the ratio of distances between receivers and between senders and their receivers, which is used to create wireless networks which exhibit high UANC. The separation multiplier is then utilised in existing networks, where topologies are altered through the modification of transmission powers and the use of additional nodes, to create higher capacity networks, showing that additional nodes can benefit network capacity. This technique has the added benefit of increasing network power efficiency. A modification to the RTS/CTS protocol which uses the separation multiplier is then presented. The new scheme has the effect of allowing only beneficial simultaneous transmissions to occur. It is shown through simulation that this approach increases network capacity. Networks which implement the capacity and power efficiency enhancing measures presented are shown to exhibit increased security, in that the lowering of transmission power and allowance of multiple transmissions within the network reduces the distance at which trans- missions can be detected and decoded. Finally, an implementation of the overall knowledge gained through the thesis is presented, augmenting existing networks with additional nodes and power control to create bi-connected, power… Advisors/Committee Members: Sorell, Matthew James (advisor), Coyle, Andrew James (advisor), School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (school).

Subjects/Keywords: wireless networks; capacity; power control; topology control; power efficiency; survivability; optimisation; node placement; MANET

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hunjet, R. A. (2014). Adaptive topologies: improving wireless networks through the use of additional nodes and power control. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85035

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hunjet, Robert Anthony. “Adaptive topologies: improving wireless networks through the use of additional nodes and power control.” 2014. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85035.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hunjet, Robert Anthony. “Adaptive topologies: improving wireless networks through the use of additional nodes and power control.” 2014. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Hunjet RA. Adaptive topologies: improving wireless networks through the use of additional nodes and power control. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85035.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hunjet RA. Adaptive topologies: improving wireless networks through the use of additional nodes and power control. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85035

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.