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You searched for +publisher:"University Utrecht" +contributor:("Bos, R."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Steenbergen, Marlies van. Maturity and effectiveness of enterprise architecture.

Degree: 2011, University Utrecht

Because of the need for continuous change, many organizations face an increasing complexity in their information systems portfolio. One of the answers to this increase in complexity, is the introduction of enterprise architecture (EA): the development and application of a consistent set of principles and models to guide the design and realization of processes, information systems and technological infrastructure from a holistic perspective. The application of a holistic view is expected to make complexity manageable and to prevent further increase in complexity. Though organizations are becoming progressively aware that they need EA to manage the complexity of their processes and IS, there are still many questions as to how to implement an effective EA practice. This research aims to contribute to the knowledge about how to achieve an effective EA practice. First of all, the research focuses on how to determine the effectiveness of an EA practice. Effectiveness of an EA practice is defined as the extent to which the EA practice contributes to the achievement of the business goals of the organization. Using a design-science research approach, a model is developed with which organizations can chart the intended contribution of their EA practice to their business goals. The model can be used by organizations to set coherent priorities for their EA practice and to define key performance indicators for measuring its effectiveness. The next question to be answered is how the activities, responsibilities and actors concerned with defining and applying EA can be developed to achieve the desired contribution. To answer this question a maturity model for EA practices is presented. The maturity model is used to assess EA practices and define improvement paths. Application of the maturity model to 56 organizations provides insight into common strengths and weaknesses. This may help focus future research efforts. The underlying structure of the maturity model presented, is precisely defined and described making it applicable for other researchers and other functional domains. Organizational factors like organizational culture and size may influence the techniques architects can use to achieve effectiveness. By using both case studies and statistical analysis of survey data the impact of such contextual factors is investigated. From the case studies it appears that especially the cultural dimensions of central control versus autonomy, extent of collaboration, and process or result orientation, influence the use of EA application techniques. Case studies also show the importance of interaction between architects, especially at the domain or tactical level. The survey shows that EA techniques used and EA benefits experienced differ among economic sectors. This dissertation looks at the EA practice from several perspectives, thus extending the overall knowledge about the use of EA in practice. It provides both instruments for developing the EA practice, like the architecture effectiveness model and the architecture maturity model,… Advisors/Committee Members: Brinkkemper, S., Bos, R..

Subjects/Keywords: enterprise architecture; architecture effectiveness model; PACS Maturity Model; architecture maturity matrix; process improvement; organizational culture; cultural dimensions; contextual factors; architectural practice; design science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Steenbergen, M. v. (2011). Maturity and effectiveness of enterprise architecture. (Doctoral Dissertation). University Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-5554-1 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steenbergen, Marlies van. “Maturity and effectiveness of enterprise architecture.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University Utrecht. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-5554-1 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steenbergen, Marlies van. “Maturity and effectiveness of enterprise architecture.” 2011. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Steenbergen Mv. Maturity and effectiveness of enterprise architecture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-5554-1 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434.

Council of Science Editors:

Steenbergen Mv. Maturity and effectiveness of enterprise architecture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2011. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-5554-1 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-205434 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/205434

2. Koot, S. Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making.

Degree: 2013, University Utrecht

Decision-making refers to assessing costs and benefits of competing actions, with either a known outcome or an uncertain result. Decision-making depends on several abilities, such as behavioural flexibility and inhibiting risky responses. Several factors affect decision-making, causing differences in the outcome of decision-making processes. The overall aim was to improve our understanding of effects of stress and gender on decision-making, in rodents and in humans. First, impulsive decision-making was examined by testing male and female mice in a delay-discounting task. The data show that female mice shift more quickly from a large-late to a small-soon reward than male mice. While this suggests that female mice are more impulsive than male mice, an alternative explanation is that female mice are more exploratory than male mice and thus detect changes earlier. Factors like gender and internal state, but also handling-induced stress may affect task outcome. Therefore, home-cage testing has become popular. Here, a pilot study on home-cage testing of delay-discounting was conducted in rats. No differences were found in task-performance compared to traditional stand-alone tasks. Following from this, rats were tested in a home-cage setting in a more complex decision-making task: a new protocol to run a rodent version of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a task for decision-making in humans. To validate this protocol, brain serotonin levels in rats were manipulated prior to testing their decision-making. As expected, lowering serotonin levels led to both poor decision-making and to gambling proneness. As increases in the stress hormone cortisol have been shown to disrupt IGT decision-making in men, time-dependent effects of corticosterone - the rodent equivalent of cortisol - on decision-making were addressed by treating male rats at two different time-points prior to testing in the rodent version of the IGT. Administration of corticosterone 30 min prior to testing disrupted reward-based decision-making. This was associated with increased c-Fos expression in a number of areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, infralimbic cortex and insular cortex. Administration of corticosterone 3 hours prior to testing had no effect on task-performance. In line with systemic injections, infusions of corticosterone in the infralimbic cortex disrupted reward-based decision-making. The data for the lateral orbitofrontal cortex were inconclusive, possibly due to (unintended) damage, preventing treatment differences to be observed. Finally, time-dependent effects of stress on social decision-making were addressed. Earlier studies showed that experimentally induced stress in men is associated with lowered generosity, and altered altruistic punishment in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, women stress altruistic punishment or general altruism in women was not affected in a time-dependent manner by stress. This may be due to, among other things, the use of hormonal contraceptives, a condition that is associated with a more blunted… Advisors/Committee Members: Joëls, Marian, Vanderschuren, Louk, van den Bos, R..

Subjects/Keywords: Econometric and Statistical Methods: General; Geneeskunde (GENK); Geneeskunde(GENK); Medical sciences; Bescherming en bevordering van de menselijke gezondheid

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koot, S. (2013). Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making. (Doctoral Dissertation). University Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koot, S. “Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University Utrecht. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koot, S. “Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making.” 2013. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Koot S. Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476.

Council of Science Editors:

Koot S. Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2013. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476

3. Koot, S. Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making.

Degree: 2013, University Utrecht

Decision-making refers to assessing costs and benefits of competing actions, with either a known outcome or an uncertain result. Decision-making depends on several abilities, such as behavioural flexibility and inhibiting risky responses. Several factors affect decision-making, causing differences in the outcome of decision-making processes. The overall aim was to improve our understanding of effects of stress and gender on decision-making, in rodents and in humans. First, impulsive decision-making was examined by testing male and female mice in a delay-discounting task. The data show that female mice shift more quickly from a large-late to a small-soon reward than male mice. While this suggests that female mice are more impulsive than male mice, an alternative explanation is that female mice are more exploratory than male mice and thus detect changes earlier. Factors like gender and internal state, but also handling-induced stress may affect task outcome. Therefore, home-cage testing has become popular. Here, a pilot study on home-cage testing of delay-discounting was conducted in rats. No differences were found in task-performance compared to traditional stand-alone tasks. Following from this, rats were tested in a home-cage setting in a more complex decision-making task: a new protocol to run a rodent version of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a task for decision-making in humans. To validate this protocol, brain serotonin levels in rats were manipulated prior to testing their decision-making. As expected, lowering serotonin levels led to both poor decision-making and to gambling proneness. As increases in the stress hormone cortisol have been shown to disrupt IGT decision-making in men, time-dependent effects of corticosterone - the rodent equivalent of cortisol - on decision-making were addressed by treating male rats at two different time-points prior to testing in the rodent version of the IGT. Administration of corticosterone 30 min prior to testing disrupted reward-based decision-making. This was associated with increased c-Fos expression in a number of areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, infralimbic cortex and insular cortex. Administration of corticosterone 3 hours prior to testing had no effect on task-performance. In line with systemic injections, infusions of corticosterone in the infralimbic cortex disrupted reward-based decision-making. The data for the lateral orbitofrontal cortex were inconclusive, possibly due to (unintended) damage, preventing treatment differences to be observed. Finally, time-dependent effects of stress on social decision-making were addressed. Earlier studies showed that experimentally induced stress in men is associated with lowered generosity, and altered altruistic punishment in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, women stress altruistic punishment or general altruism in women was not affected in a time-dependent manner by stress. This may be due to, among other things, the use of hormonal contraceptives, a condition that is associated with a more blunted… Advisors/Committee Members: Joëls, Marian, Vanderschuren, Louk, van den Bos, R..

Subjects/Keywords: Econometric and Statistical Methods: General; Geneeskunde (GENK); Geneeskunde(GENK); Medical sciences; Bescherming en bevordering van de menselijke gezondheid

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koot, S. (2013). Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making. (Doctoral Dissertation). University Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koot, S. “Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University Utrecht. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koot, S. “Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making.” 2013. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Koot S. Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476.

Council of Science Editors:

Koot S. Make up your mind - How stress and sex affect decision-making. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2013. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; urn:isbn:978-90-393-6034-7 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-283476 ; http://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/283476

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