Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University College Cork" +contributor:("Moore, Eric J."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University College Cork

1. Messina, Walter. Micro and nanostructured impedance sensors for biological and biomedical applications.

Degree: 2014, University College Cork

This thesis work covered the fabrication and characterisation of impedance sensors for biological applications aiming in particular to the cytotoxicity monitoring of cultured cells exposed to different kind of chemical compounds and drugs and to the identification of different types of biological tissue (fat, muscles, nerves) using a sensor fabricated on the tip of a commercially available needle during peripheral nerve block procedures. Gold impedance electrodes have been successfully fabricated for impedance measurement on cells cultured on the electrode surface which was modified with the fabrication of gold nanopillars. These nanostructures have a height of 60nm or 100nm and they have highly ordered layout as they are fabricated through the e-beam technique. The fabrication of the threedimensional structures on the interdigitated electrodes was supposed to improve the sensitivity of the ECIS (electric cell-substrate impedance sensing) measurement while monitoring the cytotoxicity effects of two different drugs (Antrodia Camphorata extract and Nicotine) on three different cell lines (HeLa, A549 and BALBc 3T3) cultured on the impedance devices and change the morphology of the cells growing on the nanostructured electrodes. The fabrication of the nanostructures was achieved combining techniques like UV lithography, metal lift-off, evaporation and e-beam lithography techniques. The electrodes were packaged using a pressure sensitive, medical grade adhesive double-sided tape. The electrodes were then characterised with the aid of AFM and SEM imaging which confirmed the success of the fabrication processes showing the nanopillars fabricated with the right layout and dimensions figures. The introduction of nanopillars on the impedance electrodes, however, did not improve much the sensitivity of the assay with the exception of tests carried out with Nicotine. HeLa and A549 cells appeared to grow in a different way on the two surfaces, while no differences where noticed on the BALBc 3T3 cells. Impedance measurements obtained with the dead cells on the negative control electrodes or the test electrodes with the drugs can be compared to those done on the electrodes containing just media in the tested volume (as no cells are attached and cover the electrode surface). The impedance figures recorded using these electrodes were between 1.5kΩ and 2.5 kΩ, while the figures recorded on confluent cell layers range between 4kΩ and 5.5kΩ with peaks of almost 7 kΩ if there was more than one layer of cells growing on each other. There was then a very clear separation between the values of living cell compared to the dead ones which was almost 2.5 - 3kΩ. In this way it was very easy to determine whether the drugs affected the cells normal life cycle on not. However, little or no differences were noticed in the impedance analysis carried out on the two different kinds of electrodes using cultured cells. An increase of sensitivity was noticed only in a couple of experiments carried out on A549 cells growing on the nanostructured… Advisors/Committee Members: Moore, Eric J., SFI.

Subjects/Keywords: Impedance; Nanopillar; Bioimpedance; ECIS; Biosensor; Cell-based biosensor; Peripheral nerve block; Cell culture

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Messina, W. (2014). Micro and nanostructured impedance sensors for biological and biomedical applications. (Thesis). University College Cork. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2100

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Messina, Walter. “Micro and nanostructured impedance sensors for biological and biomedical applications.” 2014. Thesis, University College Cork. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2100.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Messina, Walter. “Micro and nanostructured impedance sensors for biological and biomedical applications.” 2014. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Messina W. Micro and nanostructured impedance sensors for biological and biomedical applications. [Internet] [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2100.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Messina W. Micro and nanostructured impedance sensors for biological and biomedical applications. [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2100

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University College Cork

2. Crowley, Una Bernadette. Development of low-cost sensing and separation devices based on macro, micro and nano technology for health applications.

Degree: 2014, University College Cork

The work presented in this thesis described the development of low-cost sensing and separation devices with electrochemical detections for health applications. This research employs macro, micro and nano technology. The first sensing device developed was a tonerbased micro-device. The initial development of microfluidic devices was based on glass or quartz devices that are often expensive to fabricate; however, the introduction of new types of materials, such as plastics, offered a new way for fast prototyping and the development of disposable devices. One such microfluidic device is based on the lamination of laser-printed polyester films using a computer, printer and laminator. The resulting toner-based microchips demonstrated a potential viability for chemical assays, coupled with several detection methods, particularly Chip-Electrophoresis-Chemiluminescence (CE-CL) detection which has never been reported in the literature. Following on from the toner-based microchip, a three-electrode micro-configuration was developed on acetate substrate. This is the first time that a micro-electrode configuration made from gold; silver and platinum have been fabricated onto acetate by means of patterning and deposition techniques using the central fabrication facilities in Tyndall National Institute. These electrodes have been designed to facilitate the integration of a 3- electrode configuration as part of the fabrication process. Since the electrodes are on acetate the dicing step can automatically be eliminated. The stability of these sensors has been investigated using electrochemical techniques with excellent outcomes. Following on from the generalised testing of the electrodes these sensors were then coupled with capillary electrophoresis. The final sensing devices were on a macro scale and involved the modifications of screenprinted electrodes. Screen-printed electrodes (SPE) are generally seen to be far less sensitive than the more expensive electrodes including the gold, boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes. To enhance the sensitivity of these electrodes they were treated with metal nano-particles, gold and palladium. Following on from this, another modification was introduced. The carbonaceous material carbon monolith was drop-cast onto the SPE and then the metal nano-particles were electrodeposited onto the monolith material Advisors/Committee Members: Glennon, Jeremy D., Moore, Eric J., SFI.

Subjects/Keywords: Electrochemistry; Chemiluminescence; Toner-based microchips; Acetate microelectrode configuration; Modified screen-printed electrodes; Carbon monolith material; Metal nanoparticles

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crowley, U. B. (2014). Development of low-cost sensing and separation devices based on macro, micro and nano technology for health applications. (Thesis). University College Cork. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2007

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crowley, Una Bernadette. “Development of low-cost sensing and separation devices based on macro, micro and nano technology for health applications.” 2014. Thesis, University College Cork. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2007.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crowley, Una Bernadette. “Development of low-cost sensing and separation devices based on macro, micro and nano technology for health applications.” 2014. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Crowley UB. Development of low-cost sensing and separation devices based on macro, micro and nano technology for health applications. [Internet] [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2007.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Crowley UB. Development of low-cost sensing and separation devices based on macro, micro and nano technology for health applications. [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2007

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University College Cork

3. Savage, Niall Thomas Patrick. Development of a novel probe integrated with a micro-structured impedance sensor for the detection of breast cancer.

Degree: 2016, University College Cork

The work described in this thesis focuses on the development of an innovative bioimpedance device for the detection of breast cancer using electrical impedance as the detection method. The ability for clinicians to detect and treat cancerous lesions as early as possible results in improved patient outcomes and can reduce the severity of the treatment the patient has to undergo. Therefore, new technology and devices are continually required to improve the specificity and sensitivity of the accepted detection methods. The gold standard for breast cancer detection is digital x-ray mammography but it has some significant downsides associated with it. The development of an adjunct technology to aid in the detection of breast cancers could represent a significant patient and economic benefit. In this project silicon substrates were pattern with two gold microelectrodes that allowed electrical impedance measurements to be recorded from intact tissue structures. These probes were tested and characterised using a range of in vitro and ex vivo experiments. The end application of this novel sensor device was in a first-in-human clinical trial. The initial results of this study showed that the silicon impedance device was capable of differentiating between normal and abnormal (benign and cancerous) breast tissue. The mean separation between the two tissue types 4,340 Ω with p < 0.001. The cancer type and grade at the site of the probe recordings was confirmed histologically and correlated with the electrical impedance measurements to determine if the different subtypes of cancer could each be differentiated. The results presented in this thesis showed that the novel impedance device demonstrated excellent electrochemical recording potential; was biocompatible with the growth of cultured cell lines and was capable of differentiating between intact biological tissues. The results outlined in this thesis demonstrate the potential feasibility of using electrical impedance for the differentiation of biological tissue samples. The novelty of this thesis is in the development of a new method of tissue determination with an application in breast cancer detection. Advisors/Committee Members: O'Sullivan, Martin J., O'Donnell, Brian, Moore, Eric J..

Subjects/Keywords: Impedance; Probe; Clinical; Breast cancer

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Savage, N. T. P. (2016). Development of a novel probe integrated with a micro-structured impedance sensor for the detection of breast cancer. (Thesis). University College Cork. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3022

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Savage, Niall Thomas Patrick. “Development of a novel probe integrated with a micro-structured impedance sensor for the detection of breast cancer.” 2016. Thesis, University College Cork. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3022.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Savage, Niall Thomas Patrick. “Development of a novel probe integrated with a micro-structured impedance sensor for the detection of breast cancer.” 2016. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Savage NTP. Development of a novel probe integrated with a micro-structured impedance sensor for the detection of breast cancer. [Internet] [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3022.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Savage NTP. Development of a novel probe integrated with a micro-structured impedance sensor for the detection of breast cancer. [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3022

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.