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You searched for +publisher:"Universiteit Utrecht" +contributor:("van der Leij, W.J.R."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Bloem, A.S. Prevalence of M. canis in cats in a Dutch animal shelter at the moment of admission.

Degree: 2013, Universiteit Utrecht

The risk of introduction of M. canis into Dutch animal shelters is evaluated in this study. M. canis is responsible for the infection with dermatophytosis in more than 90 percent of the cases in cats. The prevalence in a Dutch animal shelter is evaluated over a period of two months by testing the newly admitted cats (n=60) for fungal infections by using the MacKenzie method and culturing on Sabouraud and Selective Agar for three weeks. Fungal colonies were microscopically determined and reported as positive or negative for M. canis. The hypothesis : M. canis in Dutch shelter cats is a prevalent infection (>7,6%) at the moment of infection. No cats tested positive for M.Canis so the prevalence found in this research is 0%. Concluding: based on this outcome the hypothesis is rejected. Advisors/Committee Members: van der Leij, W.J.R..

Subjects/Keywords: Diergeneeskunde; Microsporum canis, feline, dermatophytosis, ringworm, cats, shelter, prevalence

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bloem, A. S. (2013). Prevalence of M. canis in cats in a Dutch animal shelter at the moment of admission. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/281027

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bloem, A S. “Prevalence of M. canis in cats in a Dutch animal shelter at the moment of admission.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/281027.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bloem, A S. “Prevalence of M. canis in cats in a Dutch animal shelter at the moment of admission.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bloem AS. Prevalence of M. canis in cats in a Dutch animal shelter at the moment of admission. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/281027.

Council of Science Editors:

Bloem AS. Prevalence of M. canis in cats in a Dutch animal shelter at the moment of admission. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2013. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/281027


Universiteit Utrecht

2. Godijn, L.M. Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?.

Degree: 2013, Universiteit Utrecht

It is well described in the literature that cats can experience stress in captivity, especially in case of entering-and stay in animal shelters. The knowledge that the experience of stress can have major impact on the welfare of animals has ensured that researchers tried to find a solution for this potential welfare problem. Promising results were found in the experiments of Kry and Casey (2007) executed in a British animal shelter. These researchers were the first who studied the primary effect of the application of a specific environmental enrichment structure; namely a hiding box. As the Dutch situation differs in housing conditions of the shelter cats, the present research had been a derivative of the study of Kry and Casey (2007). The purpose of present study has been to determine the potential effect of a hiding box on the stress levels of newly arrived cats in a Dutch animal shelter. Our hypothesis was that cats that had the ability to hide in a hiding box would show significantly lower stress levels in comparison to cats that did not had this ability. Therefore, 19 newly arrived shelter cats had been divided into two research groups; namely an experimental group whereby the animals were provided with a hiding box (N=10) and a control group (N=9) whereby the animals had no hiding box in their cage. To determine the stress levels of the research animals, behavioral observations had been done during a 14 day period with the help of the Cat-Stress-Score ethogram, developed by Kessler and Turner (1997). The outcome of this study was that the two research groups differed significant in the mean Stress Score on observation day 3 and 4, whereby the experimental group showed an overall lower mean Stress Score in time, compared to the control group. Additionally, the mean Stress Score of the experimental group showed minimal variance and decreased much faster over the 14 day observation period, compared to the control group. These findings suggest that cats provided with a hiding box may be more able to cope effectively with a stressful new environment, than the cats without a hiding box. Another important finding was that the control group showed a kind of “replacement hiding activity”, which was positioned at the only possibility in the cage, in this case behind the litter box. This alternative behavior was also seen in previous research (Carlstead et al., 1993; Gourkow & Fraser, 2006; Kry & Casey, 2007) and might show that the shelter cats were highly motivated to execute hiding behavior; however, this alternative behavior appeared to be inadequate and less effective compared to hiding in a hiding box in all four studies. Conclusively, the findings of the present study showed that the hiding box is an important enrichment type for the cat (Felis silvestris catus) to cope effectively with stressors in a shelter environment and that hiding behavior may even be classified as a behavioral need for this species. Further research is needed to study the effect of a hiding box within group housing systems since group… Advisors/Committee Members: Vinke, C.M., van der Leij, W.J.R..

Subjects/Keywords: Diergeneeskunde; Cat; stress; hiding box; shelter

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Godijn, L. M. (2013). Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/277388

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Godijn, L M. “Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/277388.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Godijn, L M. “Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Godijn LM. Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/277388.

Council of Science Editors:

Godijn LM. Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2013. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/277388


Universiteit Utrecht

3. Neven, E.C. Juvenile castration in cats: The current situation in the Netherlands.

Degree: 2013, Universiteit Utrecht

Cat overpopulation remains a problem in the Netherlands. Juvenile castration (6-16 weeks of age) can help facilitate adopting out young kittens which are unable to reproduce. As a result, problems with owner compliance are avoided and a shorter holding period for kittens in shelters can be achieved. While widely applied in the United States of America (USA), Dutch veterinarians seem reluctant to perform this procedure in kittens. A survey was sent to Dutch veterinarians, specialised in the field of companion animals, which showed that 21% of Dutch veterinarians perform juvenile castration and that this procedure constitutes 9.0% of the total number of castrations. Similar to other western countries, the majority of veterinarians (89%) recommends their clients to castrate cats at the ‘traditional age’ of 6-9 months of age [1-8]. Little scientific data supports this advice [9]. In addition to ethical objections, main concerns among veterinarians regarding juvenile castration are related to anaesthesia and long-term complications. However, research shows that short-term complications are similar to those in adult cats when appropriate care is taken regarding anaesthetic and surgical procedures. Many possible long term complications are either rejected or remain unproven. In the Dutch veterinary practice improvements concerning the procedure of juvenile castration can be executed especially regarding monitoring (i.e. temperature), recovery (feeding) and post operative pain management. Many veterinarians do not see juvenile castration as the right intervention to solve and prevent further overpopulation. However, there is a platform for awareness and advancement in this area since the majority of veterinarians believe there is currently overpopulation of cats and veterinarians should play a role in solving this problem. Practically applicable strategies can be created for long-term solutions regarding the current cat overpopulation. This may be achieved by creating a discussion among veterinarians, shelter personnel, researchers and the professional society for veterinary medicine. Advisors/Committee Members: Akkerdaas, L.C., van der Leij, W.J.R..

Subjects/Keywords: Diergeneeskunde; juvenile; castration; cats; opinion; Dutch; veterinarians

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Neven, E. C. (2013). Juvenile castration in cats: The current situation in the Netherlands. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/285254

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Neven, E C. “Juvenile castration in cats: The current situation in the Netherlands.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/285254.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Neven, E C. “Juvenile castration in cats: The current situation in the Netherlands.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Neven EC. Juvenile castration in cats: The current situation in the Netherlands. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/285254.

Council of Science Editors:

Neven EC. Juvenile castration in cats: The current situation in the Netherlands. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2013. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/285254

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