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You searched for +publisher:"Universiteit Utrecht" +contributor:("Slottje, P."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Universiteit Utrecht

1. Timmerman, J.G. Electromagnetic fields: perception of risk, exposure and health.

Degree: 2010, Universiteit Utrecht

Electromagnetic fields (EMF) are of increasing public concern. Although scientific data have not been able to reveal a direct, causal link of exposure to EMF and health effects, many people claim to get health symptoms due to EMF exposure. The way lay people perceive the risk of EMF can be influenced by many factors, amongst others the perceived EMF exposure and their perceived health. When people ascribe (commonplace) health complaints to EMF, they tend to perceive a high EMF risk and/or a high exposure to EMF. The other way, when people judge the EMF risk as high, a perceived high exposure to EMF can lead to attribution of subjective health complaints to EMF exposure. More research should be done to reveal a potential, causal link between EMF exposure and objective health effects. On the other hand, people who ascribe symptoms to EMF exposure should be taken serious, though psychological factors play an important role in symptom attribution. Advisors/Committee Members: Slottje, P..

Subjects/Keywords: Geneeskunde; Electromagnetic Fields; Risk; Exposure; Perception; Health; Subjective

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Timmerman, J. G. (2010). Electromagnetic fields: perception of risk, exposure and health. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/44524

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Timmerman, J G. “Electromagnetic fields: perception of risk, exposure and health.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/44524.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Timmerman, J G. “Electromagnetic fields: perception of risk, exposure and health.” 2010. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Timmerman JG. Electromagnetic fields: perception of risk, exposure and health. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/44524.

Council of Science Editors:

Timmerman JG. Electromagnetic fields: perception of risk, exposure and health. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2010. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/44524


Universiteit Utrecht

2. Nierop, L.E. van. The Magnetized Brain : Working mechanisms for the effects of MRI-related magnetic fields on cognition, postural stability, and oculomotor function.

Degree: 2015, Universiteit Utrecht

The growing popularity of MRI in clinical settings and the innovative applications in e.g. MRI guided surgery has resulted in more frequent, longer and higher levels of exposure to the stray magnetic fields for employees. Especially the use of stronger field strengths in MRI has been associated with unwanted sensory stimulation and difficulties in task performance. In experimental studies as described in this thesis we investigated the effects of exposure to MRI-related stray static magnetic fields (SMF) and movement-induced low-frequency time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) on behavioral changes in cognitive functions and vestibular related functions of postural stability and oculomotor performance. In addition, possible underlying mechanisms have been suggested. In two experimental studies, healthy volunteers were exposed to a 1.0 Tesla (T) SMF in the stray fields of a 7 T MRI scanner. In some of the exposed conditions an additional TVMF of 2.4 T/s was initiated before every task by performance of head movements. A broad range of tasks was assessed testing cognitive and vestibular performance. The subjects’ test results were compared to their performance outside the magnetic field (sham condition). Exposure to MRI-related magnetic fields seemed to decrease cognitive and vestibular related performance. In particular domains including attention and concentration, verbal memory and visual (motor) functions, and postural stability have been (repeatedly) identified. An important role of the vestibular system in evoking these effects has been suggested. Therefore, a mediating role for the vestibular system was investigated. Responsiveness of the vestibular system did not modify cognitive and oculomotor test performance upon exposure to MRI-related magnetic fields. However, a weak but significant indication was demonstrated for a modified postural stability by vestibular asymmetry upon exposure. Moreover, we demonstrated that behavioral response patterns on cognitive, postural and oculomotor tasks during exposure to an MRI-related stray magnetic field did not resemble those after direct stimulation of the vestibular organ by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS). Therefore, we cannot confirm nor exclude that the vestibular system plays a (mediating) role in MRI-related magnetic field induced behavioral changes. Several hypotheses for endpoint-specific underlying mechanisms have been generated; magnetic field induced Lorentz forces in the vestibular organ, movement-induced electromagnetic induction when present in the magnetic fields, sensory conflict/weighting theory between received visual and vestibular information, and limited information processing capacity following an overflow of information to be processed. These proposed underlying mechanisms are specific for different behavioral endpoints. In conclusion, the magnitude of the found changes in behavioral performance by magnetic field of 1.0 T and 2.4 T/s is small but of serious significance. Given the trend of scanning at ultrahigh field strengths (7 T… Advisors/Committee Members: Kromhout, J., Kingma, H., Slottje, P., Zandvoort, M.J.E. van.

Subjects/Keywords: MRI; magnet fields; cognition; vestibular system; oculomotor function; exposure; working mechanisms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nierop, L. E. v. (2015). The Magnetized Brain : Working mechanisms for the effects of MRI-related magnetic fields on cognition, postural stability, and oculomotor function. (Doctoral Dissertation). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/313552

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nierop, L E van. “The Magnetized Brain : Working mechanisms for the effects of MRI-related magnetic fields on cognition, postural stability, and oculomotor function.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/313552.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nierop, L E van. “The Magnetized Brain : Working mechanisms for the effects of MRI-related magnetic fields on cognition, postural stability, and oculomotor function.” 2015. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Nierop LEv. The Magnetized Brain : Working mechanisms for the effects of MRI-related magnetic fields on cognition, postural stability, and oculomotor function. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/313552.

Council of Science Editors:

Nierop LEv. The Magnetized Brain : Working mechanisms for the effects of MRI-related magnetic fields on cognition, postural stability, and oculomotor function. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2015. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/313552

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