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You searched for +publisher:"U of Denver" +contributor:("Wyndol C. Furman, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Young, Brennan J. Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress and Depression.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, U of Denver

Dating aggression is common among emerging adults, and women who experience aggression from a dating partner are at risk for elevated depression and posttraumatic stress (Dutton et al., 2006). Although some women end their relationships as a result of aggression, other women remain committed to their partner, and aggression tends to escalate over time. The current study explored the role that depression and posttraumatic stress play in ending aggressive dating relationships as well as changes in these symptoms after ending such a relationship. The current study also sought to identify factors predictive of individual differences in emerging adults' commitment to their aggressive dating relationships. A sample of 148 emerging adult women currently in an aggressive dating relationship completed questionnaires about themselves and their relationship; measures of rejection sensitivity, self-worth, and romantic relational style were included as predictors of the Investment Model variables (e.g., investment, satisfaction, quality of alternatives, and commitment; Rusbult, 1980). Two assessments were completed six months apart. Neither depression nor posttraumatic stress predicted ending an aggressive relationship. However, ending an aggressive relationship was associated with experiencing less physical aggression, which mediated reductions in posttraumatic stress. A more avoidant romantic style indirectly predicted commitment through relationship satisfaction and investment. Both commitment and rejection sensitivity significantly predicted continuing an aggressive relationship six months later. Advisors/Committee Members: Wyndol C. Furman, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Attachment; Commitment; Dating Violence; Depression; Post-Traumatic Stress; Rejection Sensitivity; Animal Studies; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Young, B. J. (2011). Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress and Depression. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/957

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Young, Brennan J. “Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress and Depression.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed April 23, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/957.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Young, Brennan J. “Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress and Depression.” 2011. Web. 23 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Young BJ. Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress and Depression. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 23]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/957.

Council of Science Editors:

Young BJ. Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress and Depression. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2011. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/957

2. McDunn, Christine C. Relational Financial Satisfaction of Cohabiting Couples.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2009, U of Denver

The current study tested a model of factors affecting cohabiting couples' relational financial satisfaction, defined as the contentment an individual has with how financial issues are handled within his or her domestic romantic relationship, and examined the relations within these factors. This study was a cross-sectional online survey of 266 participants (81% female; 85% Caucasian) recruited from listservs and subsequent snowball sampling. Measures assessed couples' financial strain, dedication commitment, financial conflict, financial trust, financial equality and financial communication. Relational financial satisfaction (RFS) was significantly related to financial conflict, financial strain and dedication commitment. Financial conflict mediated the association between financial trust and RFS, as well as between financial communication and RFS. Financial trust and communication mediated the association between financial equality and financial conflict. In addition, RFS was related to but distinct from relationship satisfaction. This study revealed components important to consider in the assessment and treatment of couples' financial relationships. Advisors/Committee Members: Wyndol C. Furman, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Cohabitation; Couples; Financial Conflict; Financial Satisfaction; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McDunn, C. C. (2009). Relational Financial Satisfaction of Cohabiting Couples. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/875

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McDunn, Christine C. “Relational Financial Satisfaction of Cohabiting Couples.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed April 23, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/875.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McDunn, Christine C. “Relational Financial Satisfaction of Cohabiting Couples.” 2009. Web. 23 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

McDunn CC. Relational Financial Satisfaction of Cohabiting Couples. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2009. [cited 2019 Apr 23]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/875.

Council of Science Editors:

McDunn CC. Relational Financial Satisfaction of Cohabiting Couples. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2009. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/875

3. Flansburg, Claire Stephenson. Patterns and Predictors of Stability and Change in Representations of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence and Young Adulthood.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2015, U of Denver

Research on the stability of attachment representations across the lifespan has led to two alternative perspectives: the prototype and revisionist perspectives (Fraley, 2002). The prototype perspective posits that there is a stable factor underlying fluctuations in representations and the revisionist perspective argues that there is no inherently stable factor. The current study employed a latent trait-state model to investigate these alternative models of stability and change in representations of romantic relationships in adolescence and young adulthood. The study also sought to identify individual characteristics and relationship experiences that are associated with changes in representations. In a sample of 200 participants, representations were assessed by interview and self-report over seven measurement occasions between ages 15 and 23. Results were consistent with the prototype perspective emphasizing that a stable, latent factor exerts a consistent influence over the lifespan. In addition to a stable component, representations incorporated a component that varies over time. Findings showed that this fluctuating component of representations was associated with internalizing and externalizing symptomatology as well as experiences of support and negative interaction in relationships. Advisors/Committee Members: Wyndol C. Furman, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescence; Attachment; Romantic Relationships; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Flansburg, C. S. (2015). Patterns and Predictors of Stability and Change in Representations of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence and Young Adulthood. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/1023

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Flansburg, Claire Stephenson. “Patterns and Predictors of Stability and Change in Representations of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence and Young Adulthood.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed April 23, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/1023.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Flansburg, Claire Stephenson. “Patterns and Predictors of Stability and Change in Representations of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence and Young Adulthood.” 2015. Web. 23 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Flansburg CS. Patterns and Predictors of Stability and Change in Representations of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence and Young Adulthood. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 23]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/1023.

Council of Science Editors:

Flansburg CS. Patterns and Predictors of Stability and Change in Representations of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence and Young Adulthood. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2015. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/1023

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