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You searched for +publisher:"U of Denver" +contributor:("Keith E. Miller, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Sun, Miao. The Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Wet-Air Oxidation.

Degree: MS, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2013, U of Denver

The ubiquitous occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in aquatic environments has raised concerns about potential adverse effects on aquatic ecology and human health. Certain pharmaceuticals have recently become a major focus of research to better understand the routes and persistence of these compounds once they enter into aquatic system. In this research, two model compounds were selected to represent pharmaceuticals that have been identified by recent research as being persistent; specifically, these compounds were trimethoprim (TMP, a basic antibiotic) and gemfibrozil (GEM, an acidic lipid regulator). Treatment of synthetic wastewater that contained these drugs was accomplished using wet-air oxidation (WAO). Pre- and post-treatment drug concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The influences of different operational conditions on removal efficiency of the drugs by WAO were evaluated, namely reaction time, initial drug concentration, oxygen concentration, and the amount and composition of additional organic matter used during WAO. The optimum removal efficiencies were found to be 91.9 % for TMP and 95.5 % for GEM. Advisors/Committee Members: Keith E. Miller, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Gemfibrozil; Trimethoprim; VTR; Wastewater; Wet-Air Oxidation; Chemistry; Water Resource Management

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APA (6th Edition):

Sun, M. (2013). The Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Wet-Air Oxidation. (Thesis). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/936

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Miao. “The Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Wet-Air Oxidation.” 2013. Thesis, U of Denver. Accessed February 18, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/936.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Miao. “The Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Wet-Air Oxidation.” 2013. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Sun M. The Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Wet-Air Oxidation. [Internet] [Thesis]. U of Denver; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/936.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sun M. The Removal of Pharmaceuticals from Wastewater by Wet-Air Oxidation. [Thesis]. U of Denver; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/936

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Schmidt, Morgan Steele. Plasma Spectroscopic Techniques Applied to Biological and Environmental Matrices.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2012, U of Denver

The purpose of this research was to apply the use of direct ablation plasma spectroscopic techniques, including spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SIBS) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), to a variety of environmental matrices. These were applied to two different analytical problems. SIBS instrumentation was adapted in order to develop a fieldable monitor for the measurement of carbon in soil. SIBS spectra in the 200 nm to 400 nm region of several soils were collected, and the neutral carbon line (247.85 nm) was compared to total carbon concentration determined by standard dry combustion analysis. Additionally, Fe and Si were evaluated in a multivariate model in order to determine their impacts on the model's predictive power for total carbon concentrations. The results indicate that SIBS is a viable method to quantify total carbon levels in soils; obtaining a good correlation between measured and predicated carbon in soils. These results indicate that multivariate analysis can be used to construct a calibration model for SIBS soil spectra, and SIBS is a promising method for the determination of total soil carbon. SIBS was also applied to the study of biological warfare agent simulants. Elemental compositions (determined independently) of bioaerosol samples were compared to the SIBS atomic (Ca, Al, Fe and Si) and molecular (CN, N2 and OH) emission signals. Results indicate a linear relationship between the temporally integrated emission strength and the concentration of the associated element. Finally, LIBS signals of hematite were analyzed under low pressures of pure CO2 and compared with signals acquired with a mixture of CO2, N2 and Ar, which is representative of the Martian atmosphere. This research was in response to the potential use of LIBS instrumentation on the Martian surface and to the challenges associated with these measurements. Changes in Ca, Fe and Al lineshapes observed in the LIBS spectra at different gas compositions and pressures were studied. It was observed that the size of the plasma formed on the hematite changed in a non-linear way as a function of decreasing pressure in a CO2 atmosphere and a simulated Martian atmosphere. Advisors/Committee Members: Keith E. Miller, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Analytical Chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Schmidt, M. S. (2012). Plasma Spectroscopic Techniques Applied to Biological and Environmental Matrices. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/921

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schmidt, Morgan Steele. “Plasma Spectroscopic Techniques Applied to Biological and Environmental Matrices.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed February 18, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/921.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schmidt, Morgan Steele. “Plasma Spectroscopic Techniques Applied to Biological and Environmental Matrices.” 2012. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Schmidt MS. Plasma Spectroscopic Techniques Applied to Biological and Environmental Matrices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/921.

Council of Science Editors:

Schmidt MS. Plasma Spectroscopic Techniques Applied to Biological and Environmental Matrices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2012. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/921

3. Sorauf, Kellen John. A Hydrodynamic Method For Measuring Aqueous Nanoparticle Surface Interactions.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2012, U of Denver

The objectives of this research dissertation were to develop and present novel analytical methods for the quantification of surface binding interactions between aqueous nanoparticles and water-soluble organic solutes. Quantification of nanoparticle surface interactions are presented in this work as association constants where the solutes have interacted with the surface of the nanoparticles. By understanding these nanoparticle-solute interactions, in part through association constants, the scientific community will better understand how organic drugs and nanomaterials interact in the environment, as well as to understand their eventual environmental fate. The biological community, pharmaceutical, and consumer product industries also have vested interests in nanoparticle-drug interactions for nanoparticle toxicity research and in using nanomaterials as drug delivery vesicles. The presented novel analytical methods, applied to nanoparticle surface association chemistry, may prove to be useful in assisting the scientific community to understand the risks, benefits, and opportunities of nanoparticles. The development of the analytical methods presented uses a model nanoparticle, Laponite-RD (LRD). LRD was the proposed nanoparticle used to model the system and technique because of its size, 25 nm in diameter. The solutes selected to model for these studies were chosen because they are also environmentally important. Caffeine, oxytetracycline (OTC), and quinine were selected to use as models because of their environmental importance and chemical properties that can be exploited in the system. All of these chemicals are found in the environment; thus, how they interact with nanoparticles and are transported through the environment is important. The analytical methods developed utilize and a wide-bore hydrodynamic chromatography to induce a partial hydrodynamic separation between nanoparticles and dissolved solutes. Then, using deconvolution techniques, two separate elution profiles for the nanoparticle and organic solute can be obtained. Followed by a mass balance approach, association constants between LRD, our model nanoparticle, and organic solutes are calculated. These findings are the first of their kind for LRD and nanoclays in dilute dispersions. Advisors/Committee Members: Keith E. Miller, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Chromatography; HPLC; Hydrodynamic; Laponite-RD; Nanoparticle; Wide-bore; Analytical Chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sorauf, K. J. (2012). A Hydrodynamic Method For Measuring Aqueous Nanoparticle Surface Interactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/932

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sorauf, Kellen John. “A Hydrodynamic Method For Measuring Aqueous Nanoparticle Surface Interactions.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed February 18, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/932.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sorauf, Kellen John. “A Hydrodynamic Method For Measuring Aqueous Nanoparticle Surface Interactions.” 2012. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Sorauf KJ. A Hydrodynamic Method For Measuring Aqueous Nanoparticle Surface Interactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/932.

Council of Science Editors:

Sorauf KJ. A Hydrodynamic Method For Measuring Aqueous Nanoparticle Surface Interactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2012. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/932

.