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You searched for +publisher:"U of Denver" +contributor:("Erin Willer"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Shimkowski, Jenna. Young Adult Children’s Communicative Management of Emotions about Divorce and Divorce Disclosures: Creating and Applying a New Measure.

Degree: PhD, Human Communications, 2015, U of Denver

Although scholars have examined the impacts of divorce on children, there has been little research focused on how children communicatively manage and make sense of their emotions following the divorce. Theoretically, the communication field is lacking in the knowledge of ways in which children of divorce handle the emotions that can arise in their new family system. This dissertation consists of two studies. Study 1 included identifying the strategies that young adult children report using to manage their emotions regarding parents’ divorce and creating a new measure based on children’s reports of these management strategies. Young adults reported using verbal expression, nonverbal expression, and unresponsiveness as communicative strategies for managing their divorce-related emotions, providing three subscales for the new measure. Study 2 involved applying the measure from the first phase in a study of divorce disclosures and young adults’ mental well-being. This study examined the relationships between parents’ divorce disclosures, young adults’ emotion management strategies, and their mental well-being in terms of their perceived stress, self-esteem, and mental health symptoms. Results indicated that the more frequently parents disclose about their divorce, the more likely young adults use verbal expression to directly state their feelings and thoughts when managing their emotions. While divorce disclosures and young adults’ mental well-being did not share a statistically significant relationship, all three strategies were meaningfully related to mental well-being. Thus, young adults’ mental well-being increases as they utilize verbal expression but decreases the more they use nonverbal expression (e.g., facial expressions and body language) and unresponsiveness (e.g., leaving the room or sitting silently). Finally, results indicated that emotion management strategies did not function as a moderator of the relationship between divorce disclosures and young adults’ mental well-being. Potential reasons for this are explored in Study 2. These studies contribute to family communication research surrounding divorce. Whereas previous work on emotions has centered predominantly on the internal emotion regulation of feelings, the current project accounts for communication during the management of emotions in an attempt to better understand some of the difficulties children endure in divorced families and how they deal with those challenges. Advisors/Committee Members: Erin Willer.

Subjects/Keywords: Divorce; Emotion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shimkowski, J. (2015). Young Adult Children’s Communicative Management of Emotions about Divorce and Divorce Disclosures: Creating and Applying a New Measure. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/599

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shimkowski, Jenna. “Young Adult Children’s Communicative Management of Emotions about Divorce and Divorce Disclosures: Creating and Applying a New Measure.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed April 20, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/599.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shimkowski, Jenna. “Young Adult Children’s Communicative Management of Emotions about Divorce and Divorce Disclosures: Creating and Applying a New Measure.” 2015. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Shimkowski J. Young Adult Children’s Communicative Management of Emotions about Divorce and Divorce Disclosures: Creating and Applying a New Measure. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/599.

Council of Science Editors:

Shimkowski J. Young Adult Children’s Communicative Management of Emotions about Divorce and Divorce Disclosures: Creating and Applying a New Measure. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2015. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/599

2. McCullough, Amy. Social Support and Affectionate Communication in Animal-assisted Interventions: Toward a Typology and Rating Scheme of Handler/Dog Messages.

Degree: PhD, Human Communications, 2014, U of Denver

Animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) are a treatment modality that incorporates a trained animal into a person's healing and learning process in order to benefit the person physically, emotionally and/or socially (Delta Society, 1996). From an interactional perspective, two mechanisms that may contribute to these health benefits are social support and affection exchange. Although there is growing evidence of the health and well-being benefits of AAIs, there remains a need for scientific research to understand more precisely the communicative and behavioral components that constitute a therapeutic intervention involving an animal (Kazdin, 2010). Additionally, there is a need to develop a means of systematic evaluation of the interaction in order to determine the extent of support that various messages from the handler and therapy dog can offer. As such, the present study explored the interactions that occurred during AAIs by applying the theoretical frameworks of social support and affectionate communication. Two methods of data collection - interviews and observations - were employed to uncover the supportive and affectionate behaviors that occur in AAIs from a handler's perspective. Participants were primarily female, middle-aged, Caucasian therapy dog handlers who visit in a variety of facility types (e.g., hospitals, schools, nursing homes), representing a diverse range of clients and settings. Results include a typology of supportive messages. The findings of the present study indicate that handlers and therapy dogs enact six categories of supportive behaviors during AAIs - Responsiveness, Attention, Encouragement, Facilitation, Dog Interest, and Dog Affection. In addition, a rating scale based on this typology was developed. Analyses indicated that the measurement tool can be used to reliably assess the level or degree of supportive communication that a handler/dog provides during an AAI. The present study extends social support and affectionate communication theoretical frameworks to a unique interpersonal context by examining interactive supportive processes during AAIs. Although the observations in this study were conducted in only three local facilities, when combined with nationwide interview findings, this study provides scaffolding for future research to determine how particular supportive behaviors may correlate to human health and well-being outcomes. This study takes the first step in this direction by identifying and assessing supportive and affectionate behaviors that occur during AAIs so that they can next be examined and improved in order to making human-animal interventions even more effective. Advisors/Committee Members: Erin Willer, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Affection exchange; Animal assisted intervention; Social support; Therapy dog; Animal-Assisted Therapy; Communication; Mental and Social Health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCullough, A. (2014). Social Support and Affectionate Communication in Animal-assisted Interventions: Toward a Typology and Rating Scheme of Handler/Dog Messages. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Denver. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/417

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCullough, Amy. “Social Support and Affectionate Communication in Animal-assisted Interventions: Toward a Typology and Rating Scheme of Handler/Dog Messages.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Denver. Accessed April 20, 2019. https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/417.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCullough, Amy. “Social Support and Affectionate Communication in Animal-assisted Interventions: Toward a Typology and Rating Scheme of Handler/Dog Messages.” 2014. Web. 20 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

McCullough A. Social Support and Affectionate Communication in Animal-assisted Interventions: Toward a Typology and Rating Scheme of Handler/Dog Messages. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Denver; 2014. [cited 2019 Apr 20]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/417.

Council of Science Editors:

McCullough A. Social Support and Affectionate Communication in Animal-assisted Interventions: Toward a Typology and Rating Scheme of Handler/Dog Messages. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Denver; 2014. Available from: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/417

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