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You searched for +publisher:"Tulane University" +contributor:("Kolker, Alexander"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Tulane University

1. Ramatchandirane, Cyndhia. Coastal marsh formation and its relation to sediment exchange along the Chenier Plain in southwest Louisiana.

Degree: 2013, Tulane University

It is well recognized that rivers are the primary pathway that delivers sediment to the ocean. However, the fate of these sediments is poorly understood, and is complicated by relative sea level rise and meteorological forcings. One coastal system to examine these issues is the Atchafalaya River-Chenier Plain (ARCP) of southwest Louisiana, which relies on Mississippi River sediment supply and is vulnerable to coastal erosion and land loss. Despite regional coastal degradation, some land gain and marsh growth have been observed here. Land gain in south Louisiana is generally observed at the mouths of the rivers – the Bird’s Foot, and the Atchafalaya and Wax Lake deltas. However, satellite imagery and sedimentological analyses indicate that coastal lakes in southwest Louisiana have also filled in and converted into salt marshes in the last 40 years. To understand sediment delivery in these marshes, multiple short cores were collected in a central Chenier Plain tidal creek system, and analyzed for 210Pb, 137Cs, 7Be, δ13C, and grain size distribution. We propose that Chenier Plain reactivation processes are triggered by the increase in Atchafalaya River flow that began in the early 1900s. Fluvial sediments delivered through westward longshore transport and resuspended during energetic events become available to the sediment-starved Chenier coast, leading to deposition, infilling, mudflat progradation, and marsh growth.

Advisors/Committee Members: Kolker, Alexander (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Atchafalaya; Marsh; Sediment; School of Science & Engineering; Earth and Environmental Sciences; Masters

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramatchandirane, C. (2013). Coastal marsh formation and its relation to sediment exchange along the Chenier Plain in southwest Louisiana. (Masters Thesis). Tulane University. Retrieved from https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:25513

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramatchandirane, Cyndhia. “Coastal marsh formation and its relation to sediment exchange along the Chenier Plain in southwest Louisiana.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Tulane University. Accessed April 10, 2021. https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:25513.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramatchandirane, Cyndhia. “Coastal marsh formation and its relation to sediment exchange along the Chenier Plain in southwest Louisiana.” 2013. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ramatchandirane C. Coastal marsh formation and its relation to sediment exchange along the Chenier Plain in southwest Louisiana. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Tulane University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:25513.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramatchandirane C. Coastal marsh formation and its relation to sediment exchange along the Chenier Plain in southwest Louisiana. [Masters Thesis]. Tulane University; 2013. Available from: https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:25513


Tulane University

2. Chambers, Ciara R. Spatial And Temporal Variability Of Benthic Respiration In A Developing Deltaic Estuary (wax Lake Delta, Louisiana).

Degree: 2014, Tulane University

The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) is one of the few areas of land gain in coastal Louisiana and provides an analog for a naturally developing subdelta created by a river diversion. This study examined the spatial and temporal variability of benthic respiration to broaden our current understanding of the biogeochemical functioning of diversion-created estuarine systems. Spatial and seasonal benthic respiration rates were quantified during distinct periods of discharge and water temperature conditions, which included a spring period of peak river discharge (May 2012, 2013), a summer period of low discharge and maximum seasonal water temperatures (August/Sept, 2012), and an autumn period of low discharge and intermediate water temperatures (October 2013). Benthic respiration rates for the Wax Lake Delta ranged from 4.4 – 46.8 and averaged 16.7 (± 1.5) mmol O2 m-2 d-1 . Atchafalaya Bay sites ranged from 10.3 - 26.5 and averaged 17.1 (± 1.5) mmol O2 m-2 d-1 across all sites and seasons. Benthic respiration generally increased along two spatial gradients: 1) with distance offshore from the delta into Atchafalaya Bay, and 2) toward the interior of a mouth bar island. These patterns were related to similar increases in sediment OC and N content, which were derived from a mix of terrigenous and marine sources and varied with season. Sediment organic (OC and N) content and water temperature were identified as main drivers influencing benthic respiration in the Wax Lake Delta estuary. Seasonal changes in riverine discharge and wind-driven sediment resuspension events were likely to influence the seasonal variability of benthic respiration by governing water temperature and organic matter supply to the sediments. Benthic oxygen consumption rates in the Wax Lake Delta were most sensitive to increases in water temperature during low discharge conditions (< 2,000 m3 /s) of the MI-AR system. In context of coastal restoration, results from this study suggest that opening a sediment diversion during spring peak discharge conditions will have less of an effect on benthic oxygen consumption rates than during warmer low flow conditions.

Advisors/Committee Members: Kolker, Alexander (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Benthic Respiration; Deltas; Biogeochemistry; School of Science & Engineering; Earth and Environmental Sciences; Masters

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chambers, C. R. (2014). Spatial And Temporal Variability Of Benthic Respiration In A Developing Deltaic Estuary (wax Lake Delta, Louisiana). (Masters Thesis). Tulane University. Retrieved from https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:27844

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chambers, Ciara R. “Spatial And Temporal Variability Of Benthic Respiration In A Developing Deltaic Estuary (wax Lake Delta, Louisiana).” 2014. Masters Thesis, Tulane University. Accessed April 10, 2021. https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:27844.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chambers, Ciara R. “Spatial And Temporal Variability Of Benthic Respiration In A Developing Deltaic Estuary (wax Lake Delta, Louisiana).” 2014. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Chambers CR. Spatial And Temporal Variability Of Benthic Respiration In A Developing Deltaic Estuary (wax Lake Delta, Louisiana). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Tulane University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:27844.

Council of Science Editors:

Chambers CR. Spatial And Temporal Variability Of Benthic Respiration In A Developing Deltaic Estuary (wax Lake Delta, Louisiana). [Masters Thesis]. Tulane University; 2014. Available from: https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:27844


Tulane University

3. Keogh, Margaret. Accretion, compaction, and restoration: Sediment dynamics and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands.

Degree: 2019, Tulane University

[email protected]

Over the past two centuries, coastal wetlands have become increasingly threatened by accelerated relative sea-level rise and anthropogenic modification. Engineered structures such as sea walls, levees, and drainage systems prevent natural processes of sediment distribution, reducing the resilience of coastal ecosystems. Land subsidence and shoreline erosion combine with global sea-level rise to make low-elevation coastal zones increasingly vulnerable to submergence. This dissertation examines processes of sediment accumulation, compaction, and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands and assesses strategies for restoration. I find that organic content strongly controls sediment compaction in wetland sediments. At least 80% of compaction happens quickly, largely within the first 100 years after deposition and in the top 1 m of the subsurface. This rapid shallow compaction is generally not recorded by traditional methods of measuring relative sea-level rise in low-elevation coastal zones (i.e., tide gauges and global navigation satellite systems). As a result, tide gauges generally underestimate rates of relative sea-level rise in low-elevation coastal zones and these areas may be at a greater risk of flooding than previously realized. However, despite accelerated rates of relative sea-level rise and rapid sediment compaction, coastal restoration efforts such as river diversions can be successful in building new land in some areas. I find that sediment deposition responds non-linearly to water discharge, reaching a maximum at moderate discharge. Wetlands are more likely to keep up with relative sea-level rise if hydrodynamic conditions are optimized to retain mineral sediment in targeted restoration areas.

1

Margaret Keogh

Advisors/Committee Members: Kolker, Alexander (Thesis advisor), Törnqvist, Torbjörn (Thesis advisor), School of Science & Engineering Earth and Environmental Sciences (Degree granting institution).

Subjects/Keywords: Coastal wetlands; Sediment compaction; Mississippi Delta

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keogh, M. (2019). Accretion, compaction, and restoration: Sediment dynamics and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands. (Thesis). Tulane University. Retrieved from https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:92021

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keogh, Margaret. “Accretion, compaction, and restoration: Sediment dynamics and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands.” 2019. Thesis, Tulane University. Accessed April 10, 2021. https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:92021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keogh, Margaret. “Accretion, compaction, and restoration: Sediment dynamics and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands.” 2019. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Keogh M. Accretion, compaction, and restoration: Sediment dynamics and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands. [Internet] [Thesis]. Tulane University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:92021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Keogh M. Accretion, compaction, and restoration: Sediment dynamics and relative sea-level rise in coastal wetlands. [Thesis]. Tulane University; 2019. Available from: https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane:92021

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.