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You searched for +publisher:"The Ohio State University" +contributor:("Owens, Douglas T."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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The Ohio State University

1. Moore, David M. How the Visually Impaired View and Experience Mathematics in School.

Degree: MA, EDU Teaching and Learning, 2008, The Ohio State University

This study investigates how the blind need mathematics communicated to them. Considerable evidence exists that learning strategies such as discussion, group learning, and speaking in the mathematics classroom greatly aid the sighted in learning and understanding mathematics. The researcher wanted to determine whether or not these same strategies benefit the blind as much as the sighted. The researcher wanted to determine how crucial it is for the blind to have all mathematics materials in Braille and other tactile forms. The researcher also studied whether or not blind students eventually consider a mathematics related career.To conduct this study, the researcher interviewed eight adult, blind participants who took mathematics in school as a blind student. The researcher read a recruitment script to a potential subject before the interview began. Based on the information gathered from the interviews, results were established concerning what the participants believed concerning how they would have best learned and understood mathematics. In addition, conclusions were drawn concerning how the blind need mathematics communicated to them; what class environment is best; and what accommodations the blind need to best flourish in mathematics.The results show that it was important for the participants, who were blind as a child, to be taught mathematics through the eighth grade by a special education teacher for the blind in a small resource room setting. Because of the small classroom size in this setting, the strategies that help the sighted were used by the special education teacher for the blind. The participants said that when they were put into the regular high school classroom, these strategies such as working in groups, class discussion, and speaking about mathematics were no longer used in the high school classroom environment. This was when they became lost in mathematics, and they no longer enjoyed this subject. In addition, their special education teacher for the blind knew how to convert all mathematics materials into Nemeth code Braille. Participants said that they needed to be able to read and write mathematics in Braille to learn and understand this subject. In addition, the participants said that it was crucial for them to have all visual representations of figures, graphs, and tables in a raised tactile form. Most participants said that as blind students they would have appreciated mathematics more if real-life applications had been implemented into the curriculum. A few of the participants said that they would have considered a mathematics related career if experts in different fields had come into the classroom and talked about how they applied mathematics on their jobs.The conclusions of this research show that the blind will indeed benefit from the same learning strategies that help the sighted such as class discussion, group learning, and speaking in mathematics class. In addition, the blind need to have all materials in Braille in order to learn mathematics. It is important that the blind be taught… Advisors/Committee Members: Owens, Douglas T. (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Mathematics Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moore, D. M. (2008). How the Visually Impaired View and Experience Mathematics in School. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1396453258

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moore, David M. “How the Visually Impaired View and Experience Mathematics in School.” 2008. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1396453258.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moore, David M. “How the Visually Impaired View and Experience Mathematics in School.” 2008. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Moore DM. How the Visually Impaired View and Experience Mathematics in School. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1396453258.

Council of Science Editors:

Moore DM. How the Visually Impaired View and Experience Mathematics in School. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1396453258


The Ohio State University

2. Meagher, Michael. The processes of learning in a computer algebra system (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus.

Degree: PhD, Educational Theory and Practice, 2005, The Ohio State University

This study is a qualitative case study focusing on the question “What are the processes of learning in a Computer Algebra System (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus?” The study is designed to research the impact on student learning of new and revolutionary software available for mathematics education. Research in CAS has focused on outcome-based studies and more philosophical work on the curriculum and assessment implications of CAS. Missing are studies which look at what exactly happens when students try to learn mathematics in a CAS environment: What does CAS learning look like on a day-to-day basis? and What does CAS learning look like across the period of a ten-week course? The importance of investigating these processes lies in understanding the impact of CAS on learning so that an appropriate balance can be found in the integration of technology into teaching ensuring that the merits of traditional methods are not lost and that the merits and demerits of CAS use are fully understood. The primary data for the study consists of audio and video of tape of a group of students in a college course learning calculus using CAS software. This data was supplemented by interviews with the students as well as analysis of the students’ homework and tests. Analysis of the data via Rotman Model of Mathematical Understanding provides a lens through which to view the place of technology in the CAS classroom and through which to view the journey of each student across the quarter. The Pirie-Kieren Model for the Growth of Mathematical Understanding is then mobilised as a lens through which to examine specific learning episodes as they occur in the classroom. As well as providing examples of student learning, the broader conclusions of the study are (i) that the framing and introduction of technology at the beginning of an instruction period impacts crucially on student behaviour and use of technology throughout that period and (ii) that while students will naturally experiment in a CAS environment intervention is probably required for them to develop sophistication in their experimental behaviour and strategies. Advisors/Committee Members: Owens, Douglas T, Voithofer, Richard (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Computer Algebra Systems (CAS); Mathematics Education; Technology; Mathematica

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meagher, M. (2005). The processes of learning in a computer algebra system (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1124113975

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meagher, Michael. “The processes of learning in a computer algebra system (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1124113975.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meagher, Michael. “The processes of learning in a computer algebra system (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus.” 2005. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Meagher M. The processes of learning in a computer algebra system (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2005. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1124113975.

Council of Science Editors:

Meagher M. The processes of learning in a computer algebra system (CAS) environment for college students learning calculus. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2005. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1124113975

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