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You searched for +publisher:"The Ohio State University" +contributor:("McCann, Eugene"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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The Ohio State University

1. Bodaar, Annemarie. Cities and the “Multicultural State”: Immigration, Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods, and the Socio-Spatial Negotiation of Policy in the Netherlands.

Degree: PhD, Geography, 2008, The Ohio State University

Immigration is widely acknowledged to be a major social issue in Western European countries. In this context, the Netherlands was one of the few countries to commit itself to the ideal of a ‘multicultural state’. While this policy ideal was intended to maintain the coherence of the increasingly multi-ethnic state, alleviate growing fear and suspicion of immigrants among sections of Dutch society, and overcome growing ethnic segregation in major cities, its implementation has produced a number of contradictions, however. There has been both a massive political shift in favor of anti-immigrant parties, and increases in segregation in the big cities. In this context the Nethelands has recently reconsidered its multicultural programs. While assimilation is gaining ground as the dominant discourse of immigrant integration in a number of liberal states, the Netherlands has experienced the most profound change away from multiculturalism. Dutch cities therefore could be considered laboratories for the analysis of changes in the way state actors and residents across the world are negotiating immigrant incorporation. This dissertation explores how policies aimed at immigrant integration developed, were implemented and how they were negotiated when implemented in specific multi-ethnic neighborhoods and its effects for neighborhoods, cities and the nation. Using a mixed-methods approach – with a qualitative focus – this research contributes to our understanding of the multicultural city. Central to the research is the governmentality approach, providing a framework through which to analyze the uneven geographies of policy implementation. Several findings from my research stand out. First, an analysis of state policy documents shows that integration is demanded only of ‘ethnic minorities’ who are perceived to be a threat for social stability of the nation-state. Secondly, local political and economic context shapes the way negotiation strategies are being developed. In Rotterdam Delfshaven multi-ethnic bonds were created through informal networks, while in Amsterdam Zuidoost immigrant residents used formal ways to secure the inclusion of immigrant residents in neighborhood decision-making processes. Finally, the micro-scale segregated use of squares does create familiarity and acceptance, and in so doing can contribute to changes in attitude and behavior towards immigrants. Advisors/Committee Members: McCann, Eugene (Committee Chair), Kwan, Mei-Po (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Geography; immigration; multiculturalism; geography; the Netherlands; multi-ethnic neighborhoods; urban policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bodaar, A. (2008). Cities and the “Multicultural State”: Immigration, Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods, and the Socio-Spatial Negotiation of Policy in the Netherlands. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1217969640

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bodaar, Annemarie. “Cities and the “Multicultural State”: Immigration, Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods, and the Socio-Spatial Negotiation of Policy in the Netherlands.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1217969640.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bodaar, Annemarie. “Cities and the “Multicultural State”: Immigration, Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods, and the Socio-Spatial Negotiation of Policy in the Netherlands.” 2008. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Bodaar A. Cities and the “Multicultural State”: Immigration, Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods, and the Socio-Spatial Negotiation of Policy in the Netherlands. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1217969640.

Council of Science Editors:

Bodaar A. Cities and the “Multicultural State”: Immigration, Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods, and the Socio-Spatial Negotiation of Policy in the Netherlands. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1217969640


The Ohio State University

2. Starkweather, Sarah Irene. Perceptions of Safety and the Rights to Space: Limitations and Strategic Responses.

Degree: Master of City and Regional Planning, City and Regional Planning, 2002, The Ohio State University

Using a mixed qualitative approach, and focusing on the experiences of undergraduates at The Ohio State University, three research questions were addressed. First, what characteristics of individuals, situations and locations influence individuals’ perceptions of safety? Second, how do perceptions of safety influence the use of campus spaces? Third, what strategies do individuals choose to counteract limitations on their use of space that may be imposed by perceptions of safety? Data were collected through two methods: the self¬-administered questionnaire and the semi-structured interview.Many factors influenced respondents’ perceptions of safety. Adequate lighting and the presence of others, various campus security measures, and the supposed isolation of campus from the surrounding city make students feel safer. Other influential factors included gender, race or ethnicity, physical confidence, personality, past and current places of residence, familiarity with campus, previous threatening experiences, and hearing of others being threatened. Also, certain places are perceived to be safer than others because of specific design features, reputation, or both.Perceptions of personal safety may limit students’ (particularly female students’) access to campus spaces and, therefore, their access to certainuniversity facilities and activities. Spatial restrictions are a violation of students’ rights to space. However, many respondents displayed a tendency to downplay limitations on their use of campus space by viewing such limitations as “natural” and “smart” (especially for women).Whether or not they perceived access to campus spaces as an issue of spatial rights, students described strategies they have adopted in response to spatial limitations imposed by perceptions of safety. Three types of strategies can be identified: isolation strategies (avoiding certain places or situations); precautionary strategies (venturing into threatening spaces but compensating for a perceived lack of safety); and boldness strategies (feeling unafraid).Three key conclusions have implications for future research: a complex set of factors determines individuals’ perception of safety; spatial limitations can be viewed as an issue of rights; and there are many strategies for managing fear, including choosing not to be afraid. This research also has implications for policy-making related to making people feel safer, and to facilitating their strategic responses to perceptions of safety. Advisors/Committee Members: Nasar, Jack (Advisor), McCann, Eugene (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Civil Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Starkweather, S. I. (2002). Perceptions of Safety and the Rights to Space: Limitations and Strategic Responses. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1393194978

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Starkweather, Sarah Irene. “Perceptions of Safety and the Rights to Space: Limitations and Strategic Responses.” 2002. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1393194978.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Starkweather, Sarah Irene. “Perceptions of Safety and the Rights to Space: Limitations and Strategic Responses.” 2002. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Starkweather SI. Perceptions of Safety and the Rights to Space: Limitations and Strategic Responses. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2002. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1393194978.

Council of Science Editors:

Starkweather SI. Perceptions of Safety and the Rights to Space: Limitations and Strategic Responses. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2002. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1393194978

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