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You searched for +publisher:"The Ohio State University" +contributor:("Bednarski, Richard"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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The Ohio State University

1. Lovasz, Michael F. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, 2016, The Ohio State University

The objective of the study reported here was to determine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fentanyl in alpacas after intravenous (IV) and transdermal (TD) administration.Fentanyl was administered IV (2 mcg/kg) or TD (2 mcg/kg/hr) in 6 adult alpacas. Samples of venous blood were obtained at predetermined intervals for 24 hours after IV and 96 hours after TD administration to determine plasma concentrations using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sedation score, HR, RR, and the responses to thermal and mechanical nociception were assessed at each time point. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of fentanyl was 4.6 +/- 1.8 ng/mL after IV administration, clearance was 921 +/- 189 mL/kg/hr, volume of distribution was 4.3 +/-1.8 L/kg and elimination half-life was 3.1 hours (range 1.87-7.2 hours). Mild sedation occurred within 5 minutes of IV administration and lasted up to 45 minutes. Apparent excitement occurred in three alpacas following IV fentanyl administration. Limb mechanical threshold and abdominal algometry were significantly increased from baseline at 15 minutes and 45 minutes, respectively. Mean maximum plasma fentanyl concentration was 1.3+/- 0.8 ng/mL, mean residence time was 42 +/- 8 hours, and elimination half-life was 16.5 hours (range 10-22 hours) after TD administration. Sedation was mild in three alpacas following TD fentanyl, peaked by 24 hours and lasted up to 60 hours. Plasma fentanyl concentrations peaked and fell rapidly after IV administration. Uptake of TD fentanyl was absorption dependent, but nearly complete. The behavioral responses to IV fentanyl were inconsistent. Advisors/Committee Members: Bednarski, Richard (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Veterinary Services; Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration

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APA (6th Edition):

Lovasz, M. F. (2016). Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lovasz, Michael F. “Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration.” 2016. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lovasz, Michael F. “Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration.” 2016. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lovasz MF. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885.

Council of Science Editors:

Lovasz MF. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885

2. Lewis, Kerrie Anne. Effect of 4 Analgesic Protocols on Comfort and Sedation of Dogs for 24 hours after Stifle Surgery.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, 2013, The Ohio State University

Peri-operative and long-term pain management is essential for dogs undergoing TPLO. Combination analgesic techniques may be superior to individual techniques in dogs after stifle surgery. Pain and sedation scores were evaluated for 24 hours post-operatively in dogs undergoing TPLO surgery and assigned to 4 separate analgesia protocols. All dogs presented were chronically receiving an NSAID and NSAID administration continued post-operatively.Thirty-four dogs presented for tibia plateau leveling osteotomy (same surgeon) were randomly assigned to one of four groups (four group repeated measure ANOVA): 1) Co-infusion of morphine (0.24 mg/kg/hr), lidocaine (3 mg/kg/hr), ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/hr) (MLK) begin at induction; 2) Lumbosacral epidural containing morphine (0.2 mg/kg) and ropivacaine (0.2 mg/kg) (LE) administered post-induction and pre-surgically; 3) MLK plus LE; 4) No additional analgesic drug administration after morphine premedication. All dogs received acepromazine (0.02 – 0.1 mg/kg) and morphine (0.4 mg/kg) intramuscularly (pre-medication), propofol, and isoflurane in oxygen (depth controlled by adjusting vaporizer setting). Indices of cardiorespiratory function and isoflurane requirement were recorded at 5-minute intervals during anesthesia which included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), blood pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), end-tidal isoflurane concentration (ETISO), and vaporizer percentage of isoflurane (ISO%). Co-infusion was discontinued at the end of surgery. A validated Sedation Scoring System and the Modified Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Score were used by two blinded evaluators to assess comfort and sedation after extubation and 98°F, at 60 minute intervals for 4 hours then every 4 hours for 24 hours. Dogs with pain scores greater than 6 were given morphine rescue analgesia (0.4 mg/kg, IM).No differences in any intra-operative value; including, HR, RR, SAP, ETCO2, ETIso, and Vaporizer % were detected among groups. No differences in pain score, rescue analgesia requirement, or time to first rescue analgesia were detected. Values (mean ± SD) for groups 1,2,3 and 4 were (respectively): Pain score: 2.6 ± 1.9, 2.6 ± 1.6, 2.8 ± 1.6, and 2.8 ± 2.0. Sedation score: 6.1 ± 4.3, 5.2 ± 4.3, 7.8 ± 4.5, and 6.3 ± 4.2 Rescue analgesia was administered to 4 of 12, 4 of 12, 5 of 12, and 3 of 12 dogs in each group for groups 1,2,3, and 4, respectively. In conclusion, we found pain scores were similar among groups, and that all 4 groups had similar rescue analgesia requirements and had similar times to first rescue analgesia requirements. Because time to first rescue analgesia varied with each group we conclude that dogs undergoing TPLO surgery benefit from interval assessment of pain status throughout the 24 hour post-operative period. Advisors/Committee Members: bednarski, richard (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Veterinary Services; TPLO; pain; dogs; pain scoring; analgesia; anesthesia; veterinary

the Ohio State University 2010 to present… …Anesthesiology Resident, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lewis, K. A. (2013). Effect of 4 Analgesic Protocols on Comfort and Sedation of Dogs for 24 hours after Stifle Surgery. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366606136

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lewis, Kerrie Anne. “Effect of 4 Analgesic Protocols on Comfort and Sedation of Dogs for 24 hours after Stifle Surgery.” 2013. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366606136.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lewis, Kerrie Anne. “Effect of 4 Analgesic Protocols on Comfort and Sedation of Dogs for 24 hours after Stifle Surgery.” 2013. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lewis KA. Effect of 4 Analgesic Protocols on Comfort and Sedation of Dogs for 24 hours after Stifle Surgery. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366606136.

Council of Science Editors:

Lewis KA. Effect of 4 Analgesic Protocols on Comfort and Sedation of Dogs for 24 hours after Stifle Surgery. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2013. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366606136


The Ohio State University

3. Aarnes, Turi K. Fluid administration for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, 2009, The Ohio State University

Isoflurane is the most commonly used inhalant anesthetic in veterinary practice. Hypotension, a side effect of isoflurane anesthesia, increases morbidity and mortality. Intravenous (IV) fluid therapy is frequently proposed for correction of anesthetic-induced hypotension. The efficacy of fluid therapies for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension has not been investigated. The objective of our study was to determine the effect of the IV administration of a crystalloid (Lactated Ringer’s Solution, (LRS)) or colloid (Hetastarch, HES) on isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs. We hypothesized that IV fluid administration would correct isoflurane-induced hypotension and that HES administration would correct isoflurane-induced hypotension more rapidly, more effectively, and with a smaller volume than with LRS. Six Beagles were studied. Isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was individually determined. All dogs underwent each treatment in a random-ordered three-way cross-over design, separated by a minimum of 7 days: an infusion of HES, an infusion of LRS, and no IV fluid administration (NFA). Following propofol induction and isoflurane maintenance, dogs were instrumented. Dogs were maintained at 1.3 times MAC for an additional 30 minutes. Baseline data were collected. The isoflurane concentration was increased to achieve a systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) of 80 mmHg (time 0). The isoflurane concentration required to attain a SABP of 80 mmHg was maintained for the duration of the experiment. Fluid administration in the HES and LRS groups began at time 0 at a rate of 80 mL/kg/hr. Fluid administration was discontinued if SABP returned to within 10% of baseline. If SABP did not return to within 10% of baseline values, fluid was administered to a pre-determined maximum volume: 40 mL/kg for HES and 80 mL/kg for LRS. Heart rate, SABP, mean ABP, diastolic ABP, mean pulmonary artery pressure, right atrial pressure, cardiac output, and blood volume change (BV) were measured and recorded at baseline, time 0, and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes in all groups, and at 150 and 180 minutes in the fluid treatment groups. Blood gases, pH, lactate, electrolytes, packed cell volume (PCV), total protein (TP), albumin, colloid osmotic pressure (COP), and viscosity were determined at baseline, time 0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes, and viscosity was also determined at 180 minutes in the fluid treatment groups. Blood was collected 24 hours after recovery for hemogram, PCV, TP, lactate, viscosity, and chemical profile analysis. Cardiac index (CI) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were calculated. Administration of 80 mL/kg of LRS did not increase SABP in any dog, while administration of 40 mL/kg or less of HES increased SABP in four of six dogs. SABP, DABP, and MABP were significantly increased in dogs that received HES compared with LRS. CI increased and SVR decreased with fluid administration. Viscosity was lower in dogs that received LRS compared with HES. PCV and TP… Advisors/Committee Members: Bednarski, Richard (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: isoflurane; anesthesia; hetastarch; hypotension

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aarnes, T. K. (2009). Fluid administration for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1236023502

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aarnes, Turi K. “Fluid administration for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs.” 2009. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1236023502.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aarnes, Turi K. “Fluid administration for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs.” 2009. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Aarnes TK. Fluid administration for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1236023502.

Council of Science Editors:

Aarnes TK. Fluid administration for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1236023502

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