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You searched for +publisher:"The Catholic University of America" +contributor:("Rohlf, Michael"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Shields, Daniel P. Aquinas and the Kantian Principle of Treating Persons as Ends in Themselves.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2012, The Catholic University of America

Degree awarded: Ph.D. Philosophy. The Catholic University of America

This dissertation addresses the question of whether and on what terms Aquinas would accept Kant's principle that one must always treat all persons as ends in themselves, and never merely as means. This question is of considerable interest given the wide contemporary acceptance of Kant's principle and yet it has, to my knowledge, never received as sustained a consideration as I will give it. To answer this question I make a distinction between a finis cuius and finis cui. A finis cuius is an end in the sense of a value that is to be attained, and a finis cui is an end in the sense of someone for whom a value is to be attained. Aquinas holds that one must treat persons as ends in both of these senses. Nevertheless, no created person is a supreme finis cui or an ultimate finis cuius. For Aquinas, God is the end of the natural law and all of the moral life is ordered towards Him. "Love God with all your heart" is the primary precept of the natural law. Aquinas does not mean that the whole moral life is ordered towards one's own personal happiness with God. Such a view would involve always using other persons as mere means. Rather, God is to be loved as both the supreme finis cui and the ultimate finis cuius. God offers Himself to man as a common good and must be loved as such. This means that one must love other persons as fellow participants in the common good and as those for whom the common good is intended. This is to say that one must treat his neighbor as a finis cui. Aquinas further holds that one must love one's neighbor as oneself, that is to say, with the love of friendship. This requires valuing the other person as a finis cuius – thus wanting to be in community with him – in addition to willing his good as a finis cui. Such love perfects a natural tendency purposefully implanted in man by God and is necessary if the community is to flourish.

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Advisors/Committee Members: Hoffmann, Tobias (Advisor), Knobel, Angela (Other), Rohlf, Michael (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; Ethics; Aquinas; Dignity; God; Kant; Natural Law; Persons

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shields, D. P. (2012). Aquinas and the Kantian Principle of Treating Persons as Ends in Themselves. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/10285

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shields, Daniel P. “Aquinas and the Kantian Principle of Treating Persons as Ends in Themselves.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, The Catholic University of America. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/10285.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shields, Daniel P. “Aquinas and the Kantian Principle of Treating Persons as Ends in Themselves.” 2012. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Shields DP. Aquinas and the Kantian Principle of Treating Persons as Ends in Themselves. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Catholic University of America; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/10285.

Council of Science Editors:

Shields DP. Aquinas and the Kantian Principle of Treating Persons as Ends in Themselves. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Catholic University of America; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/10285

2. Canning, Gregory. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same: A Historical Account of Nietzsche's Philosophy of History.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2011, The Catholic University of America

Degree awarded: Ph.D. Philosophy. The Catholic University of America

The interpretation of Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophy has been a source of controversy ever since his lapse into insanity at the beginning of 1889. One aspect of his thought, in particular, has been a point of contention among scholars since the 1930s – his thought of the eternal recurrence. This is when scholars first devoted considerable attention to the difficulty of interpreting this teaching within the context of his philosophy as a whole. The works of Karl Jaspers, Martin Heidegger, and Karl Löwith were instrumental in establishing the eternal recurrence as an important part of Nietzsche's philosophy. Among the three, Löwith's interpretation of the eternal recurrence has been most influential: for Löwith, the recurrence breaks apart into two incommensurable halves, a cosmological doctrine regarding the eternity of the world and an anthropological doctrine regarding human life. These halves contradict one another and cannot be brought together to form a coherent unity – a position largely accepted in the scholarship since Löwith's time. This dissertation seeks to correct this interpretation by examining Nietzsche's works, beginning with the earliest and working its way toward his final writings (the opposite of Löwith's procedure). The result is a new interpretation of the eternal recurrence that illuminates the coherence of the doctrine. The source of the thought lies in Nietzsche's reflection on the nature of science and its detrimental influence on life in The Birth of Tragedy and, significantly, the "History" essay (1874). Nietzsche's struggle to find a life-affirming scientific position results in what he calls the "gay science," which unifies science and life in the eternal recurrence. While this thought remains central in such works as The Gay Science and Thus Spoke Zarathustra, it seems to fade to the background in his later works. Careful examination of these later works, however, demonstrates that Nietzsche's critiques of truth, science, and religion in the "revaluation of all values" are dependent on the foundation of the eternal recurrence. Reading Nietzsche's works chronologically not only yields an interpretation that demonstrates the coherence of the eternal recurrence, but also demonstrates the unity of his philosophy of history and philosophy of science.

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Advisors/Committee Members: Zaborowski, Holger (Advisor), Rohlf, Michael (Other), Hassing, Richard (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; Philosophy of Science; history; Nietzsche; science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Canning, G. (2011). The Eternal Recurrence of the Same: A Historical Account of Nietzsche's Philosophy of History. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/9710

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Canning, Gregory. “The Eternal Recurrence of the Same: A Historical Account of Nietzsche's Philosophy of History.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, The Catholic University of America. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/9710.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Canning, Gregory. “The Eternal Recurrence of the Same: A Historical Account of Nietzsche's Philosophy of History.” 2011. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Canning G. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same: A Historical Account of Nietzsche's Philosophy of History. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Catholic University of America; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/9710.

Council of Science Editors:

Canning G. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same: A Historical Account of Nietzsche's Philosophy of History. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Catholic University of America; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/9710

3. Higgins, Paul. Speaking and Thinking about God in Rosenzweig and Heidegger.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2013, The Catholic University of America

Degree awarded: Ph.D. Philosophy. The Catholic University of America

In the early twentieth century, many philosophers began to reject Kantian and Hegelian approaches to the question of God and the philosophy of religion. The challenge was then to formulate a new way of talking about God within philosophy without necessarily having to revert to pre-modern accounts. These thinkers saw the importance of retaining the insights of modernity while also taking into account the Romantic and post-Romantic critiques of modernism as a one-sided or overly rationalistic enterprise. This dissertation seeks to provide a comprehensive picture of the approaches of Franz Rosenzweig and Martin Heidegger to rethinking the question of how philosophy is to proceed, especially in light of religious phenomena. Placing Rosenzweig and Heidegger in dialogue helps to further our understanding of both figures, particularly insofar as Rosenzweig's thought might be used as a corrective to possible shortcomings in the later Heidegger. Many scholars have argued that there is something problematic about Heidegger's religious thought, but Rosenzweig has been almost completely overlooked as an important corrective resource. Both Rosenzweig's comprehensive account of the basic phenomena of human existence and his grammatical method for formulating this account share many of Heidegger's insights, yet surpass them insofar as Rosenzweig is able to address the topic in a more philosophically cogent manner. Rosenzweig's approach helps to illustrate that the mature Heidegger's de-emphasizing of divine revelation in favor of the self-revealing of Being and the "flight of the gods" is ultimately too selective an approach to the phenomena in question, and too narrow in its historical focus on German and pagan Greek thought. Rosenzweig's articulation of what he takes to be the historically concrete event of divine revelation, and the form of life that ensues therefrom, is thus a position that Heidegger should take seriously. Rosenzweig's philosophical speech-thinking serves to articulate concretely lived Biblical revelation in a way that provides a particularly helpful example of what Heidegger was grasping towards in his mature attempts to go beyond traditional metaphysical language.

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Advisors/Committee Members: Zaborowski, Holger (Advisor), McCarthy, John (Other), Rohlf, Michael (Other), Simpson, Andrew (Other), Kopar, Lilla (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; Philosophy of Religion; Religion; Franz Rosenzweig; German philosophy; Language; Martin Heidegger; Philosophy of religion; Revelation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Higgins, P. (2013). Speaking and Thinking about God in Rosenzweig and Heidegger. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/15218

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Higgins, Paul. “Speaking and Thinking about God in Rosenzweig and Heidegger.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, The Catholic University of America. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/15218.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Higgins, Paul. “Speaking and Thinking about God in Rosenzweig and Heidegger.” 2013. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Higgins P. Speaking and Thinking about God in Rosenzweig and Heidegger. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Catholic University of America; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/15218.

Council of Science Editors:

Higgins P. Speaking and Thinking about God in Rosenzweig and Heidegger. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Catholic University of America; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/15218

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