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You searched for +publisher:"The Catholic University of America" +contributor:("Koh, Eun"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Cline, Craig. Child Welfare Services: Father Perspectives on Engagement and Identity.

Degree: 2020, The Catholic University of America

For over half a century, research on father involvement has found positive outcomes for children’s cognitive development, social and emotional development, and physical health when their fathers are highly involved in their lives. Yet, within the child welfare system, fathers are frequently avoided, viewed as “all good” or “all bad,” or overlooked by child welfare workers who are focused on the mother-child dyad. These perspectives and practices persist despite the mounting evidence that father identification and engagement efforts contribute to greater financial support for children in fragile families and lead to more positive reunification outcomes for children. Recent efforts have been made to understand barriers to father engagement in the child welfare system, but there is still limited research focused on fathers’ experiences with child welfare system involvement and the effect it has on their lives. This exploratory, qualitative study examined the experience of father engagement from the perspective of fathers whose children were in foster care. In addition, this study explored the effect of father engagement on fathers’ participation in child welfare decision making processes and the effect of father engagement on father-role identity. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with four fathers who had child welfare system involvement. Identity theory was the guiding theoretical framework for this study. Interview transcripts were analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis to identity common experiences shared by the participants. Three superordinate themes emerged through data analysis: prominence of father identity, disaffection with the child welfare system, and despair. These fathers reported that their father-role identity remains their most important identity despite negative experiences with the child welfare system. These fathers’ negative experiences led to feelings of despair associated with father-role loss, and other feelings of loss, powerlessness, and hopelessness. These findings highlight the need for social workers in child welfare to engage in practice with fathers from the perspective that many fathers value their father-role identity and that it is of significant importance to them. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the child welfare system must do more to increase child welfare workers’ knowledge about the importance of father involvement, and it must also enhance workers’ skills for effectively engaging fathers in all aspects of the system. Finally, these findings emphasize the need to continue exploring child welfare involvement from the perspective of fathers so that the child welfare system can develop services for fathers that are more attuned to their specific needs and interests.

Social work

child protective services, child welfare, father engagement, father identity, identity theory, interpretative phenomenological analysis

Social Work

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Social Work. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: The Catholic University of America (Degree granting institution), Daughtery, Laura (Thesis advisor), Sabatino, Christine (Committee member), Koh, Eun (Committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: child protective services; child welfare; father engagement; father identity; identity theory; interpretative phenomenological analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cline, C. (2020). Child Welfare Services: Father Perspectives on Engagement and Identity. (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214710

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cline, Craig. “Child Welfare Services: Father Perspectives on Engagement and Identity.” 2020. Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214710.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cline, Craig. “Child Welfare Services: Father Perspectives on Engagement and Identity.” 2020. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Cline C. Child Welfare Services: Father Perspectives on Engagement and Identity. [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214710.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cline C. Child Welfare Services: Father Perspectives on Engagement and Identity. [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214710

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Johnson, Kynai. Social Identity Memberships & Critical Consciousness: A Study of Foundation Year MSW Students.

Degree: 2020, The Catholic University of America

Social inequities are experienced by individuals based upon social identity memberships including gender identity, sexual orientation, race, and socioeconomic status. Cultivating a critical consciousness, i.e., recognizing how social identity membership informs life experience, is important for social workers in effectively serving vulnerable populations experiencing such inequities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between social identity membership and the levels of critical consciousness within a population of foundation year Master of Social Work (MSW) students within the Washington D.C., Maryland and Virginia region. The study recruited 81 participants from four institutions in the region to complete an anonymous online survey. The survey collected respondents’ demographic information and utilized The Critical Consciousness Scale, developed by Diemer (2014), to measure three aspects of critical consciousness: perceptions of social inequalities, endorsement of social egalitarianism, and engagement in sociopolitical activities. Demographic information was utilized to classify respondents into target and agent identity categories. Bivariate and regression analyses were completed to compare mean levels of critical consciousness between target and agent social identity memberships, and to investigate whether social identity membership significantly predicts the levels of critical consciousness while controlling for the effects of participants’ socioeconomic status and institutional affiliations. The results of bivariate analyses indicate that the association between target and agent identity classifications and levels of critical consciousness vary depending on the dimensions of participants’ identity membership. The findings from the hierarchical regression analyses showed that participants’ identity membership only predicted the levels of engagement in sociopolitical activities. Further investigation is needed to determine other factors that may contribute to the levels of critical consciousness. This study implies that systematized, curriculum-based cultural competency standards can mitigate the influence of external factors on student levels of critical consciousness. Consistency in the development of critically conscious social work curriculum can better prepare students to address transgenerational social inequities.

Social work

Social sciences education

Critical Consciousness, Cultural Competency, Cultural Humility, Feminism, Feminist Theory, Social Action

Social Work

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Social Work. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: The Catholic University of America (Degree granting institution), Koh, Eun (Thesis advisor), Shields, Joseph (Committee member), Donaldson, Linda (Committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Critical Consciousness; Cultural Competency; Cultural Humility; Feminism; Feminist Theory; Social Action

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, K. (2020). Social Identity Memberships & Critical Consciousness: A Study of Foundation Year MSW Students. (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Kynai. “Social Identity Memberships & Critical Consciousness: A Study of Foundation Year MSW Students.” 2020. Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Kynai. “Social Identity Memberships & Critical Consciousness: A Study of Foundation Year MSW Students.” 2020. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson K. Social Identity Memberships & Critical Consciousness: A Study of Foundation Year MSW Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson K. Social Identity Memberships & Critical Consciousness: A Study of Foundation Year MSW Students. [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Murray, Teresa. The Role of Institutional Betrayal in Predicting Retention Intention Among Active Duty Service Members Who Have Experienced Sexual Assault.

Degree: Defense estimates indicate that approximately 13,000 female and 7,500 male service members experienced sexual assault in 2018, 2020, The Catholic University of America

Social work

Psychology

Military studies

institutional betrayal, military rape, military retention, military sexual assault, military sexual trauma, military turnover

Social Work

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Social Work. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: The Catholic University of America (Degree granting institution), Dombo, Eileen (Thesis advisor), Koh, Eun (Committee member), Shields, Joseph (Committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: institutional betrayal; military rape; military retention; military sexual assault; military sexual trauma; military turnover

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Murray, T. (2020). The Role of Institutional Betrayal in Predicting Retention Intention Among Active Duty Service Members Who Have Experienced Sexual Assault. (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214694

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murray, Teresa. “The Role of Institutional Betrayal in Predicting Retention Intention Among Active Duty Service Members Who Have Experienced Sexual Assault.” 2020. Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214694.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murray, Teresa. “The Role of Institutional Betrayal in Predicting Retention Intention Among Active Duty Service Members Who Have Experienced Sexual Assault.” 2020. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Murray T. The Role of Institutional Betrayal in Predicting Retention Intention Among Active Duty Service Members Who Have Experienced Sexual Assault. [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214694.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Murray T. The Role of Institutional Betrayal in Predicting Retention Intention Among Active Duty Service Members Who Have Experienced Sexual Assault. [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:214694

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.