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You searched for +publisher:"The Catholic University of America" +contributor:("Chung, Byung Min"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Fallatah, Arwa. Identifying the Mechanism and Impact of hnRNP K Regulation by K19.

Degree: 2021, The Catholic University of America

Keratins have been widely utilized as diagnostic and prognostic markers in cancer. One keratin with a strong link to cancer is keratin 19 (K19), which is overexpressed in several cancer types including breast cancer. Higher levels of K19 significantly correlate with worse overall survival of breast cancer patients. However, mechanisms of how K19 promotes breast cancer are not well understood. A previous study done in skin cancer showed that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) binds to a keratin similar to K19, leading to tumor cell growth and invasion. hnRNP K is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that can impact all steps of gene expression and are expressed in all tissue types. In various cancers, overexpression or cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP K promotes cell proliferation and metastasis. Based on the clinical evidence, we hypothesized that K19 promotes cell proliferation by interacting with hnRNP K which would then induce expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. To examine potential interaction between K19 and hnRNP K in breast cancer, we generated knockout (KO) or K19 in MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Our data shows that KRT19 KO cells exhibit reduced proliferation compared to parental control cells. We also found that hnRNP K interacts with K19, and we saw decreased levels of hnRNP K in the cytoplasm of KRT19 KO cells. To identify transcripts dependent on K19 and hnRNP K for expression, we performed RNA-seq experiments and also performed Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Crosslinking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) to identify RNAs bound to hnRNP K. By integrating PAR-CLIP and RNA-seq data, we found that K19 stabilizes hnRNP K targets, and this regulation is mainly through 3’UTR and introns of target genes. Pathways that were significantly dependent on K19 among hnRNP K targets included p53 pathway, and decreased level of p53 was confirmed in KRT19 KO cells. With this study, we identified how a cytoskeletal protein affects the transcriptomic landscape of breast cancer cells through its interaction with an RNA-binding protein. In the future, we can use the knowledge gained to develop an effective strategy to combat cancer.

Biology

Biology

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Biology. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: The Catholic University of America (Degree granting institution), Chung, Byung Min (Thesis advisor), Tuma, Pamela (Committee member), Hafner, Markus (Committee member).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fallatah, A. (2021). Identifying the Mechanism and Impact of hnRNP K Regulation by K19. (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:223937

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fallatah, Arwa. “Identifying the Mechanism and Impact of hnRNP K Regulation by K19.” 2021. Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:223937.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fallatah, Arwa. “Identifying the Mechanism and Impact of hnRNP K Regulation by K19.” 2021. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Fallatah A. Identifying the Mechanism and Impact of hnRNP K Regulation by K19. [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2021. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:223937.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fallatah A. Identifying the Mechanism and Impact of hnRNP K Regulation by K19. [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2021. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:223937

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Barrows, Brittani. Evaluation of the Protective Role of ADCC Mediating Antibodies in Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV-1.

Degree: 2020, The Catholic University of America

During pregnancy, the fetus acquires maternal antibodies by Fc receptor transfer across the placenta. Many of these Fc receptors are also expressed on immune cells and are responsible for recognition, activation and killing of HIV-1 infected cells as demonstrated in antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This study evaluated HIV+ maternal and respective HIV+ or HIV- infant plasma antibodies to understand potential factors that contribute to protection from HIV vertical transmission. Plasma antibodies were assessed for the functional capacity of mediating ADCC against heterologous and autologous HIV-1 infected target cells. While no differences in ADCC mediation were found between transmitting and nontransmitting mothers, HIV- infants had antibodies with greater ADCC potency and breadth. Both HIV+ and HIV- infants had natural killer cells with cytotoxic maturation markers, indicating necessary cellular maturity to implement ADCC. However, no differences were found in cytotoxic frequency. Maternal and infant antibody binding features were distinct in maternal transmission and infant infection status. Nontransmitting mothers and their HIV- infants had greater HIV-1 antigen-specific antibodies that engaged common placental transport and immune cell activation receptors. Nontransmitting mothers transferred higher HIV-specific antibodies that engaged the neonatal transport receptor (FcRn). HIV-1 recognizing antibodies that engage placental FcRn were found to be the greatest predictive feature of reduced MTCT. This study supports that HIV- infants acquire antibodies with greater recognition of HIV-1 antigen and mediation of ADCC.

Immunology

Virology

ADCC, HIV-1, MTCT, Placental Transport

Biology

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Biology. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: The Catholic University of America (Degree granting institution), Rao, Venigalla (Thesis advisor), Wieczorek, Lindsay (Committee member), Tovanabutra, Sodsai (Committee member), Chung, Byung Min (Committee member), Choy, John (Committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: ADCC; HIV-1; MTCT; Placental Transport

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barrows, B. (2020). Evaluation of the Protective Role of ADCC Mediating Antibodies in Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV-1. (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:213975

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barrows, Brittani. “Evaluation of the Protective Role of ADCC Mediating Antibodies in Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV-1.” 2020. Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:213975.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barrows, Brittani. “Evaluation of the Protective Role of ADCC Mediating Antibodies in Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV-1.” 2020. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Barrows B. Evaluation of the Protective Role of ADCC Mediating Antibodies in Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV-1. [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:213975.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barrows B. Evaluation of the Protective Role of ADCC Mediating Antibodies in Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV-1. [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:213975

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.