Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

You searched for +publisher:"The Catholic University of America" +contributor:("Charles B. Jones"). One record found.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Beldio, Patrick Michael. "Art and Beauty, Opposition and Growth in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram".

Degree: The Catholic University of America

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Religion and Culture. The Catholic University of America

Sri Aurobindo (nee Aurobindo Ghose, 1872-1950), a native of India, spent his youth studying poetry and the classics in England. Upon his return to colonial India, he became influential in Indian revolutionary politics. Inspired by his own spiritual experience, S'aktism, Vedanta, Tantra, and the Bhagavad Ghita, he later developed his own "integral yoga" in the French colonial city of Pondicherry. Instead of transcending the Earth, his yoga seeks to transform matter into what he calls "the new supramental creation." He wrote over 30 books in the areas of yoga theory and practice, social, political, and cultural reflection, art and poetry. He wrote his most important work, his epic poem Savitri, over a 35-year period as a way to develop his spiritual practice. Mirra Alfassa (1878-1973) shared Sri Aurobindo's goals and joined him in 1920. She was a gifted painter and musician and a spiritual seeker from Paris whom he named "the Mother" when they established the Sri Aurobindo Ashram in 1926. He considered her the feminine ?akti to his masculine ?vara role, and their followers believe them to be their Avat'ras (God/dess in human form). After he died, the Mother continued to guide the Ashram until her death. For 52 years she used painting to grow in her spiritual practice. Both gurus encouraged many of their disciples to use the arts for spiritual growth. Sri Aurobindo's work has inspired various prominent thinkers, and is considered a significant contribution to Hindu studies, as well as 20th-century colonial Indian history. He is regarded as one of the pioneers of the modern yoga renaissance; however, since the 1980s there has been a lack of scholarship on his thought, and particularly as this applies to art and religion. Also, the Mother's participation has never been critically examined in this tradition. This dissertation investigates the following question: What are the Mother's and Sri Aurobindo's aesthetic theory and to what extent does their artwork and their collaboration with their disciples demonstrate their aesthetics? This study uses a historical-critical methodology to examine the development of thought in their written texts on culture and aesthetics, and a visual culture approach to interpret their use of art, architecture, and visual culture. It relies upon disciples's diaries, reproductions of drawings and paintings by the Mother and her disciples, and the author's ethnographic data collected during his stay in the Ashram in India in 2012-13. The results of this dissertation: 1) their yoga is "descendant," demanding a principle of growth that welcomes oppositions found in life to stimulate the universalization of the basic consciousness and to divinize the Earth; the arts aid this process by helping the disciple to face oppositions with sincerity and resilience, and to unveil spiritual potentials that were not known until the creative process uncovered them; 2) they prize the intuition and higher spiritual faculties of…

Advisors/Committee Members: Michael Stoeber (Advisor), Charles B. Jones (Advisor), William Barbieri (Other), Kurt Martens (Other), Frederick Ahearn (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Religion; Fine arts; Cultural anthropology; David Morgan; Indian Aesthetics; Lindsay Jones; Religion and Art; The Mother and Sri Aurobindo; Visual Culture of Religion

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beldio, P. M. (n.d.). "Art and Beauty, Opposition and Growth in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram". (Thesis). The Catholic University of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:40842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beldio, Patrick Michael. “"Art and Beauty, Opposition and Growth in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram".” Thesis, The Catholic University of America. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:40842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beldio, Patrick Michael. “"Art and Beauty, Opposition and Growth in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram".” Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Beldio PM. "Art and Beauty, Opposition and Growth in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram". [Internet] [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:40842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Beldio PM. "Art and Beauty, Opposition and Growth in the Sri Aurobindo Ashram". [Thesis]. The Catholic University of America; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:40842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.