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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Woman\'s University" +contributor:("Petterborg, Larry"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. -2351-9089. The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age.

Degree: PhD, Nutrition, 2017, Texas Woman's University

The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the efficacy of iodine supplementation vs. placebo, in reproductive-age women, 18-45 years, in improving iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in a six-month, randomized-double-blinded-placebo-controlled trial. Non-pregnant (euthyroid, normal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), mean=1.57mIU/mL) women were randomized into two groups: 12.5mg Iodoral® (IG, n=65) or placebo (PG, n=38). Assessments included iodine status determination (24-hr urine iodine (UI), %-iodine saturation (% IS), sodium-iodide-symporter-ratio (NIS), saliva and serum iodide concentrations), thyroid function (serum TSH, free-thyroxine (T4), and free-tri-iodothyronine (T3) concentrations), body composition analysis using Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA), resting metabolic rate (RMR) testing, and analysis of 3-day dietary records, health, demographic, and physical activity questionnaires. Analysis of the data revealed dietary iodine intake to be significantly below standard recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of 150 µg iodine/d for IG and PG at baseline and six months. For the first time, associations were observed between dietary iodine intake and body composition, with decreased dietary iodine intake being associated with higher body fat content (p<0.01). Iodine status indicators, 24-hr UI and % IS were also significantly below normal, indicating iodine deficiency in the study population. Although 24-hr UI and % IS for IG and PG showed an increased trend from baseline to six months, statistical significance was not observed for between and within group effects, indicating that a longer duration of supplementation may be needed to improve iodine status in deficient populations. Saliva iodide increased significantly in IG (p=0.041), and PG (p=0.013) at the end of six months; however, NIS ratio remained unchanged, indicating normal functioning of the NIS. Free-T4 increased significantly at six months in IG and PG (p<0.001), however other thyroid function parameters remained unchanged, indicating that the high dose iodine supplement may be better tolerated than expected. RMR significantly increased in IG and PG (p<0.001) at six months, and was positively correlated (p<0.01) with all body composition variables. Overall, participants demonstrated a generalized lack of awareness of iodine nutrition and the implications of iodine deficiency in reproductive-age women, indicating a significant public health concern that needs to be addressed. Advisors/Committee Members: DiMarco, Nancy M (advisor), Petterborg, Larry (committee member), Warren, Cynthia (committee member), Maziarz, Mindy (committee member), Basiliadis, Margaret (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Iodine; Iodine status; Iodine supplementation study; Thyroid function; Public health; Clinical trials; Reproductive-age women in U.S.

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APA (6th Edition):

-2351-9089. (2017). The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236

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Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-2351-9089. “The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Woman's University. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-2351-9089. “The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age.” 2017. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-2351-9089. The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-2351-9089. The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

2. Firra, Joan C. Effects of treatment of urinary incontinence in women: Exercise or electrical stimulation or both.

Degree: PhD, Physical Therapy, 2008, Texas Woman's University

The effectiveness of electrical stimulation for treatment of urge incontinence versus stress incontinence is still uncertain because of research design flaws. The purposes of this study were to determine (a) whether exercise with electrical stimulation was an effective treatment for women with incontinence, and (b) whether treatment effectiveness varied between women with urge incontinence, versus women with stress incontinence. Sixty three women were assigned to either stress incontinence (n = 41) or urge incontinence (n = 22) for the study, 34 completing in the stress group and 13 in the urge group, (n = 47). Participants were randomized into 3 treatment groups, exercise with electrical stimulation, exercise alone, and no treatment. Forty women were Caucasian, 1 was African-American, aged 23 and 78, with Body Mass Index (BMI) between 17.7 and 50 and had at least 3 leaks in a 3 day period. Variables included manual muscle testing, pelvic floor strength in centimeters water pressure, contraction time, participants' self-reported incontinence leaks over 3 days, frequency of urination over 3 days, and quality of life as measured by the York Incontinence Perception Scale (YIPS). Participants completed an IRB permission form, the Medical, Epidemiological, and Social Aspects of Aging (MESA) questionnaire to determine type of incontinence, stress or urge, and the YIPS on the 1st visit and received an educational session and were randomized on the 2 nd visit. Those randomized into the treatment groups received treatment consisting of 15 sessions of treatment on a 2x a week basis. Participants who were randomized as “controls” and returned in 8 weeks for re-measurement of the same variables as on the first two visits and were then offered treatment. The 2 treatment groups were also remeasured at the end of 16 sessions. The 2 treatment groups performed 3 trunk muscle exercises and 3 pelvic floor muscle exercises, and performed them independently on a daily basis. Those in the exercise with electrical stimulation group additionally received 30 minutes of electrical stimulation with the Liberty stimulator at 12.5 Hz on each visit. Two dependent variables were eliminated as the manual muscle test correlated with perineometer scores and the endurance factor for seconds held for pelvic floor contraction was capped at 10. Leaks were eliminated at pre-treatment for lack of homogeneity. Therefore, further analysis for the remaining 3 variables was within and between treatment groups for only the stress incontinence group (n = 34). Significance for pelvic floor strength (P = .002) and the YIPS scores ( P = .001) was demonstrated for stress incontinence in both exercise with electrical stimulation and exercise alone groups. No changes were noted in the control group in either the pelvic floor strength (P = .505) or YIPS (P = 1.00). The decrease in visits to the bathroom (frequency) was not significant for the whole group, but 14 of 17 with frequency, experienced improvement. Analysis of the urge incontinence either within or between… Advisors/Committee Members: Thompson, Mary (Committee Chair), Petterborg, Larry (committee member), Smith, Susan (committee member), Jackson, Elaine (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Health and environmental sciences; Electrical stimulation; Exercise; Urinary incontinence; Women

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Firra, J. C. (2008). Effects of treatment of urinary incontinence in women: Exercise or electrical stimulation or both. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/11049

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Firra, Joan C. “Effects of treatment of urinary incontinence in women: Exercise or electrical stimulation or both.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Woman's University. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/11049.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Firra, Joan C. “Effects of treatment of urinary incontinence in women: Exercise or electrical stimulation or both.” 2008. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Firra JC. Effects of treatment of urinary incontinence in women: Exercise or electrical stimulation or both. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/11049.

Council of Science Editors:

Firra JC. Effects of treatment of urinary incontinence in women: Exercise or electrical stimulation or both. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/11049

.