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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Woman\'s University" +contributor:("DiMarco, Nancy M"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. -2351-9089. The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age.

Degree: PhD, Nutrition, 2017, Texas Woman's University

The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the efficacy of iodine supplementation vs. placebo, in reproductive-age women, 18-45 years, in improving iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in a six-month, randomized-double-blinded-placebo-controlled trial. Non-pregnant (euthyroid, normal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), mean=1.57mIU/mL) women were randomized into two groups: 12.5mg Iodoral® (IG, n=65) or placebo (PG, n=38). Assessments included iodine status determination (24-hr urine iodine (UI), %-iodine saturation (% IS), sodium-iodide-symporter-ratio (NIS), saliva and serum iodide concentrations), thyroid function (serum TSH, free-thyroxine (T4), and free-tri-iodothyronine (T3) concentrations), body composition analysis using Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA), resting metabolic rate (RMR) testing, and analysis of 3-day dietary records, health, demographic, and physical activity questionnaires. Analysis of the data revealed dietary iodine intake to be significantly below standard recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of 150 µg iodine/d for IG and PG at baseline and six months. For the first time, associations were observed between dietary iodine intake and body composition, with decreased dietary iodine intake being associated with higher body fat content (p<0.01). Iodine status indicators, 24-hr UI and % IS were also significantly below normal, indicating iodine deficiency in the study population. Although 24-hr UI and % IS for IG and PG showed an increased trend from baseline to six months, statistical significance was not observed for between and within group effects, indicating that a longer duration of supplementation may be needed to improve iodine status in deficient populations. Saliva iodide increased significantly in IG (p=0.041), and PG (p=0.013) at the end of six months; however, NIS ratio remained unchanged, indicating normal functioning of the NIS. Free-T4 increased significantly at six months in IG and PG (p<0.001), however other thyroid function parameters remained unchanged, indicating that the high dose iodine supplement may be better tolerated than expected. RMR significantly increased in IG and PG (p<0.001) at six months, and was positively correlated (p<0.01) with all body composition variables. Overall, participants demonstrated a generalized lack of awareness of iodine nutrition and the implications of iodine deficiency in reproductive-age women, indicating a significant public health concern that needs to be addressed. Advisors/Committee Members: DiMarco, Nancy M (advisor), Petterborg, Larry (committee member), Warren, Cynthia (committee member), Maziarz, Mindy (committee member), Basiliadis, Margaret (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Iodine; Iodine status; Iodine supplementation study; Thyroid function; Public health; Clinical trials; Reproductive-age women in U.S.

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APA (6th Edition):

-2351-9089. (2017). The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236

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Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-2351-9089. “The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Woman's University. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236.

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Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-2351-9089. “The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age.” 2017. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

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Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-2351-9089. The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-2351-9089. The effect of iodine supplementation on biomarkers of iodine status, thyroid function, resting metabolic rate, and body composition in women, 18-45 years of age. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10236

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

2. Joy, Jordan M. Comparative effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, ketogenic diet on body composition and athletic performance in recreationally-active males and females.

Degree: PhD, Nutrition, 2018, Texas Woman's University

Athletes often manipulate dietary carbohydrates, and one dietary approach is a low-carbohydrate, high-fat, ketogenic diet (KD). Therefore, the purpose of the present investigation was to compare effects of a KD and a control diet (CD) on body composition and athletic performance in trained males and females. In a parallel-arm, longitudinal, diet- and exercise-controlled design, 39 participants (23 ± 4.4 years; 75.8 ± 15.5 kg; 169.4 ± 8.3 cm) exercised for 9 weeks while consuming either a KD or a CD. Diets were matched for energy intake. Non-protein macronutrients for the KD (percent energy as carbohydrate:fat:protein, 5:72:23) differed from the CD (53:24:23). Pre- and post-testing were conducted during the weeks prior to and following the intervention. A 5-component (5C) model of body composition was calculated using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA)-determined bone mineral content (BMC) and fat mass (FM), bioelectric impedance spectroscopy (BIS)-determined intra- (ICF) and extracellular fluid (ECF), and scale weight data. Tests of athletic performance included vertical jump (VJ), 1-repetition maximum (1RM) in the back squat and bench press, repeated Wingate sprints, and a 5 km time trial (5k) run. A significant group by time effect for body weight (p = 0.031) was observed for KD (-1.1 ± 1.9 kg) versus CD (+0.3 ± 1.9 kg), and this was associated with a trend (p = 0.075) for greater loss of FM (KD: -3.2 ± 2.8; CD: -1.9 ± 1.6 kg), which was lost with the 5C model (p = 0.260). KD reduced (p = 0.017) ECF compared to CD (KD: -0.3 ± 0.6; CD: +0.3 ± 0.9 L), yet increases in lean soft tissue (LST) were identical between groups (+2.1 ± 1.5 kg). KD tended to reduce (p = 0.054) peak power (PP) output during the first Wingate sprint (KD: -28.1 ± 85.9; CD: +25.1 ± 79.7 W). Recovery of PP between the first and final set was significantly greater (p = 0.042) in KD (+155.9 ± 147.4 W) than CD (+70.0 ± 98.6 W). The present data suggest that overall exercise adaptations are not compromised following 9 weeks of a KD. A KD reduces body weight, predominately as FM. Advisors/Committee Members: DiMarco, Nancy M. (advisor), Rigby, Brandon R. (committee member), Du, Xiaofen (committee member), Broughton, Kenneth (committee member), Wildman, Robert (committee member), Moon, Jordan R. (committee member), Serrano, Eric (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: strength; diet; nutrition; sports nutrition; low-carb; endurance; ketones; bhb; targetted ketogenic diet; cyclic ketogenic diet; carbohydrate restriction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Joy, J. M. (2018). Comparative effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, ketogenic diet on body composition and athletic performance in recreationally-active males and females. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10163

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Joy, Jordan M. “Comparative effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, ketogenic diet on body composition and athletic performance in recreationally-active males and females.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Woman's University. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10163.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Joy, Jordan M. “Comparative effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, ketogenic diet on body composition and athletic performance in recreationally-active males and females.” 2018. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Joy JM. Comparative effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, ketogenic diet on body composition and athletic performance in recreationally-active males and females. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10163.

Council of Science Editors:

Joy JM. Comparative effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, ketogenic diet on body composition and athletic performance in recreationally-active males and females. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Woman's University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10163

3. Kiertscher, Elizabeth. Use and rationale for taking nutritional supplements among collegiate athletes at risk for nutrient deficiencies.

Degree: MS, Nutrition, 2010, Texas Woman's University

This study examined aspects of collegiate athletes' eating habits, weight, and nutritional supplement use. The purpose of this study was to determine if athletes who were at risk for nutritional deficiencies use nutritional supplements and if their concerns about positive drug tests discouraged their use of nutritional supplements. One hundred and thirty four athletes answered a questionnaire developed by the researcher for this study through Psychdata. In this study 49 athletes were considered at risk for nutrient deficiencies. More athletes (53%) at risk for nutrient deficiencies took nutritional supplements than those not at risk (33%). Among those at risk, more athletes (69%) who were not concerned about nutritional supplements causing a positive drug test took supplements than those who were concerned (38%). Athletes need to be educated about reliable sources of information, dosing, and safety of supplements. Athletes also need to be informed of the consequences of taking unsafe supplements. Advisors/Committee Members: DiMarco, Nancy M. (Committee Chair), Rew, Martha L. (committee member), Nichols, David (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Nutrition; Kinesiology; Health and environmental sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kiertscher, E. (2010). Use and rationale for taking nutritional supplements among collegiate athletes at risk for nutrient deficiencies. (Masters Thesis). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10088

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kiertscher, Elizabeth. “Use and rationale for taking nutritional supplements among collegiate athletes at risk for nutrient deficiencies.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Texas Woman's University. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10088.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kiertscher, Elizabeth. “Use and rationale for taking nutritional supplements among collegiate athletes at risk for nutrient deficiencies.” 2010. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kiertscher E. Use and rationale for taking nutritional supplements among collegiate athletes at risk for nutrient deficiencies. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas Woman's University; 2010. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10088.

Council of Science Editors:

Kiertscher E. Use and rationale for taking nutritional supplements among collegiate athletes at risk for nutrient deficiencies. [Masters Thesis]. Texas Woman's University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/10088

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