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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Tech University" +contributor:("Littlefield, Andrew K."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas Tech University

1. -3869-6897. Internalizing symptoms and health behaviors associated with relational peer victimization: An examination of perceived social support and hope in relation to youth adjustment.

Degree: PhD, Psychology - Clinical, 2018, Texas Tech University

Approximately 28% of youth ranging in age from 12-18 years have reported experiencing peer victimization (PV) at school. Negative consequences of PV include social and emotional maladjustment and increased internalizing and externalizing problems. Although many studies have examined the relations between PV and mental health outcomes, few have assessed the relation between PV experiences and youth’s health behaviors. Additionally, research has not yet clearly identified risk and protective factors related to PV. Participants completed assessments of relational PV, perceived social support from close friends, hope, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms. In addition, participants were asked to wear ActiGraph accelerometers for 72 hours to assess participants’ levels of sleep and physical activity. Participants’ nutrition was assessed using daily food diaries. It was hypothesized that the likelihood of having elevated levels of internalizing symptoms increases as a function of being relationally victimized. It was also hypothesized that the likelihood of youths’ below average positive health behaviors increases as a function of being relationally victimized. Additionally, perceived social support from close friends was hypothesized to moderate the above-mentioned relations. Finally, it was hypothesized that hope would mediate the relations between PV and internalizing symptoms, and engagement in positive health behaviors. Participants consisted of 197 children and adolescents from two collection sites. The results indicated that relational PV was associated with greater odds of having elevated general anxiety symptoms; however, the significant main effect did not remain after adjusting for comorbid depressive symptoms. Relational PV was associated with greater odds of having elevated depressive symptoms, which remained after adjusting for youths’ general anxiety symptoms. Contrary to hypotheses, associations between relational PV and health behaviors were not significant. Similarly, perceived social support from close friends was not a significant moderator across all analyses. Regarding indirect effects, relational PV had a significant indirect effect on youths’ depressive symptoms, through hope. Contrary to hypotheses, relational PV did not have a significant indirect effect on youths’ general anxiety symptoms or positive health behaviors, through hope. These results help fill gaps in the current literature pertaining to the constructs of social support and hope, and how these constructs relate to relational peer victimization, youth’s internalizing symptoms, and youth’s health behaviors. Advisors/Committee Members: Colwell, Malinda (committee member), Cukrowicz, Kelly C. (committee member), Littlefield, Andrew K. (committee member), Van Allen, Jason (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Child and Adolescent; Peer Victimization; Internalizing Symptoms; Health Behaviors

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APA (6th Edition):

-3869-6897. (2018). Internalizing symptoms and health behaviors associated with relational peer victimization: An examination of perceived social support and hope in relation to youth adjustment. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74367

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Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-3869-6897. “Internalizing symptoms and health behaviors associated with relational peer victimization: An examination of perceived social support and hope in relation to youth adjustment.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Tech University. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74367.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-3869-6897. “Internalizing symptoms and health behaviors associated with relational peer victimization: An examination of perceived social support and hope in relation to youth adjustment.” 2018. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

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Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-3869-6897. Internalizing symptoms and health behaviors associated with relational peer victimization: An examination of perceived social support and hope in relation to youth adjustment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74367.

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Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-3869-6897. Internalizing symptoms and health behaviors associated with relational peer victimization: An examination of perceived social support and hope in relation to youth adjustment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74367

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


Texas Tech University

2. Haslam, Aaron. Mood and affect during a smoking cessation attempt in those with cancer: An ecological momentary assessment study.

Degree: PhD, Psychology - Clinical, 2018, Texas Tech University

Smoking has been shown to be a causal factor in the development of many cancer types. Continued smoking after a diagnosis of cancer leads to a greater risk of cancer recurrence, development of second primary cancers, cancer-specific mortality, and overall mortality. Despite the benefits of quitting, many people will continue to smoke following a diagnosis of cancer. Unfortunately, little is known about the quit process in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation is to examine the correlates of smoking and smoking-related variables during the initial part of the quit attempt. Participants (N = 44) were recruited from the Tobacco Treatment Program at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. They were followed for the first three weeks of their quit attempt using ecological momentary assessment. Results indicated that the experience of stressors was likely related to increases in smoking urges, negative affect, and likely the number of smoking episodes following the report of stressors. Furthermore, it appeared that within-person increases of anhedonic symptoms were related to a reduction in the number of smoking episodes following the report of these symptoms. Results also suggest that those who were unable to achieve abstinence at five weeks typically had higher negative affect, dysphoric symptoms as well as lower anhedonic and somatic symptoms of depression. Based on these results, stressors and depressive symptoms may be important correlates of smoking behaviors in this population. Furthermore, the results indicate that some effects may be different among the cancer population compared to the general population of smokers. Advisors/Committee Members: Blalock, Janice (committee member), Van Allen, Jason (committee member), Richards, Steven (committee member), Cohen, Lee M. (committee member), Littlefield, Andrew K. (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Smoking cessation; cancer population

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haslam, A. (2018). Mood and affect during a smoking cessation attempt in those with cancer: An ecological momentary assessment study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74368

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haslam, Aaron. “Mood and affect during a smoking cessation attempt in those with cancer: An ecological momentary assessment study.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Tech University. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74368.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haslam, Aaron. “Mood and affect during a smoking cessation attempt in those with cancer: An ecological momentary assessment study.” 2018. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Haslam A. Mood and affect during a smoking cessation attempt in those with cancer: An ecological momentary assessment study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74368.

Council of Science Editors:

Haslam A. Mood and affect during a smoking cessation attempt in those with cancer: An ecological momentary assessment study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74368


Texas Tech University

3. -3729-7368. Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates.

Degree: PhD, Psychology - Clinical, 2017, Texas Tech University

Suicide is a significant concern among psychiatric inpatients. The interpersonal theory of suicide may provide a theoretical lens through which to conceptualize suicide ideation within this group. This theory posits that thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are risk factors for suicide ideation. The theory also suggests that thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are related, yet distinct constructs. That is, although perceived burdensomeness requires one to have relationships on which to feel a burden, these relationships may not always fulfill the need to belong; thus, thwarted belongingness may still be experienced. Given this, it would be expected that as one experiences greater perceived social support, he or she would report less thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Individuals who engage with criminal associates (i.e., individuals one knows who participate in crime) may experience poor relationship quality, which may increase psychological distress. Therefore, the association between perceived social support, thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and distress due to suicide ideation may be stronger among those with greater involvement with criminal associates. It was hypothesized that perceived social support would be negatively associated with thwarted belongingness (H1) and perceived burdensomeness (H2), and these associations would be magnified among those with greater involvement with criminal associates. Additionally, it was hypothesized that thwarted belongingness (H3) and perceived burdensomeness (H4) would be positively associated with distress due to suicide ideation, and these associations would be magnified among those with greater involvement with criminal associates. Participants were 142 psychiatric inpatients who completed assessments of perceived social support, perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, involvement with criminal associates, and distress due to suicide ideation. Ordinary least squares regression, ordinal logistic regression, and multinomial logistic regression were used to test the hypotheses. The results indicated perceived social support was significantly negatively associated with thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Additionally, thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness were significantly associated with greater odds of experiencing distress due to suicide ideation. Contrary to the hypotheses, these associations did not vary based on involvement with criminal associates. The models were also tested when adjusting for depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Implications and limitations are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Alquist, Jessica L. (committee member), Littlefield, Andrew K. (committee member), Morgan, Robert D. (committee member), Cukrowicz, Kelly C. (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: suicide ideation; criminal associates; social support; thwarted belongingness; perceived burdensomeness; psychiatric inpatients

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-3729-7368. (2017). Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-3729-7368. “Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Tech University. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-3729-7368. “Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates.” 2017. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-3729-7368. Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-3729-7368. Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

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