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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Tech University" +contributor:("Kolyesnikova, Nataliya P."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Barber, Nelson A. How self-confidence and knowledge effects the sources of information selected during purchase situations.

Degree: Hospitality Administration, 2008, Texas Tech University

The wine market is changing at such a fast pace, wine producers need to competitively market their products and services to consumers. However, consumers bring to the buying decision different types of experiences and expectations. Therefore, it is necessary to target consumers, understand their behavioral characteristics, purchase decisions, and their purchasing needs. Factors affecting how customers make decisions are extremely complex and not all decisions are treated the same. Some decisions are more complex, while others are fairly routine. Information search and self-confidence have emerged as critical and central components of consumer decision making models with situational determinants considered an important attribute to consider. This study investigated the mediating role self-confidence plays with knowledge in the selection of sources of information given different wine purchase situations. The research design was a self administered on-line survey distributed to 1,200 individuals. Based upon multivariate analysis and structural equation modeling, this research found past experience to be the most influential predictor of a consumer’s wine knowledge, particularly their level of subjective knowledge. This research also found consumers with high levels of subjective knowledge likely to have high levels of self-confidence, confirming the mediating effect of self-confidence and suggesting consumer’s are likely to use themselves as a source of information, rather than other sources. Results suggest that subjective knowledge may have other measurable and meaningful components, such as self-efficacy, that play an important part in the consumers’ ability to make a purchase decision. Advisors/Committee Members: Dodd, Timothy H. (Committee Chair), Blum, Shane C. (Committee Chair), Kolyesnikova, Nataliya P. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Wine; Knowledge; Consumer decision; Self-confidence

Texas Tech University, Nelson Barber, May 2008 ABSTRACT The wine market is changing at… …consumer decision, wine, knowledge vii Texas Tech University, Nelson Barber, May 2008 LIST OF… …Difference Test ….........................106 viii Texas Tech University, Nelson Barber, May… …103 ix Texas Tech University, Nelson Barber, May 2008 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION In many… …x29;, and direct 2 Texas Tech University, Nelson Barber, May 2008 experience (self… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barber, N. A. (2008). How self-confidence and knowledge effects the sources of information selected during purchase situations. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/14511

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barber, Nelson A. “How self-confidence and knowledge effects the sources of information selected during purchase situations.” 2008. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/14511.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barber, Nelson A. “How self-confidence and knowledge effects the sources of information selected during purchase situations.” 2008. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Barber NA. How self-confidence and knowledge effects the sources of information selected during purchase situations. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2008. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/14511.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barber NA. How self-confidence and knowledge effects the sources of information selected during purchase situations. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/14511

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Burusnukul, Pattarapong. EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS.

Degree: Nutrition, Hospitality, and Retailing, 2011, Texas Tech University

Annually billions of consumers worldwide experience foodborne illnesses attributed to sub-standard hygienic practices. A contributing issue often cited is inadequate and improper handwashing by foodservice workers. Handwashing compliance in the foodservice industry has been reported to be sub-optimal and in critical need of improvement. In order to achieve successful behavioral change, a range of personal, social, and environmental factors as well as barriers to performing food safety practices in retail foodservice establishments need to be addressed. Research shows relying on educational training alone is ineffective and likely to produce limited results. Therefore, a comprehensive intervention program that incorporates an educational component and addresses the ecological factors influential to the performance of handwashing behavior in the organizational infrastructure is needed to ensure optimal results. In-depth understanding of the relationships among factors influencing handwashing intention, handwashing behavior, and knowledge about handwashing performance would be useful to foodservice providers for the development and implementation of effective handwashing intervention programs. The purpose of this research was two-fold: (a) to develop a theoretical framework for the investigation of handwashing behavior in the foodservice context and (b) to validate the foodservice handwashing theoretical framework in a cross-cultural context. A research-based model incorporating the psychology-based Theory of Planned Behavior (TpB) was proposed to explain the relationships among ecological variables and to better understand the motivational factors underlying foodservice workers’ handwashing performance in two cultures, the United States (US) and Taiwan, Republic of China (ROC). Data were collected in the Fall of 2009 in the US and in the Fall of 2010 in Taiwan, ROC from a convenience sample comprised of undergraduate university students majoring in Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts programs who had foodservice work experience. For each cultural context, data were analyzed to assess the validity and reliability of the self-administered handwashing survey instrument and to evaluate the utility of the hypothesized TpB based model in examining handwashing behavior in foodservice settings. Further, data analysis was performed to examine the relationships among the multi-item variables including: (a) handwashing behavior, (b) intention, (c) attitude, (d) subjective norm, (e) perceived behavioral control, (f) subjective knowledge, (g) behavioral beliefs, (h) normative beliefs, and (i) control beliefs. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis indicated the handwashing assessment instrument (FS/HB-76) was successfully developed, having validity and reliability in measuring the constructs of the extended TpB to examine handwashing behavior in the foodservice context. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses showed acceptable model fit to the observed data from self-administered surveys suggesting the… Advisors/Committee Members: Harp, Shelley S. (Committee Chair), Stout, Betty L. (committee member), Kolyesnikova, Nataliya P. (committee member), Callison, Coy (committee member), Binkley, Margaret (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Theory of planned behavior; Foodborne illness; Food safety; Food service; Handwashing

Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011 Subjective knowledge construct… …vii 123 123 126 127 127 127 Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011… …168 viii Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011 V. PREDICTING… …Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011 ABSTRACT Annually billions of… …and handwashing intention and behavior. xii Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burusnukul, P. (2011). EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burusnukul, Pattarapong. “EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS.” 2011. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burusnukul, Pattarapong. “EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS.” 2011. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Burusnukul P. EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Burusnukul P. EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas Tech University

3. Taylor, David C. Wine education courses: Changes in wine preferences and motivations for attending.

Degree: Hospitality Administration, 2008, Texas Tech University

Like art, wine can be an aesthetic product that requires knowledge before it can be fully understood. To dispel this confusion and to develop knowledge about wine, wine education courses are conducted across the globe. This dissertation is the first study to look at what motivates consumers to take wine education courses. Additionally, this dissertation explores what effects wine education courses have on consumer preferences and their knowledge about wine. For the first study, 131 past and current participants in a wine appreciation course were surveyed to understand what motivated them to attend the course. The findings were different than what has been found in other studies for what motivated people to take other continuing education courses and were different than the motivations to go to a wine festivals. The main motivation for the participants was that they were motivated to become better wine consumers. For the second study, a quasi-experimental design was utilized. Participants were given a test and questionnaire about wine at the beginning of the course which gauged both their subjective knowledge, or what they think they know, and objective knowledge, what they actually knew. They were also asked to blind taste wines and rank those wines. At the end of the course, they repeated both the questionnaire and the blind tasting. The results showed that objective knowledge actually increased, but participants subjective knowledge did not. So, they may have known more but they did not think that they did. Further, though it was anticipated that preferences would change for wine styles following the wine course, they did not. Rankings of wines actually did, though, decrease between pre and post-course. Wine appears to continue to be a confusing topic to consumers, even after they attend a wine course. Though participants seemed to have become more discriminating tasters, as evidenced by the lower rankings of the wines in the post-test, they still did not believe that they were any more knowledgeable about wine, so other methods need to be developed which build subjective knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Dodd, Timothy H. (Committee Chair), Kolyesnikova, Nataliya P. (committee member), Yuan, Jingxue (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Wine tasting

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, D. C. (2008). Wine education courses: Changes in wine preferences and motivations for attending. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, David C. “Wine education courses: Changes in wine preferences and motivations for attending.” 2008. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, David C. “Wine education courses: Changes in wine preferences and motivations for attending.” 2008. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Taylor DC. Wine education courses: Changes in wine preferences and motivations for attending. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2008. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor DC. Wine education courses: Changes in wine preferences and motivations for attending. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.