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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Tech University" +contributor:("Griffin, Kent"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas Tech University

1. Ferkel, Rick. Relations among Physical Fitness Knowledge, Physical Fitness, and Physical Activity.

Degree: Education, 2011, Texas Tech University

The purpose of this study is to examine the relations among health-related fitness knowledge (HRFK), physical fitness (PF), and physical activity (PA) in a college-aged adult population. This issue is particularly important because of the growing concerns over declining health and weight control and the pressing need to comprehend the underlying mechanisms that will lead to greater levels of fitness and adherence to exercise. Participants included 191 (79 females, 112 males) college students (non-Hispanic White; 70.2 %) with ages ranging from 18-25 years (M = 20.3). Participants’ HRFK (independent variable) was tested using the FitSmart Test (Zhu et al., 1999). Dependent variables for this study included: a) a PF composite score of seven different testing variables including muscular strength and endurance, cardiorespiratory endurance, and body composition, b) self-report PA as measured by the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and c) triaxial accelerometery. Results from this study point to a number of important findings. First, college students’ HRFK was very low with well over half of the participants having a score of 70% or lower. Second, analysis of data using sequential regressions indicated there was a significant relationship between HRFK and Fitness, Δ R2 = .018, p = .037; and HRFK and Fitness without body composition (FNBC), Δ R2 = .031, p = .009. Third, a sequential regression including HRFK and years of high school sports (HSS) indicated HSS was the strongest indicator of PF, Δ R2 = .110, p < .001; FNBC, Δ R2 = .169, p < .001,; and self-report PA, Δ R2 = .033, p = .024 while HRFK contributed to the regression model. Overall, results indicate that HRFK is associated with PF levels in college-aged students though to a limited degree. This modest finding, however, points to the critical nature of HRFK even among the youngest and most active group of adults whose past experience with organized sports dominates their rationale for future physical activity. It seems likely that HRFK would be even more important as adults advance in age. Future researchers, therefore, should continue to examine links between fitness and knowledge among adults in diverse stages of the life span. Advisors/Committee Members: Hamman, Douglas (Committee Chair), Stodden, David (committee member), Griffin, Kent (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Health-related fitness knowledge; Fitness knowledge; Physical fitness; Physical activity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ferkel, R. (2011). Relations among Physical Fitness Knowledge, Physical Fitness, and Physical Activity. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1614

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ferkel, Rick. “Relations among Physical Fitness Knowledge, Physical Fitness, and Physical Activity.” 2011. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed August 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1614.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ferkel, Rick. “Relations among Physical Fitness Knowledge, Physical Fitness, and Physical Activity.” 2011. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Ferkel R. Relations among Physical Fitness Knowledge, Physical Fitness, and Physical Activity. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1614.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ferkel R. Relations among Physical Fitness Knowledge, Physical Fitness, and Physical Activity. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1614

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas Tech University

2. Gilinsky, Nicole J. Physical activity and self-regulatory capabilites: Examining relationships with academic self-efficacy and academic outcomes.

Degree: Educational Psychology, 2010, Texas Tech University

Knapp, Kelly-Reid and Ginder (2010) reported that only 57.2% of students enrolled in four-year postsecondary institutions had graduated within six years of beginning their studies during the period of 2002-2008. Other studies have reported similar trends for college graduation rates, which have remained stable over the past decade (NCES, 2001). Kim, Newton, Downey, & Benton (2010) explain that students’ success in college is commonly defined as progress toward a degree, acceptable academic achievement, and attainment of necessary life skills. In order to reach these goals, students require high levels of independence and self-regulation (Bryde & Milburn, 1990). These regulatory behaviors are found to be related to enhanced self-efficacy as well as other positive self-beliefs (Cleary & Zimmerman, 2004). Several studies have shown that participation in physical exercise programs can improve regulatory behaviors in diverse domains of functioning such as study habits, health behaviors, punctuality, and impulse spending (Oaten & Cheng, 2006). The physiological and psychological benefits of physical exercise have been well-documented (Craft, 2005; Craft & Landers, 1998; Etnier, et al., 1997; Pedersen & Saltin, 2006). However, Lowry et al. (2000) found that fewer than 40% of college students are maintaining adequate amounts of physical activity for health benefits. Furthermore, compelling evidence exists for a positive relationship between physical activity and favorable academic outcomes; such as higher achievement test scores, fewer school absences, and fewer behavioral problems (Datar & Sturm, 2006; Grissom, 2005). The current study examined the relationships between physical activity engagement, academic self-regulatory behaviors, and academic achievement for college ix students. Findings from this study showed that students who engage in more frequent moderate and/or high intensity physical activity exhibited a higher degree of academic self-efficacy than students who engage in less physical activity. Results also showed that academic self-efficacy was associated with academic self-regulatory capabilities. The findings also suggest that students who engage in more physical activity attain more favorable academic outcomes than less physically active students. These findings add to our understanding of the physiological and cognitive benefits of physical activity and its impact on students‟ functioning from a social cognitive perspective. Advisors/Committee Members: Burley, Hansel E. (Committee Chair), Siwatu, Kamau O. (committee member), Hamman, Douglas (committee member), Griffin, Kent (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Self-efficacy; Positive psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gilinsky, N. J. (2010). Physical activity and self-regulatory capabilites: Examining relationships with academic self-efficacy and academic outcomes. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45213

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gilinsky, Nicole J. “Physical activity and self-regulatory capabilites: Examining relationships with academic self-efficacy and academic outcomes.” 2010. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed August 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45213.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gilinsky, Nicole J. “Physical activity and self-regulatory capabilites: Examining relationships with academic self-efficacy and academic outcomes.” 2010. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Gilinsky NJ. Physical activity and self-regulatory capabilites: Examining relationships with academic self-efficacy and academic outcomes. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2010. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45213.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gilinsky NJ. Physical activity and self-regulatory capabilites: Examining relationships with academic self-efficacy and academic outcomes. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/45213

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.