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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Tech University" +contributor:("Davis, Kim"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Walker, Jodi K. Local implementation of the AcieveTexas college and career initiative as reported by Texas high school counselors.

Degree: 2013, Texas Tech University

The purpose of the study was to understand the high school counselor’s perception of the integration of the AchieveTexas College and Career Initiative at the local level, determine how much time high school counselors spent on the four components of the Texas Comprehensive Developmental Guidance program (including AchieveTexas), and identify the perceptions of success and barriers within the implementation process. In the summer of 2012, perceptions of high school counselors of the local implementation of AchieveTexas in Regions 13 and 20 in Texas on their campuses were examined using an online survey. These regions were targeted because their districts had offered and/or received professional development for counselors regarding the local implementation of AchieveTexas. High school counselors reported that successful outcomes for implementation of AchieveTexas included increased enrollment in Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses (67.9%), increased number of applications for admission to postsecondary institutions (64.2%), and increased graduation rates (62.3%). Barriers to implementation of the AchieveTexas initiative included lack of time and/or information and counselor to student ratios. Overall, the successful implementation of AchieveTexas requires “buy-in” of principals, counselors, teachers, parents, and the surrounding community. Findings of the study suggest that the AchieveTexas initiative is a tool to guide local districts to implement career clusters on their local campus and help students acquire college and career readiness skills that will benefit them in their future. AchieveTexas requires collaboration at various levels to achieve this goal. Advisors/Committee Members: Alexander, Karen L. (Committee Chair), Couch, Sue (committee member), Stout, Betty L. (committee member), Davis, Kim (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: AchieveTexas; Career clusters

Texas Tech University, Jodi Walker, May 2013 ABSTRACT The purpose of the study was to… …achieve this goal. vii Texas Tech University, Jodi Walker, May 2013 LIST OF TABLES 2.1… …53 viii Texas Tech University, Jodi Walker, December 2012 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The… …www.gatesfoundation.org, 2012). 1 Texas Tech University, Jodi Walker, May 2013 Additionally, according… …Technology  Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security 2 Texas Tech University, Jodi Walker… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Walker, J. K. (2013). Local implementation of the AcieveTexas college and career initiative as reported by Texas high school counselors. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/50632

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walker, Jodi K. “Local implementation of the AcieveTexas college and career initiative as reported by Texas high school counselors.” 2013. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/50632.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walker, Jodi K. “Local implementation of the AcieveTexas college and career initiative as reported by Texas high school counselors.” 2013. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Walker JK. Local implementation of the AcieveTexas college and career initiative as reported by Texas high school counselors. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2013. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/50632.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Walker JK. Local implementation of the AcieveTexas college and career initiative as reported by Texas high school counselors. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/50632

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas Tech University

2. Harness, Nathaniel J. Three essays on the capital accumulation ratio.

Degree: Applied and Professional Studies, 2007, Texas Tech University

It is crucial for the financial planning profession to develop measures and standards to help households make the best financial decisions. According to Black, Ciccotello, & Skipper (2002), for financial planning to be accepted as a profession there needs to be sound empirically based standards recognized by household finance scholars and practitioners. Households make financial decision everyday that potentially affect their financial well-being. Researchers must provide prescriptive models to combat household inequalities, and these models must not ignore basic household limitations for the sake of turgid mathematical modeling. Many consider the capital accumulation ratio (CAR) to be one of the most important ratios for those approaching retirement. However, little research in the field of personal financial planning has comprehensively explored the usefulness of this household ratio. The CAR is traditionally defined as the proportion of net worth held in investment assets and is meant to reflect the share of assets held primarily for future consumption. Results from this research will provide better quality information about the implications of the CAR to household finance scholars, financial planning professionals, and households. This research studies the factors that predict the CAR, the impact of the CAR on wealth, and the effect of variance in the CAR on wealth. This research uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY79), a nationally representative panel data set comprised of youth who were between the ages of 14 and 21 on December 31st, 1979. The NLSY79 has surveyed the same households between 1979 and 2004 comprising of 21 waves of this panel, with a 90 percent retention rate in subsequent years. Factors associated with CAR do not appear stable across time. From year to year very few factors consistently predict CAR or meeting CAR guidelines. Prior literature has looked at a cross-section in time; this cannot account for household variation in preferences and macroeconomic shocks that have an immense impact on CAR. Findings reveal that those who have a higher income, greater education, white households, and those with white-collar jobs are positively associated with CAR in most years. Having children, owning a home, minority households, and those with low preferences for stocks are negatively associated with CAR. Meeting the CAR 25 percent guideline resulted in a 28.1 percent increase in the change of net worth from 1994 to 2004. When broken into quartiles the relationship between CAR and wealth was linear between quartile three and four. However, this increase comes at a cost when every one point increase in the CAR increased the standard deviation of net worth from 1994 to 2004 by 8.1 percent. Results from this study suggest that meeting the 25 percent CAR threshold leads to greater wealth over time at the tradeoff of higher wealth dispersion. Individual investor preferences lead to poor market timing choices that can negatively impact wealth over time. … Advisors/Committee Members: Finke, Michael S. (Committee Chair), Hampton, Vickie L. (Committee Chair), Masselli, John J. (committee member), Salter, John (committee member), Davis, Kim (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Capital accumulation; Financial planning; Finance ratios

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harness, N. J. (2007). Three essays on the capital accumulation ratio. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/10191

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harness, Nathaniel J. “Three essays on the capital accumulation ratio.” 2007. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/10191.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harness, Nathaniel J. “Three essays on the capital accumulation ratio.” 2007. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Harness NJ. Three essays on the capital accumulation ratio. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2007. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/10191.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harness NJ. Three essays on the capital accumulation ratio. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/10191

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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