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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Tech University" +contributor:("Binkley, Margaret"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas Tech University

1. Rowell, Andrea E. Evaluation of food safety knowledge and practices employed in maintaining and operating hot/cold self-serve bars in food retailing.

Degree: Animal and Food Sciences, 2011, Texas Tech University

Increasing availability of foods offered by grocery stores in hot/cold self-serve bars has created new food safety training challenges. The purpose of this research was to determine the impact of manager food safety training on employee knowledge and performance related hot/cold self-serve bars. Three retail chains participated having 15 stores per chain observed by the investigators pre- and post-training at set-up, lunch, and closing to collect information on food safety practices. After pre-training observation, managers from 8 stores per chain attended an eight-hour food safety training course (training group), while managers from the remaining 7 stores received no additional training (control group). Managers from the training group were encouraged to train their employees with the knowledge they had gained. Following the training all stores were observed to collect post-training data. The observational scores for the control and trained stores pre-training and post-training were compared. Manager training had no significant (P ≤ 0.05) affect on employee food safety behaviors pre- or post-training based on investigator observations. Prior to training there was a strong relationship (r = 0.680) between the managers’ and employees’ knowledge. After training this relationship decreased (r = 0.356), indicating that no new information was transferred post-training. Since no new information was gained the employee and manager knowledge was combined to reflect the stores’ knowledge. The store knowledge only moderately impacted the stores’ pre- training performance in the observational category of temperature control (r = 0.327), but that impact was not altered by manager training. It was determined that audit categories of personnel (0.358 ), food handling (0.316), storage (0.384), and observation category food temperature (0.350) were moderately related to how much the manager knew on performance-based questions. The information gained by the post-training performance and knowledge scores was used to determine the food safety training needs. The performance scores indicated that training materials covering practices related to food temperature, utensil usage, and product handling need to be developed. The knowledge scores indicated that materials related to proper cleaning and sanitizing, and general food safety principles (such as time and temperature control, good personal hygiene, and cross contamination prevention) should also be developed. Advisors/Committee Members: Thompson, Leslie D. (Committee Chair), Alvarado, Christine Z. (committee member), Burris, Scott (committee member), Binkley, Margaret (committee member), Brashears, Mindy M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Food safety training; Hot/cold self-serve bars

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rowell, A. E. (2011). Evaluation of food safety knowledge and practices employed in maintaining and operating hot/cold self-serve bars in food retailing. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1616

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rowell, Andrea E. “Evaluation of food safety knowledge and practices employed in maintaining and operating hot/cold self-serve bars in food retailing.” 2011. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed December 02, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1616.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rowell, Andrea E. “Evaluation of food safety knowledge and practices employed in maintaining and operating hot/cold self-serve bars in food retailing.” 2011. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Rowell AE. Evaluation of food safety knowledge and practices employed in maintaining and operating hot/cold self-serve bars in food retailing. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1616.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rowell AE. Evaluation of food safety knowledge and practices employed in maintaining and operating hot/cold self-serve bars in food retailing. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-08-1616

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Burusnukul, Pattarapong. EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS.

Degree: Nutrition, Hospitality, and Retailing, 2011, Texas Tech University

Annually billions of consumers worldwide experience foodborne illnesses attributed to sub-standard hygienic practices. A contributing issue often cited is inadequate and improper handwashing by foodservice workers. Handwashing compliance in the foodservice industry has been reported to be sub-optimal and in critical need of improvement. In order to achieve successful behavioral change, a range of personal, social, and environmental factors as well as barriers to performing food safety practices in retail foodservice establishments need to be addressed. Research shows relying on educational training alone is ineffective and likely to produce limited results. Therefore, a comprehensive intervention program that incorporates an educational component and addresses the ecological factors influential to the performance of handwashing behavior in the organizational infrastructure is needed to ensure optimal results. In-depth understanding of the relationships among factors influencing handwashing intention, handwashing behavior, and knowledge about handwashing performance would be useful to foodservice providers for the development and implementation of effective handwashing intervention programs. The purpose of this research was two-fold: (a) to develop a theoretical framework for the investigation of handwashing behavior in the foodservice context and (b) to validate the foodservice handwashing theoretical framework in a cross-cultural context. A research-based model incorporating the psychology-based Theory of Planned Behavior (TpB) was proposed to explain the relationships among ecological variables and to better understand the motivational factors underlying foodservice workers’ handwashing performance in two cultures, the United States (US) and Taiwan, Republic of China (ROC). Data were collected in the Fall of 2009 in the US and in the Fall of 2010 in Taiwan, ROC from a convenience sample comprised of undergraduate university students majoring in Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts programs who had foodservice work experience. For each cultural context, data were analyzed to assess the validity and reliability of the self-administered handwashing survey instrument and to evaluate the utility of the hypothesized TpB based model in examining handwashing behavior in foodservice settings. Further, data analysis was performed to examine the relationships among the multi-item variables including: (a) handwashing behavior, (b) intention, (c) attitude, (d) subjective norm, (e) perceived behavioral control, (f) subjective knowledge, (g) behavioral beliefs, (h) normative beliefs, and (i) control beliefs. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis indicated the handwashing assessment instrument (FS/HB-76) was successfully developed, having validity and reliability in measuring the constructs of the extended TpB to examine handwashing behavior in the foodservice context. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses showed acceptable model fit to the observed data from self-administered surveys suggesting the… Advisors/Committee Members: Harp, Shelley S. (Committee Chair), Stout, Betty L. (committee member), Kolyesnikova, Nataliya P. (committee member), Callison, Coy (committee member), Binkley, Margaret (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Theory of planned behavior; Foodborne illness; Food safety; Food service; Handwashing

Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011 Subjective knowledge construct… …vii 123 123 126 127 127 127 Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011… …168 viii Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011 V. PREDICTING… …Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul, May 2011 ABSTRACT Annually billions of… …and handwashing intention and behavior. xii Texas Tech University, Pattarapong Burusnukul… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burusnukul, P. (2011). EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burusnukul, Pattarapong. “EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS.” 2011. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed December 02, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burusnukul, Pattarapong. “EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS.” 2011. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Burusnukul P. EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Burusnukul P. EXTENDING THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR: FACTORS PREDICTING INTENTIONS TO PERFORM HANDWASHING PROTOCOL IN CROSS-CULTURAL FOODSERVICE SETTINGS. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/ETD-TTU-2011-05-1347

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.