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You searched for +publisher:"Texas State University – San Marcos" +contributor:("Roundtree, Aimee K."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Ramos, Stephen D. "This Illness Ain't Gonna Kill Me"  – A Qualitative Insight to Various Behavioral and Biopsychosocial Factors of Stress for Adults Living with HIV.

Degree: MA, Psychological Research, 2016, Texas State University – San Marcos

Research on HIV and stress is not uncommon in academic literature. However, little research has been done through a qualitative psychological perspective that aims to identify specific realms of stress people living with HIV (PLH) experience. Furthermore, there is no developed psychosocial measurement of stress specific to living with HIV that can be used in either clinical settings or research settings. This study uses Grounded Theory qualitative methodology and semi-structured interviews to assess and conceptually develop stress in PLH. Participants (n=20) were 12 PLH and 8 individuals who work primarily with clients who are living with HIV. Participants participated in semi-structured interviews where interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed for data analysis. Identified themes included Housing Strains, Engagement in Substance Use, Limited Financial Abilities, Relationship Dynamics, Internal Pressures, and Psychosocial Resiliency. Results from this study suggest that unsatisfactory housing situations, such as location, lack of choice, and intrusive environment, can foster growth of stress. Engagement in substance use can be seen as both a previously utilized and familiar method of coping with stressors as well as a rational behavior that does not cognitively register as coping with stress. Limited financial means can create a constraint cycle where the individual is unable to fund basic necessities and is thus unable to be employed; this cycle can lead to a situation of strained financial resources. Because of this cycle, necessities are often placed on a hierarchy of demand and neglect. With regard to relationships, HIV can both build and sever bonds with others, depending on how disclosure is received. Lastly, data showed an overall positive regard towards life and towards the future as HIV+ individuals progress in life. These accounts can be utilized in creating a greater understanding of stress for PLH and in developing a more comprehensive and cohesive care for PLH and experiencing stress. Advisors/Committee Members: Schepis, Ty S. (advisor), Roundtree, Aimee K. (committee member), Haskard-Zolnierek, Kelly (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: HIV; Substance use; Stress; AIDS (Disease) – Psychological aspects

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramos, S. D. (2016). "This Illness Ain't Gonna Kill Me"  – A Qualitative Insight to Various Behavioral and Biopsychosocial Factors of Stress for Adults Living with HIV. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6320

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramos, Stephen D. “"This Illness Ain't Gonna Kill Me"  – A Qualitative Insight to Various Behavioral and Biopsychosocial Factors of Stress for Adults Living with HIV.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6320.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramos, Stephen D. “"This Illness Ain't Gonna Kill Me"  – A Qualitative Insight to Various Behavioral and Biopsychosocial Factors of Stress for Adults Living with HIV.” 2016. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Ramos SD. "This Illness Ain't Gonna Kill Me"  – A Qualitative Insight to Various Behavioral and Biopsychosocial Factors of Stress for Adults Living with HIV. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6320.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramos SD. "This Illness Ain't Gonna Kill Me"  – A Qualitative Insight to Various Behavioral and Biopsychosocial Factors of Stress for Adults Living with HIV. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2016. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6320


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Koller, Adrienne M. Surviving the "Yellow Door" - An Analysis of Post-Treatment Psychosocial Resilience.

Degree: MA, Psychological Research, 2015, Texas State University – San Marcos

Although research has been conducted on residential treatment centers, there has been little research that explores how this experience impacted former students in terms of their psychosocial and life skills functioning post-treatment. Moreover, research has failed to include the student’s interpretation of their experience and perceptions in outcome findings. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and Framework Method, interview questionnaires of 41 former Sonia Shankman Orthogenic School students were subjected to qualitative analysis in order to identify common themes across participants. Identified themes included psychosocial functioning deficits, reduced life skills functioning, and long-term emotional sequelae. Results from the present study suggest that participants disassociated the positive achievements attained in life, such as academic achievements, healthy relationships, successful careers, and positive self-esteem, from their experience and treatment received at the Orthogenic School. They also identified long-term effects, such as significant emotional scarring, need for increased mental health treatment, reduced functioning skills, and inability to form healthy or intimate relationships that they attributed to their experience and treatment at the Orthogenic School. These descriptive accounts can be utilized to improve and update therapeutic policy within residential treatment centers, minimizing ineffective treatment or negative long-term effects. Advisors/Committee Members: Graham, Reiko (advisor), Roundtree, Aimee K. (committee member), Seay, Ollie (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sonia Shankman Orthogenic School; Bettelheim, Bruno; Treatment Outcomes; Emotionally Disturbed Children in Residential Treatment; Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis; Child Behavior; Adverse Childhood Experiences; Attachment Theory; Social Bonds/Control Theory; Differential Association Theory; Modeling Theory; Sonia Shankman Orthogenic School – Case studies; Adolescent psychotherapy – Residential treatment; Problem youth – Institutional care; Mentally ill – Rehabilitation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koller, A. M. (2015). Surviving the "Yellow Door" - An Analysis of Post-Treatment Psychosocial Resilience. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5496

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koller, Adrienne M. “Surviving the "Yellow Door" - An Analysis of Post-Treatment Psychosocial Resilience.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5496.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koller, Adrienne M. “Surviving the "Yellow Door" - An Analysis of Post-Treatment Psychosocial Resilience.” 2015. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Koller AM. Surviving the "Yellow Door" - An Analysis of Post-Treatment Psychosocial Resilience. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5496.

Council of Science Editors:

Koller AM. Surviving the "Yellow Door" - An Analysis of Post-Treatment Psychosocial Resilience. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5496

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