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You searched for +publisher:"Texas State University – San Marcos" +contributor:("Novoa, Clara M."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Sun, Fei. Operation of Net-Zero Carbon Charging Stations with Renewable Energy Integration.

Degree: MSin Technology, Industrial Technology, 2015, Texas State University – San Marcos

The goal of this project is to develop a quantitative approach for designing and operating charging stations using intermittent renewable energy. In particular wind turbines (WT) and solar photovoltaic panels (PV) are integrated into charging stations in order to displace fossil fuel based energy and reduce carbon emissions. This study performs a feasibility analysis of implementing a cost-effective and environmentally- benign charge station for electric vehicles. The grid-connected distributed generation system consists of WT, solar PV, battery storage packs and a net metering system. The capacity of WT, solar PV panels, and the battery system are decision variables which will be optimized. Due to the intermittency of wind and solar generation, the output power of WT and PV is not guaranteed. Quantitative decision models are formulated and allow for simulating the output of wind and solar generation hour-by-hour during the course of a year. The optimal size or capacity of WT, PV and battery is determined to minimize the annualized charge station cost. Ten candidate cities where charging station will be constructed are chosen from different areas of world, representing the variation and diversity of wind speed and weather conditions. Even if the cost parameters in the optimization model are identical, the optimal decision on the capacity of WT, PV and battery could be different due to the diversity of climatic profiles. Our numerical results show that charging stations can attain net-zero carbon emission with onsite renewable energy resources in regions where medium wind speed or sunny weather prevails. Advisors/Committee Members: Jin, Tongdan (advisor), Novoa, Clara M. (committee member), Jimenez, Jesus (committee member), Sriraman, Vedaraman (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Onsite generation; Decision variable; Charging station; Cost-effective

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sun, F. (2015). Operation of Net-Zero Carbon Charging Stations with Renewable Energy Integration. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6387

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Fei. “Operation of Net-Zero Carbon Charging Stations with Renewable Energy Integration.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6387.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Fei. “Operation of Net-Zero Carbon Charging Stations with Renewable Energy Integration.” 2015. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Sun F. Operation of Net-Zero Carbon Charging Stations with Renewable Energy Integration. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6387.

Council of Science Editors:

Sun F. Operation of Net-Zero Carbon Charging Stations with Renewable Energy Integration. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6387


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Vejandla, Durga Tejaswani. Optimizing the Automated Plasma Cutting Process by Design of Experiment.

Degree: MS, Industrial Technology, 2009, Texas State University – San Marcos

Building complex two–dimensional metallic parts is difficult due to the physical properties of the metal, such as its solid nature, thickness, etc. Automated Plasma Cutting is an effective process for building complex parts in a short period of time. It cuts the metallic parts up to one inch thick with any given complexity, and with no usage of physical man power. Since, there are several possible machine settings (i.e., current, pressure, cutting speed, torch height, etc.), parts cut by using the plasma cutting process often lack good quality. Sometimes, these parts are not completely cut because the plasma gas does not penetrate all the way through the sheet metal due to insufficient pressure or excessive torch height, pressure, cutting speed or current. This research was conducted to discover the optimum machine settings by implementing a Design of Experiments approach (DOE) to find those relevant factors that affect the part’s surface quality characteristics (i.e., surface roughness, flatness, accumulation underneath the work piece, bevel angles, and dimensional accuracy of the metal work piece). These important characteristics of part quality were considered as response variables. In this research, a response surface methodology approach and Desirability functions were used to optimize the automated plasma cutting settings. Final results identified an optimal machine configuration that facilitates the fabrication of parts with close-to-perfect quality for all 18 quality measurement responses. Advisors/Committee Members: Asiabanpour, Bahram (advisor), Novoa, Clara M. (committee member), Hager, Cassandrea Jane (committee member), Jimenez, Jesus A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Optimization; Plasma cutting; Design of Experiment; Desirability function; Response surface method; Optimal parameter setting; Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vejandla, D. T. (2009). Optimizing the Automated Plasma Cutting Process by Design of Experiment. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3158

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vejandla, Durga Tejaswani. “Optimizing the Automated Plasma Cutting Process by Design of Experiment.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3158.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vejandla, Durga Tejaswani. “Optimizing the Automated Plasma Cutting Process by Design of Experiment.” 2009. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Vejandla DT. Optimizing the Automated Plasma Cutting Process by Design of Experiment. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3158.

Council of Science Editors:

Vejandla DT. Optimizing the Automated Plasma Cutting Process by Design of Experiment. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2009. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3158

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