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You searched for +publisher:"Texas State University – San Marcos" +contributor:("Meitzen, Kimberly M."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Cavin, Rachel M. Beaver Dam Dimensions and Distribution in Northeastern New Mexico.

Degree: MS, Geography, 2015, Texas State University – San Marcos

The impacts of beaver dams on the geomorphology and ecology of the landscapes on which they are built have grown to become a significant body of literature in recent decades. Additionally, the landscape characteristics most suitable for beaver and dam construction have been modeled, revealing factors important for quality beaver habitat and beaver dam establishment. Beaver dam dimensions, structure, and attributes have not been emphasized in these studies, and little is known about how the landscape influences beaver dam morphology and distribution. The purpose of this study was to examine how beaver dams differ in dimension, structure, and distribution between two New Mexico state parks, then to assess the landscape characteristics spatially associated with these differences. Results indicate that narrow valley widths inhibit beaver dam establishment. High values in stream gradient and sinuosity also appear to inhibit beaver dam establishment. Narrow valley widths, high stream gradients, high sinuosity, and larger upstream catchment areas appear to be most relevant to the incidence of gap flow beaver dams. In particular, beaver dams downstream of narrow valley widths appear to be most vulnerable to breaches. Multithread channels, wider valleys, and low-moderate stream gradients appear advantageous for the establishment of beaver dams. It was difficult to determine patterns related to vegetation and beaver dam establishment, because beavers modify vegetation communities by selective foraging and cutting. Advisors/Committee Members: Butler, David R. (advisor), Dixon, Richard W. (committee member), Meitzen, Kimberly M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Beaver Dam; Biogeomorphology; Biogeography; GIS; New Mexico

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cavin, R. M. (2015). Beaver Dam Dimensions and Distribution in Northeastern New Mexico. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6391

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cavin, Rachel M. “Beaver Dam Dimensions and Distribution in Northeastern New Mexico.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6391.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cavin, Rachel M. “Beaver Dam Dimensions and Distribution in Northeastern New Mexico.” 2015. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Cavin RM. Beaver Dam Dimensions and Distribution in Northeastern New Mexico. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6391.

Council of Science Editors:

Cavin RM. Beaver Dam Dimensions and Distribution in Northeastern New Mexico. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6391


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Kamarinas, Ioannis. Geospatial Analyses of Terrestrial-Aquatic Connections Across New Zealand and their Influence on River Water Quality.

Degree: PhD, Geographic Information Science, 2018, Texas State University – San Marcos

This dissertation presents new techniques for quantifying and mapping terrestrial-aquatic connections, as well as new approaches for assessing the effects of intensive land uses on river water quality. Chapter 1 describes the general format of the dissertation as well as the research questions that were the impetus for this research. Chapter 2 is a case-study that investigated the nonlinear changes in land cover and sediment runoff in a sub-tropical catchment in New Zealand. Sediment budgets and their analyses showed that exotic forests were the dominant source of sediment runoff in periods of forest harvesting, while grasslands assumed the dominant role once exotic forests recovered. Connected land disturbance and water clarity time-series exhibited similar temporal break points, suggesting that the former can be a good indicator of stream water quality. Last, the connectivity layer that was developed could serve as a guide for placing and prioritizing Best Management Practices. In Chapter 3, a more accurate nationwide stream network for New Zealand was developed, that included intermittent and ephemeral streams, based on physiographic characteristics and varying thresholds. Results showed that the use of 8 different thresholds produced a higher and wider range of drainage density values. The new modeled network performed very well and identified the mapped validation headwaters 83-95% of the time. In Chapter 4, a new prioritization scheme for the protection of unmapped headwater channels in the most sediment-impaired catchment was proposed. Results showed more than 8,000 km of headwater streams need prioritization, with around 60% of them being High-priority. These streams corresponded to more than 34,000 channel heads with 55.6% of them being High-priority. Using a conservative 10-m buffer on these headwaters produced an area of 175.4 sq. km that would need to be buffered or excluded from livestock. Last, Chapter 5 discusses the future work and broader impacts of this dissertation. Advisors/Committee Members: Julian, Jason P. (advisor), Meitzen, Kimberly M. (committee member), Zhan, F. Benjamin (committee member), de Beurs, Kirsten M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Land use; Water quality; Landscape disturbance; Sediment runoff; Landscape connectivity; Stream network; Channel heads; Headwater prioritization; Cover change; Watershed management; Riparian ecology; Land use – Planning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kamarinas, I. (2018). Geospatial Analyses of Terrestrial-Aquatic Connections Across New Zealand and their Influence on River Water Quality. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7391

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kamarinas, Ioannis. “Geospatial Analyses of Terrestrial-Aquatic Connections Across New Zealand and their Influence on River Water Quality.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7391.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kamarinas, Ioannis. “Geospatial Analyses of Terrestrial-Aquatic Connections Across New Zealand and their Influence on River Water Quality.” 2018. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kamarinas I. Geospatial Analyses of Terrestrial-Aquatic Connections Across New Zealand and their Influence on River Water Quality. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7391.

Council of Science Editors:

Kamarinas I. Geospatial Analyses of Terrestrial-Aquatic Connections Across New Zealand and their Influence on River Water Quality. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7391


Texas State University – San Marcos

3. Dascher, Erin Dorothea. Dams, Dam Removals, and Freshwater Mussel Conservation.

Degree: PhD, Environmental Geography, 2017, Texas State University – San Marcos

This study uses variety of analytical and geospatial techniques to analyze the connections between fragmentation and freshwater mussel distribution and community composition in Texas and the Guadalupe San Antonio River System (GSARS). Additionally, dam removal is assessed and promoted as a strategy for freshwater mussel conservation. The distribution of dams is related to Texas’ climate gradient and the location of population centers. Models of connectivity reveal the increasing amount of fragmentation dams have created in the GSARS through time and the substantial number of undocumented sources of fragmentation in this river system. Patterns of freshwater mussel distribution and community composition are related to the distribution of host fish, climate gradients, hydrologic regimes, and land use. Two dam removal prioritization models are created for the GSARS that incorporate metrics associated with freshwater mussel conservation and individual dam attributes. These models act as broad scale decision support tools for freshwater mussel conservation that can be built upon and further refined with additional data sources. Advisors/Committee Members: Meitzen, Kimberly M. (advisor), Julian, Jason P. (committee member), Zhan, F. Benjamin (committee member), Schwalb, Astrid (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Fragmentation; Dams; River Connectivity; Freshwater Mussels; Dam Removal; Texas; Guadalupe-San Antonio River System; Mussels – Conservation – Texas – Guadalupe River Watershed; Mussels – Conservation – Texas – San Antonio River Watershed; Dam retirement – Texas

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dascher, E. D. (2017). Dams, Dam Removals, and Freshwater Mussel Conservation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6791

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dascher, Erin Dorothea. “Dams, Dam Removals, and Freshwater Mussel Conservation.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6791.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dascher, Erin Dorothea. “Dams, Dam Removals, and Freshwater Mussel Conservation.” 2017. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Dascher ED. Dams, Dam Removals, and Freshwater Mussel Conservation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6791.

Council of Science Editors:

Dascher ED. Dams, Dam Removals, and Freshwater Mussel Conservation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2017. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6791

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