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You searched for +publisher:"Texas State University – San Marcos" +contributor:("Kaufhold, William T."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Price, Debra Muller. The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States.

Degree: MA, Mass Communication, 2018, Texas State University – San Marcos

Driven in large part by the outsized role of undocumented immigration as an issue in the 2016 presidential election and beyond, and as a contemporary issue in state-level politics, this study was interested in identifying the relationship between political identity, media use, and the role of residency  – specifically, the role of border-state residency  – on attitudes about immigration. Two studies  – one using a substantial secondary data set from a national biennial survey and a second, original survey, found strong links between party identity, selective media exposure, and attitudes on immigration. Republicans are significantly likely to sort themselves by media platform and by specific media outlet, especially to conservative talk radio, cable television news, and online political blogs, and to avoid traditional objective sources like national newspapers and broadcast television news. Support for, or opposition to, immigration is largely predicted by party identification and media selection. Importantly, border-state residency was found to moderate the effect. Texans in the 2016 survey were significantly more empathetic to undocumented immigrants from Latin America than were Ohioans, and this effect held even within party identity and selective media use. But one year into the Trump presidency, public opinion had shifted. In the 2018 study, Texans were shown to report less tolerance for immigration, even on identical issues. A final finding reveals that the viewing of local news in newspapers and on television correlates with more oppositional views of immigration. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaufhold, William T. (advisor), Joyce, Vanessa H. (committee member), Ehmer, Emily (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Immigration; Selective Exposure; 2016 Presidential Election; Trump Presidency; Illegal aliens – United States – Public opinion; Mass media and immigrants – United States; Presidents – United States – Election – 2016

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Price, D. M. (2018). The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Price, Debra Muller. “The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 27, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Price, Debra Muller. “The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States.” 2018. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Price DM. The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374.

Council of Science Editors:

Price DM. The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Coker, Michael C. Transitioning Online: A Study of the Transgender Community's Digital Evolution and Self-Portrayal Practices in an Online Setting.

Degree: MA, Mass Communication, 2017, Texas State University – San Marcos

This 2-part study examined transgender individuals’ use of social media and used a variety of attitude measures to capture their perceived social support, self-acceptance, and attitudes about deception and trust in social media. A national survey of members of the transgender community (N=131) found that high social media users were less trusting and more accepting of deceptive behaviors online; those who live in the South report less social support than those living in any other region of the country; many were reluctant to report how they “negotiated” their gender transition on social media and half (51.4%) reported abandoning their original social media personas and creating new ones after transitioning. This study makes unique contributions to the understanding of the role of social media in the lives of transgender Americans. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaufhold, William T. (advisor), Joyce, Vanessa de Macedo Higgins (committee member), Farris, Kristen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Digital Media; Social Media; Transgender; Gender Identity; Self-Acceptance; Social Support; Transgender people; Sexual minorities in mass media; Sexual minorities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coker, M. C. (2017). Transitioning Online: A Study of the Transgender Community's Digital Evolution and Self-Portrayal Practices in an Online Setting. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6943

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coker, Michael C. “Transitioning Online: A Study of the Transgender Community's Digital Evolution and Self-Portrayal Practices in an Online Setting.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 27, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6943.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coker, Michael C. “Transitioning Online: A Study of the Transgender Community's Digital Evolution and Self-Portrayal Practices in an Online Setting.” 2017. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Coker MC. Transitioning Online: A Study of the Transgender Community's Digital Evolution and Self-Portrayal Practices in an Online Setting. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6943.

Council of Science Editors:

Coker MC. Transitioning Online: A Study of the Transgender Community's Digital Evolution and Self-Portrayal Practices in an Online Setting. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2017. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6943


Texas State University – San Marcos

3. Lee, Eun Jeong. Snapping Up Legacy Media: Using Theory of Affordances to Explain How News Outlets Behave on Snapchat.

Degree: MA, Mass Communication, 2018, Texas State University – San Marcos

Snapchat has become an important tool for media outlets to try to reach younger audience members who are active in the social media space but increasingly absent from traditional media platforms. The Snapchat Discover platform has enabled U.S. media outlets to engage directly with younger media consumers in an effort to develop new relationships. This study uses an affordances approach to explore how U.S. media outlets utilize Snapchat to reach young people, the audience least engaged with traditional media. Using content analysis and interviews, this study found that publishers on Discover adopt Snapchat’s affordances and adapt their story topic and presentation of content with an emphasis on the visual. Specifically, they appear to rely on vertical video, immediacy, ephemerality, and creativity to meet the characteristics of the platform and its users. Yet, differences emerge between traditional “legacy” and “new” media outlets, especially in news judgment. From a theoretical perspective, this research expands the literature on affordances and constraints of social media platforms used by U.S. media. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaufhold, William T. (advisor), Ngondo, Prisca S. (committee member), Carter, Daniel (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Snapchat; Theory of Affordances; News Outlets; Snapchat (Electronic resource); Communication – Technological innovations; Cognition; Perception

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, E. J. (2018). Snapping Up Legacy Media: Using Theory of Affordances to Explain How News Outlets Behave on Snapchat. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7468

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Eun Jeong. “Snapping Up Legacy Media: Using Theory of Affordances to Explain How News Outlets Behave on Snapchat.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 27, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7468.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Eun Jeong. “Snapping Up Legacy Media: Using Theory of Affordances to Explain How News Outlets Behave on Snapchat.” 2018. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lee EJ. Snapping Up Legacy Media: Using Theory of Affordances to Explain How News Outlets Behave on Snapchat. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7468.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee EJ. Snapping Up Legacy Media: Using Theory of Affordances to Explain How News Outlets Behave on Snapchat. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7468

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