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You searched for +publisher:"Texas State University – San Marcos" +contributor:("Ehmer, Emily"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Price, Debra Muller. The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States.

Degree: MA, Mass Communication, 2018, Texas State University – San Marcos

Driven in large part by the outsized role of undocumented immigration as an issue in the 2016 presidential election and beyond, and as a contemporary issue in state-level politics, this study was interested in identifying the relationship between political identity, media use, and the role of residency  – specifically, the role of border-state residency  – on attitudes about immigration. Two studies  – one using a substantial secondary data set from a national biennial survey and a second, original survey, found strong links between party identity, selective media exposure, and attitudes on immigration. Republicans are significantly likely to sort themselves by media platform and by specific media outlet, especially to conservative talk radio, cable television news, and online political blogs, and to avoid traditional objective sources like national newspapers and broadcast television news. Support for, or opposition to, immigration is largely predicted by party identification and media selection. Importantly, border-state residency was found to moderate the effect. Texans in the 2016 survey were significantly more empathetic to undocumented immigrants from Latin America than were Ohioans, and this effect held even within party identity and selective media use. But one year into the Trump presidency, public opinion had shifted. In the 2018 study, Texans were shown to report less tolerance for immigration, even on identical issues. A final finding reveals that the viewing of local news in newspapers and on television correlates with more oppositional views of immigration. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaufhold, William T. (advisor), Joyce, Vanessa H. (committee member), Ehmer, Emily (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Immigration; Selective Exposure; 2016 Presidential Election; Trump Presidency; Illegal aliens – United States – Public opinion; Mass media and immigrants – United States; Presidents – United States – Election – 2016

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Price, D. M. (2018). The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Price, Debra Muller. “The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Price, Debra Muller. “The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States.” 2018. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Price DM. The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374.

Council of Science Editors:

Price DM. The Border Effect: An Examination of News Use and Immigration Opinion in Border and Non-Border States. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7374


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Shepherd, Jene M. Don't Touch My Crown: Texturism as an Extension of Colorism in the Natural Hair Community.

Degree: MA, Mass Communication, 2018, Texas State University – San Marcos

No abstract prepared. Advisors/Committee Members: De Macedo Higgins Joyce, Vanessa (advisor), Craig, Clay (committee member), Ehmer, Emily (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Advertising; Natural hair movement; Colorism; Texturism; Hair texture; Black women; Black feminist thought; Hairdressing of African Americans; Feminism – African Americans

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shepherd, J. M. (2018). Don't Touch My Crown: Texturism as an Extension of Colorism in the Natural Hair Community. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7886

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shepherd, Jene M. “Don't Touch My Crown: Texturism as an Extension of Colorism in the Natural Hair Community.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7886.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shepherd, Jene M. “Don't Touch My Crown: Texturism as an Extension of Colorism in the Natural Hair Community.” 2018. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Shepherd JM. Don't Touch My Crown: Texturism as an Extension of Colorism in the Natural Hair Community. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7886.

Council of Science Editors:

Shepherd JM. Don't Touch My Crown: Texturism as an Extension of Colorism in the Natural Hair Community. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2018. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7886

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