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You searched for +publisher:"Texas State University – San Marcos" +contributor:("Dietrich, David"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Smith, Marianne. Group Identity, Ideology, and Mass Media: Content Analysis of the 2018 Media Spectacles Family Separation and Migrant Caravan.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2019, Texas State University – San Marcos

Media content analysis prompts an examination of the process through which meaning making and identity is reflected in and simultaneously shaped by a commercialized mass media industry. Immigration coverage in mass media especially drives ideological identity work as national identity ideology becomes a debate between two politically distinct sides. This content analysis examines print and cable news coverage of two media spectacles involving immigration in 2018: family separation at the border and migrant caravans. This thesis examines the themes that emerge across politically diverse news outlets and categorizes them in terms of how the phenomena is represented among distinct group identities utilizing Ethnographic Content Analysis methodology (Altheide 1987). Findings show that as media outlets are both bound by and champions for their political ideologies, convincing the audience to feel one way in contrast to another way becomes a battle between the political left and right. During the 2018 border media spectacles, evidence employed by the media in this battle consistently included these themes: 1) lamenting childhood trauma and condemning those who caused it, 2) fact checking the enemy and delivering reality to the audience, 3) framing in political terms, 4) assigning a guilty party for the Latino Immigrant Issue at hand, and 5) asking who is responsible to then step up and address the Latino Immigrant Issue and at what cost to Americans? Advisors/Committee Members: Pino, Nathan (advisor), Dietrich, David (committee member), Agwuele, Augustine (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Media; Group identity; Ideology; Immigration; Illegal aliens; Refugee families; Emigration and immigration; Mass media

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, M. (2019). Group Identity, Ideology, and Mass Media: Content Analysis of the 2018 Media Spectacles Family Separation and Migrant Caravan. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8975

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Marianne. “Group Identity, Ideology, and Mass Media: Content Analysis of the 2018 Media Spectacles Family Separation and Migrant Caravan.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8975.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Marianne. “Group Identity, Ideology, and Mass Media: Content Analysis of the 2018 Media Spectacles Family Separation and Migrant Caravan.” 2019. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith M. Group Identity, Ideology, and Mass Media: Content Analysis of the 2018 Media Spectacles Family Separation and Migrant Caravan. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8975.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith M. Group Identity, Ideology, and Mass Media: Content Analysis of the 2018 Media Spectacles Family Separation and Migrant Caravan. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2019. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8975


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Phillips, Rachel L. #MarchForOurLives: Mobilization of a Gun Violence Prevention Movement on Twitter.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2019, Texas State University – San Marcos

Social media has been a pivotal tool in the mobilization of social movements in the past century. Digital websites such as Twitter provide a public space for individuals to be informed about current issues and motivated to act based on their personal attitudes and opinions. Though social media activism is flawed, it is a useful tool for the progression and success of social movement behavior. This research focuses on the mobilization of the gun control movement March for Our Lives on Twitter. The present study uses an unobtrusive content analysis of tweets referencing the hashtagMarchForOurLives from February 18, 2018 through March 24, 2018 to examine how social media portrays social movement behavior in the wake of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The examination of public discourse on social media following a national tragedy can provide evidence of how social media affects social movement activity and protest behavior. After analyzing 888 tweets, I found that discourse on social media encourages protest activity through political extremism, fearmongering techniques, celebrity involvement, and online protest behavior. While social media fosters a public space for discourse, it also hinders notions of the collective conscience by emphasizing bipartisan disagreements on current issues such as gun violence. Advisors/Committee Members: Pino, Nathan W. (advisor), Dietrich, David R. (committee member), Carson, Jo Ann (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Twitter; Social movements; Gun violence; Mass shooting; Parkland; March For Our Lives; Protest; Social media; Public sphere; Collective conscience; Political Process Theory; Twitter; Social movements; Mass media – Social aspects; Gun control – United States

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Phillips, R. L. (2019). #MarchForOurLives: Mobilization of a Gun Violence Prevention Movement on Twitter. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8008

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Phillips, Rachel L. “#MarchForOurLives: Mobilization of a Gun Violence Prevention Movement on Twitter.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8008.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Phillips, Rachel L. “#MarchForOurLives: Mobilization of a Gun Violence Prevention Movement on Twitter.” 2019. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Phillips RL. #MarchForOurLives: Mobilization of a Gun Violence Prevention Movement on Twitter. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8008.

Council of Science Editors:

Phillips RL. #MarchForOurLives: Mobilization of a Gun Violence Prevention Movement on Twitter. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2019. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8008


Texas State University – San Marcos

3. Reyes, Dezerae D. Dress Code Policies, Race, Exclusion, and the Cultural Economy in Austin and San Marcos, Texas.

Degree: MS, Sociology, 2020, Texas State University – San Marcos

No abstract prepared. Advisors/Committee Members: Dietrich, David (advisor), Romero, Rachel (committee member), Goldstone, Dwonna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Dress Codes; Race; Night-time Economy; Austin, Texas; San Marcos, Texas; Nightlife – Economic aspects – Texas – San Marcos; Nightlife – Economic aspects – Texas – Austin; Nightclubs – Social aspects

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reyes, D. D. (2020). Dress Code Policies, Race, Exclusion, and the Cultural Economy in Austin and San Marcos, Texas. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12233

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reyes, Dezerae D. “Dress Code Policies, Race, Exclusion, and the Cultural Economy in Austin and San Marcos, Texas.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12233.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reyes, Dezerae D. “Dress Code Policies, Race, Exclusion, and the Cultural Economy in Austin and San Marcos, Texas.” 2020. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Reyes DD. Dress Code Policies, Race, Exclusion, and the Cultural Economy in Austin and San Marcos, Texas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12233.

Council of Science Editors:

Reyes DD. Dress Code Policies, Race, Exclusion, and the Cultural Economy in Austin and San Marcos, Texas. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2020. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12233

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