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You searched for +publisher:"Texas Medical Center" +contributor:("Edward F. Jackson, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas Medical Center

1. Bosca, Ryan J. Methodological Development of a Multi-Parametric Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Framework for Assessing Treatment Response with MRI.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Texas Medical Center

Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIBs) are increasingly being incorporated into early phase clinical trials as a means of non-invasively assessing the spatially heterogeneous treatment response to anticancer therapies, particularly as indicators for early response. MR QIBs are derived from the analysis of in vivo imaging data, such as that acquired via dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), dynamic susceptibility enhanced (DSC), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). To date, preclinical and clinical applications of such QIBs have provided strong evidence for potential efficacy, but efforts to create meaningful estimates of localized treatment response using multiple QIBs have been stifled by the need for rigorous characterization of biases and variances inherent in MR equipment and analysis tools and a suitable means of associating QIB changes with treatment response. This research sought to develop such a framework, incorporating multiple MRI QIBs associated with the microvascular environment, e.g., permeability, flow, and volume, and the cellular environment, e.g., water diffusion, into a single classification model to generate maps of predicted locoregional response. To ensure treatment associated changes measured in vivo exceeded equipment related levels of bias and variance, two phantoms were developed. Weekly assessment of the MR imaging data from which the QIBs were derived resulted in coefficients of variation less than 15% for QIBs assessed, well below the expected treatment related changes (approximately 40%). Bias and variance associated with the software tools developed to facilitate longitudinal assessments of treatment response, QUATTRO, was also assessed using synthesized imaging data mimicking clinically relevant acquisitions schema, and found to introduce negligible levels of bias and variance. Finally, to develop an integrated approach to assessing response using multiple QIBs, two experienced radiation oncologists contoured regions of partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD) on rigidly co-registered high grade brain tumor patient data sets, which included DCE, DSC, and DTI acquisitions. Response matched voxel-by-voxel QIBs were trained using an ordinal regression classifier. Using leave-one-out cross-validation, the prediction accuracies of the best model (single DTI QIB) were found to be, mean (standard error), 69.0 (11.1)% for SD, 35.2 (11.7)% for PD, and 52.3(9.7)% overall. In summary, this work resulted in the development of a comprehensive framework for predicting voxelwise radiological treatment response, including the development of phantoms and associated acquisitions for MR equipment quality control and establishment of system-related bias and variance, and a comprehensive software package for performing related image analyses and outcome prediction. Advisors/Committee Members: Edward F. Jackson, Ph.D., Lei Dong, Ph.D., Valen E. Johnson, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Glioblastoma; ordinal regression; software; quantitative imaging; Medicine and Health Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bosca, R. J. (2014). Methodological Development of a Multi-Parametric Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Framework for Assessing Treatment Response with MRI. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Medical Center. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/443

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bosca, Ryan J. “Methodological Development of a Multi-Parametric Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Framework for Assessing Treatment Response with MRI.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Medical Center. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/443.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bosca, Ryan J. “Methodological Development of a Multi-Parametric Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Framework for Assessing Treatment Response with MRI.” 2014. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Bosca RJ. Methodological Development of a Multi-Parametric Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Framework for Assessing Treatment Response with MRI. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Medical Center; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/443.

Council of Science Editors:

Bosca RJ. Methodological Development of a Multi-Parametric Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Framework for Assessing Treatment Response with MRI. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Medical Center; 2014. Available from: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/443


Texas Medical Center

2. Chiang, Yun-Chen. Development of HIF-1α/HIF-1β heterodimerization inhibitors using a novel bioluminescence reporter assay system for in vitro high throughput screening and in vivo imaging.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Texas Medical Center

Tumor growth often outpaces its vascularization, leading to development of a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. In response, an intracellular hypoxia survival pathway is initiated by heterodimerization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-1β, which subsequently upregulates the expression of several hypoxia-inducible genes, promotes cell survival and stimulates angiogenesis in the oxygen-deprived environment. Hypoxic tumor regions are often associated with resistance to various classes of radio- or chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, development of HIF-1α/β heterodimerization inhibitors may provide a novel approach to anti-cancer therapy. To this end, a novel approach for imaging HIF-1α/β heterodimerization in vitro and in vivo was developed in this study. Using this screening platform, we identified a promising lead candidate and further chemically derivatized the lead candidate to assess the structure-activity relationship (SAR). The most effective first generation drug inhibitors were selected and their pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor efficacy in vivo were verified by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of HIF-1α/β heterodimerization in the xenograft tumor model. Furthermore, the first generation drug inhibitors, M-TMCP and D-TMCP, demonstrated efficacy as monotherapies, resulting in tumor growth inhibition via disruption of HIF-1 signaling-mediated tumor stromal neoangiogenesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Juri Gelovani, M.D., Ph.D., Victor Krasnykh, Ph.D., Edward F. Jackson, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: HIF-1α/β heterodimerization; HIF-1α inhibitor; cancer therapy; molecular imaging; high-content screnning; split luciferase complementation assay; Medical Biotechnology; Medical Molecular Biology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Pharmaceutics and Drug Design; Therapeutics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chiang, Y. (2013). Development of HIF-1α/HIF-1β heterodimerization inhibitors using a novel bioluminescence reporter assay system for in vitro high throughput screening and in vivo imaging. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Medical Center. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/383

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chiang, Yun-Chen. “Development of HIF-1α/HIF-1β heterodimerization inhibitors using a novel bioluminescence reporter assay system for in vitro high throughput screening and in vivo imaging.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Medical Center. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/383.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chiang, Yun-Chen. “Development of HIF-1α/HIF-1β heterodimerization inhibitors using a novel bioluminescence reporter assay system for in vitro high throughput screening and in vivo imaging.” 2013. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Chiang Y. Development of HIF-1α/HIF-1β heterodimerization inhibitors using a novel bioluminescence reporter assay system for in vitro high throughput screening and in vivo imaging. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Medical Center; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/383.

Council of Science Editors:

Chiang Y. Development of HIF-1α/HIF-1β heterodimerization inhibitors using a novel bioluminescence reporter assay system for in vitro high throughput screening and in vivo imaging. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Medical Center; 2013. Available from: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/383


Texas Medical Center

3. Taylor, Brian A. Dynamic Chemical Shift Imaging for Image-Guided Thermal Therapy.

Degree: PhD, 2010, Texas Medical Center

Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) is recognized as a noninvasive means to provide temperature imaging for guidance in thermal therapies. The most common method of estimating temperature changes in the body using MR is by measuring the water proton resonant frequency (PRF) shift. Calculation of the complex phase difference (CPD) is the method of choice for measuring the PRF indirectly since it facilitates temperature mapping with high spatiotemporal resolution. Chemical shift imaging (CSI) techniques can provide the PRF directly with high sensitivity to temperature changes while minimizing artifacts commonly seen in CPD techniques. However, CSI techniques are currently limited by poor spatiotemporal resolution. This research intends to develop and validate a CSI-based MRTI technique with intentional spectral undersampling which allows relaxed parameters to improve spatiotemporal resolution. An algorithm based on autoregressive moving average (ARMA) modeling is developed and validated to help overcome limitations of Fourier-based analysis allowing highly accurate and precise PRF estimates. From the determined acquisition parameters and ARMA modeling, robust maps of temperature using the k-means algorithm are generated and validated in laser treatments in ex vivo tissue. The use of non-PRF based measurements provided by the technique is also investigated to aid in the validation of thermal damage predicted by an Arrhenius rate dose model. Advisors/Committee Members: R. Jason Stafford, Ph.D., John D. Hazle, Ph.D., Edward F. Jackson, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Magnetic Resonance; Chemical Shift Imaging; Thermal Therapy; Steighlitz-McBride; Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA); k-means; Other Physics; Radiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, B. A. (2010). Dynamic Chemical Shift Imaging for Image-Guided Thermal Therapy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Medical Center. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/57

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Brian A. “Dynamic Chemical Shift Imaging for Image-Guided Thermal Therapy.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Medical Center. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/57.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Brian A. “Dynamic Chemical Shift Imaging for Image-Guided Thermal Therapy.” 2010. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Taylor BA. Dynamic Chemical Shift Imaging for Image-Guided Thermal Therapy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Medical Center; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/57.

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor BA. Dynamic Chemical Shift Imaging for Image-Guided Thermal Therapy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Medical Center; 2010. Available from: http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/utgsbs_dissertations/57

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