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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("de Ruiter, Darryl J"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Trask, Willa Rachel. Missionization and Shifting Mobility on the Southeastern Maya-Spanish Frontier: Identifying Immigration to the Maya Site of Tipu, Belize Through the Use of Strontium and Oxygen Isotopes.

Degree: PhD, Anthropology, 2018, Texas A&M University

The early Colonial Period visita mission cemetery Tipu represents an important opportunity to understand the role mobility played in indigenous Maya resistance on the southeastern Maya-Spanish frontier. This dissertation seeks to identify the geographical origin of a subset (N=195) of the over 600 Postclassic and early Colonial period Maya buried at Tipu. As geographic and cultural frontier, Tipu experienced a dynamic history of fluctuating political alliances and was a pivotal player in frontier politics. Ethnohistorical records indicate that the remote frontier community of Tipu functioned as a place of refuge for a large southern exodus of indigenous Maya from the northern Yucatan escaping the hardships encountered in more populated regions under Spanish colonial control; to date little concrete evidence for this migration has been identified. To test whether the frontier community of Tipu functioned as a haven for refugee Yucatec Maya, strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes are used as geologic and climatic tracers to estimate potential childhood homelands for individuals buried at Tipu. Individuals comprising the Postclassic sample are used as a proxy to help establish the “local” range and to aid in the identification of shifts in mobility from the Postclassic to the Colonial period. A comparison of 87Sr^/86Sr and δ18O data from the Postclassic and Colonial period samples shows an increase in the quantity of Colonial period individuals falling within the “local” range, as well as a dramatic increase in the total variability and range of observed isotope values in the Colonial period. Nearly two-thirds of the Colonial Tipu population were classified as non-local, suggesting that Tipu was primarily composed of recent, first-generation migrants; a highly mobile population is consistent with ethnohistoric records for Tipu. These results indicate Spanish colonialism resulted in a significant and swift shift in mobility of the indigenous Maya, even in more peripheral frontier regions like Tipu, and underscores Tipu’s importance as a refugee for fleeing Maya. The presence of migrants from both Spanish and Maya held territories provides evidence for the fluidity of the Maya-Spanish frontier and Tipu’s importance as a gateway for trade between the two territories. Sex-based differences between migrants and locals are observed, and possible spatial patterns in the distribution of isotope values are explored. This research provides an increased realization of indigenous reactions to early European colonialism in frontier areas. Advisors/Committee Members: Wright, Lori E (advisor), Carlson, David L (committee member), de Ruiter, Darryl J (committee member), Thomas, Deborah J (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Bioarchaeology; Maya; Isotopes; mobility; migration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Trask, W. R. (2018). Missionization and Shifting Mobility on the Southeastern Maya-Spanish Frontier: Identifying Immigration to the Maya Site of Tipu, Belize Through the Use of Strontium and Oxygen Isotopes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174168

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trask, Willa Rachel. “Missionization and Shifting Mobility on the Southeastern Maya-Spanish Frontier: Identifying Immigration to the Maya Site of Tipu, Belize Through the Use of Strontium and Oxygen Isotopes.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174168.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trask, Willa Rachel. “Missionization and Shifting Mobility on the Southeastern Maya-Spanish Frontier: Identifying Immigration to the Maya Site of Tipu, Belize Through the Use of Strontium and Oxygen Isotopes.” 2018. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Trask WR. Missionization and Shifting Mobility on the Southeastern Maya-Spanish Frontier: Identifying Immigration to the Maya Site of Tipu, Belize Through the Use of Strontium and Oxygen Isotopes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174168.

Council of Science Editors:

Trask WR. Missionization and Shifting Mobility on the Southeastern Maya-Spanish Frontier: Identifying Immigration to the Maya Site of Tipu, Belize Through the Use of Strontium and Oxygen Isotopes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174168


Texas A&M University

2. Carlson, Keely Britt. Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba.

Degree: PhD, Anthropology, 2014, Texas A&M University

The present study involves the developmental simulation of the adult cranial morphology of the newly discovered species, Australopithecus sediba. Au. sediba has been the focus of considerable discussion and debate in paleoanthropology, following its announcement as a new species in 2010. The unique mosaic morphology of the Malapa hominins - with features aligning them to both earlier species of australopith as well as later Homo - has led some to hypothesize that Au. sediba represents the best candidate ancestor to the genus Homo. To date, only a single, relatively complete cranium has been recovered from the Malapa fossil site, belonging to the type specimen designated MH1. While its second molars are erupted and in occlusion, the third molars remain in the crypt, indicating the juvenile status of MH1. Some commentators have suggested that, because MH1 was a juvenile, its morphology may have changed substantially as it progressed towards adulthood. Further, these changes may have been significant enough to alter current interpretations of its morphological affinities, including traits thought to align Au. sediba with the genus Homo. As such, understanding the degree and nature of change to be expected to occur between second and third molar eruption is of crucial importance. The present study has addressed this problem using 3D geometric morphometric techniques for the developmental simulation of the MH1 fossil cranium. Landmark-based developmental vectors were acquired from three extant hominoid species, including chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), and modern humans (H. sapiens). Vectors were separated by sex to control for the influence of secondary sexual characteristics and applied to the reconstructed MH1 cranium. Six virtual adult crania were generated in total, a male and female from each of the three extant hominoid species used in simulation. In order to understand the morphological affinities of these generated adults in a broader comparative context, multivariate tests were carried out using a sample of non-robust hominin crania. The results indicate that the majority of morphological changes expected to occur between second and third molar eruption are related to puberty. Results acquired from principal components analysis (PCA) and Procrustes distance matrix analysis indicate that all simulated adult crania of Au. sediba show greater similarities to one another than to other hominin species. All simulated Au. sediba adults consistently clustered together with the original juvenile cranium in PCA, separate from other hominin taxa. Results acquired from distance matrices also indicate that variation within the sample of simulated adult Au. sediba crania does not exceed that of other extant hominoid species, regardless of the developmental vector applied. Therefore, the results of this study provide empirical support for a separate, species-level diagnosis for Au. sediba, and further indicate the need to account for sexual dimorphism in morphometric studies of developmental… Advisors/Committee Members: de Ruiter, Darryl J (advisor), Wright, Lori (committee member), Carlson, David (committee member), DeWitt, Thomas J (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Australopithecus sediba; geometric morphometrics; developmental simulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carlson, K. B. (2014). Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153581

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carlson, Keely Britt. “Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 09, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153581.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carlson, Keely Britt. “Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba.” 2014. Web. 09 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Carlson KB. Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2021 May 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153581.

Council of Science Editors:

Carlson KB. Developmental Simulation of the Adult Cranial Morphology of Australopithecus sediba. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153581

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