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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Wilkins, Robert N."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Powell, Robert Andrew. Ecology of Wintering Black-capped Vireos in Mexico.

Degree: PhD, Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, 2013, Texas A&M University

The black-capped vireo (Vireo atricapilla) is an endangered Neotropical migratory songbird that has received considerable attention in its breeding range, but relatively little attention in its winter range in Mexico. To address information needs regarding winter ecology of the black-capped vireo, I conducted research in Mexico focused on investigations of the winter distribution, habitat use, and migratory linkages between breeding and wintering sites. Over 3 winter periods in 2002–2004, I identified and described the geographic distribution for the black-capped vireo at study sites across 8 states in western Mexico and determined if differential migration occurs among different classes of individuals. I documented winter occupancy in the 5 most northern Mexican states surveyed (Sinaloa, Durango, Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima), and identified a strong association between sex/age class and winter latitude with adult males occupying habitat at more northern latitudes relative to females and juveniles. During two winters in 2003-2004, I conducted field research at study sites in Mexico to evaluate patterns of winter habitat use by black-capped vireos and determine which habitat characteristics may influence vireo use of winter patches. Winter habitat use by black-capped vireos was best predicted by increasing values of slope and foliage cover, and by decreasing values of canopy cover and tree diameter. Vireo use plots characterized as thorn forest had greater foliage density, greater shrub density, less canopy cover, and smaller tree diameter than plots classified as tropical deciduous or semi-deciduous forest, suggesting that thorn forests may be most suitable for vireo occupancy during the winter months. I also used stable carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopes in black-capped vireo feathers obtained across 3 states in the breeding range and 8 states in the wintering range to determine if vireo feathers collected on the wintering grounds could be used to assess breeding origins and to determine if a relationship exists between breeding and wintering latitudes such as chain or leapfrog migration. Feathers collected at both breeding and wintering sites displayed considerable variability in isotopic composition for all 3 isotopes analyzed, and thus did not provide sufficient information to establish migratory linkages between breeding and wintering sites. Advisors/Committee Members: Slack, Robert D (advisor), Wilkins, Robert N (committee member), Grant, William E (committee member), Wu, X B (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: black-capped vireo; conservation; differential migration; endangered species; habitat use; latitudinal segregation; Mexico; migratory connectivity; stable isotopes; Vireo atricapilla; winter distribution

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APA (6th Edition):

Powell, R. A. (2013). Ecology of Wintering Black-capped Vireos in Mexico. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151802

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Powell, Robert Andrew. “Ecology of Wintering Black-capped Vireos in Mexico.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151802.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Powell, Robert Andrew. “Ecology of Wintering Black-capped Vireos in Mexico.” 2013. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Powell RA. Ecology of Wintering Black-capped Vireos in Mexico. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2013. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151802.

Council of Science Editors:

Powell RA. Ecology of Wintering Black-capped Vireos in Mexico. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151802


Texas A&M University

2. Dube, Amanda M. Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age.

Degree: MS, Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, 2014, Texas A&M University

Currently, recovery efforts for the federally endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW; Picoides borealis) primarily occur on public lands throughout the Southeast, where proven management practices ensure availability of mature, open pine savannahs able to support populations. Many populations on public lands are approaching carrying capacity, suggesting RCW management on private lands will become increasingly important to achieve recovery goals. Recovery on private lands will involve developing recruitment clusters through management practices that produce sufficient quality and spatial aggregation of trees age 60 or older to provide nesting habitat, and trees age 30 or older to provide foraging habitat, as outlined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Recovery Plan. In this analysis, relationships between tree age, canopy height, and site index were applied to land cover, LiDAR-derived canopy height, and expected site index data in a geographic information system (GIS) to produce a tree age model for pines on private lands in eastern North Carolina. Modeling provided a means to spatially and temporally identify recovery opportunities over the next 10 to 40 years, predict locations for potential recruitment clusters within the next 10 years, and assess connectivity between potential recruitment clusters. Depending on predominant species, modeling produced acceptable estimates for tree age and suitability timeframes for 69-95% and 85-92% of surveyed parcels, respectively, compared to expected age and suitability timeframes derived from field-collected diameter at breast height (DBH). Over 90% of existing RCW clusters on public lands were modeled to contain trees age 40 or older, suggesting age was underestimated in some cases. Results indicate almost 80% of existing pines will remain too young over the next 10 years to support RCW cavity trees. However, over 3,000 potential recruitment cluster sites were identified. These could contribute to increased carrying capacity by providing habitat for potential breeding groups, and create links between existing populations. The prevalence of young pines suggests more opportunities to create RCW recruitment clusters will become available over time with proper habitat and population management. Modeling such as done in this study can serve as a valuable conservation planning tool to guide recovery efforts over space and time. Advisors/Committee Members: Lopez, Roel R (advisor), Feagin, Russel A (committee member), Popescu, Sorin C (committee member), Wilkins, Robert N (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: red-cockaded woodpecker; recovery; LiDAR; GIS

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dube, A. M. (2014). Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154015

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dube, Amanda M. “Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154015.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dube, Amanda M. “Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age.” 2014. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Dube AM. Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154015.

Council of Science Editors:

Dube AM. Forecasting Recovery Opportunities for the Red-cockaded Woodpecker on Private Lands in Eastern North Carolina Using a Spatial Model of Tree Age. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154015

3. Bedgood, Mark Andrew. Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module.

Degree: MS, Agricultural Education, 2005, Texas A&M University

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the development and initial use of Texas Cooperative Extension’s (TCE) White-tailed Deer Management Module (WDMM) delivered over the Internet. The results of this study will provide suggestions about future online wildlife management modules. Data were collected from two populations using questionnaires. A sample of six county Extension agents (CEA’s) and four Extension specialists were selected by an Extension wildlife specialist who perceived them to be professionals in the fields of wildlife and range management. This first sample is also referred to as change agents. The second sample, also known as early users, consisted of 27 anonymous CEA’s and landowners within TCE’s District 10. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to collect and analyze data. The results are as follows: Thus, the development of WDMM was the responsibility of the Extension specialist and researcher. The Extension specialist and researcher did seek professional opinions on content and layout information. Results suggested that CEA’s and Extension specialists agreed the WDMM would be a beneficial educational tool for new landowners. Overall, WDMM was perceived to be user friendly, visually appealing, and provided useful content. Although most change agents responded positively to most questions, there were a few that would like to see more educationally challenging questions. For example, there were a few questions that respondents felt were of the “elementary” and “kindergarten” level. They would like more questions concerning management. The majority of early users were in support of WDMM. Data gathered from the WDMM Feedback Questionnaire agreed with data gathered from change agents. In general, most early users said that they were pleased with the WDMM. Recommendations were made based on these findings to expand the WDMM. Some of these include: 1) Expanding WDMM; 2) Replicating this study using random sampling; 3) Collecting computer knowledge and skills and demographics on future studies; 4) Developing similar modules to see if they gain the same positive response. Advisors/Committee Members: Cummings, Scott (advisor), Boleman, Chris (committee member), Wilkins, Robert N. (committee member), Vestal, Tom A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Development; Assessment; Texas Cooperative Extension; White-tailed Deer; Management; Module

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bedgood, M. A. (2005). Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1411

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bedgood, Mark Andrew. “Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1411.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bedgood, Mark Andrew. “Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module.” 2005. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Bedgood MA. Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1411.

Council of Science Editors:

Bedgood MA. Development and initial assessment of Texas Cooperative Extension's white-tailed dear management module. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1411

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