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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Wilcox, Teresa, G."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Smith, Tracy R. The Exploratory Dyad that Plays Together Stays Together: Parent Play, Attachment, and Non-obvious Object Properties.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, Texas A&M University

Many developmental changes occur across the first year of life, including areas of cognitive, social, emotional, and physical growth. One challenge of developmental research is to understand the complex set of factors that influence behavior within and across these domains of functioning and change. The present research attempts to illuminate the effects that parent relationships and interactions have on infants’ ability to explore non-obvious object properties during free play. In our findings, the role of attachment, parents’ actions on objects, parental sensitivity during play, and synchronous interaction all related to an increase in infants’ object exploration when playing alone versus playing with a parent. These parent relationship and interaction factors affected infants’ exploration differently at 6 months than 12 months. Overall, relational factors appeared of greater important for infants’ more thorough object exploration than simply parents’ actions on objects. The social context was important for the cognitive outcome of infants’ object exploration. Advisors/Committee Members: Wilcox, Teresa G. (advisor), Alexander, Gerianne (committee member), Gabbard, Carl (committee member), Liew, Jeffrey (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: infant development; parent-infant interaction; object exploration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, T. R. (2011). The Exploratory Dyad that Plays Together Stays Together: Parent Play, Attachment, and Non-obvious Object Properties. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7763

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Tracy R. “The Exploratory Dyad that Plays Together Stays Together: Parent Play, Attachment, and Non-obvious Object Properties.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7763.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Tracy R. “The Exploratory Dyad that Plays Together Stays Together: Parent Play, Attachment, and Non-obvious Object Properties.” 2011. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Smith TR. The Exploratory Dyad that Plays Together Stays Together: Parent Play, Attachment, and Non-obvious Object Properties. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7763.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith TR. The Exploratory Dyad that Plays Together Stays Together: Parent Play, Attachment, and Non-obvious Object Properties. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7763


Texas A&M University

2. Woods, Rebecca Jindalee. Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2009, Texas A&M University

The ability to individuate objects is one of our most fundamental cognitive capacities. Recent research has revealed that, when objects vary in color or luminance alone, infants fail to individuate until 11.5 months. However, color and luminance frequently co-vary in the natural environment, and color and luminance interact in pattern detection, motion detection, and stereopsis. For this reason, we propose that infants may be more likely to individuate when objects vary in both color and luminance. Using the narrow-screen task of Wilcox and Baillargeon, Experiments 1 and 2 assessed 7.5-month-old infants’ ability to individuate uniformly colored objects that either varied in both color and luminance or varied in luminance alone. The results indicated that infants used these features to individuate only when the objects varied in both color and luminance. Thus, when color and luminance co-varied, infants used these features to individuate objects a full 4 months earlier than infants use either feature alone. Experiment 3 further explored the link between color and luminance by assessing 7.5-month-old infants’ ability to use pattern differences to individuate objects. Although infants use pattern differences created from a combination of luminance and color contrast by 7.5 months, results from Experiment 3 indicated that when pattern was created from either color contrast or luminance contrast alone, infants fail to individuate based on pattern. The results of Experiment 3 suggest that it is not the number of feature dimensions that is important, but the unique contribution of both color and luminance that is particularly salient to infants. These studies add to a growing body of literature investigating the interaction of color and luminance in object processing in infants, and have implications for developmental changes in the nature and content of infants’ object representations. Advisors/Committee Members: Wilcox, Teresa, G. (advisor), Alexander, Gerianne (committee member), Bortfeld, Heather (committee member), Gabbard, Carl (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: object individuation; infant

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woods, R. J. (2009). Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1858

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woods, Rebecca Jindalee. “Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1858.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woods, Rebecca Jindalee. “Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance.” 2009. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Woods RJ. Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1858.

Council of Science Editors:

Woods RJ. Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1858


Texas A&M University

3. Park, Jin Gyu. Environmental color for pediatric patient room design.

Degree: PhD, Architecture, 2009, Texas A&M University

Color has a large impact on our psychological and physiological responses. This study examines the value of color as a component in a healing environment for pediatric patient rooms by measuring color preferences among healthy children, pediatric patients, and design professionals. Environmental satisfaction is a significant mediator between the physical environment and children’s health. Previous color preference studies have typically been done with small color chips or papers, which are very different from seeing a color applied on wall surfaces. A simulation method allowed for investigating the value of color in real contexts and controlling confounding variables. The findings of this study demonstrated that blue and green are the most preferred, and white the least preferred color, by both children and design professionals. Children’s gender differences were found in that boys prefer red and purple less than girls. Pediatric patients reported lower preference scores for yellow than did healthy children. These findings lead to color application guidelines for designers to understand color more and eventually to create better environments for children and their families. Advisors/Committee Members: Shepley, Mardelle M. (advisor), Tassinary, Louis G. (committee member), Varni, James W. (committee member), Wilcox, Teresa G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Color preference; Pediatric patient; Healthcare; Environmental design; Architectural space

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Park, J. G. (2009). Environmental color for pediatric patient room design. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2420

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Park, Jin Gyu. “Environmental color for pediatric patient room design.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2420.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Park, Jin Gyu. “Environmental color for pediatric patient room design.” 2009. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Park JG. Environmental color for pediatric patient room design. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2420.

Council of Science Editors:

Park JG. Environmental color for pediatric patient room design. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2420

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