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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Welsh, Cristabel J"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Graham, Jennifer Margaret. The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2016, Texas A&M University

The purpose of this literature review is to examine whether Pavlovian eye blink conditioning in the rabbit consists solely of a specific motor reflex or involves other extracerebellar control systems. Castiglioni et al. (2009) utilized a transfer design in which retention of learning in different environments and the expression of the original learning was not limited to a single motor reflex measure. Subjects were trained in a traditional Pavlovian stock to differentiate between an S+ signal of a brief tone paired with an unconditioned stimulus (US) of cutaneous shock. Then, subjects were tested for what they had learned in a different environment. The results showed that the presentation of the S+ produced completely different behavior in the open environment as compared to the Pavlovian stock. In the restricted environment of the Pavlovian stock, presentation of the S+ produced eye blink responses without any additional motor or emotional reactions. In the transfer environment, reaction to the S+ produced: (a) a prolonged disruption of ongoing behavior, (b) a wide range of complex emotional responses, and (c) a complete absence of eye blink response. Reaction to the S- in the Pavlovian stock or in the open environment, did not elicit an eye blink response. These findings provide strong evidence that Pavlovian conditioning is not just a specific motor reflex, but instead involves a difference in meaning and significance of the S+ for the subjects when presented in two discrete environments. This is observed in the subjects’ different response patterns which unmasked a significant emotional component of the conditioning. This lead to the conclusion that nictitating membrane (NM) conditioning consists of more than an invariant, discrete cerebellar oculomotor reflex. The clear emotional component to the conditioning indicates the involvement of extracerebellar control mechanisms, potentially a widespread cerebral network in addition to the microcerebellar control of the specific motor reflex, a contradiction to current neuromodels. Advisors/Committee Members: Welsh, Cristabel J (advisor), Steele-Russell, Ian (committee member), Pine, Michelle (committee member), Tizard, Ian (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Pavlovian conditioning; eye blink; nictitating membrane; rabbit

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APA (6th Edition):

Graham, J. M. (2016). The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Graham, Jennifer Margaret. “The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Graham, Jennifer Margaret. “The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Graham JM. The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307.

Council of Science Editors:

Graham JM. The Effects of Pavlovian Conditioning in Two Discrete Environments. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156307


Texas A&M University

2. Johnson, Reed Findley. Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region.

Degree: PhD, Medical Sciences, 2004, Texas A&M University

Mouse Hepatitis virus (MHV) is a member of the coronavirus family in the order Nidovirales. The 32 kb genome contains cis-acting sequences necessary for replication of the viral genome. Those cis-acting sequences have been shown to bind host proteins, and binding of those proteins is necessary for virus replication. One of the cis-acting elements is the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element. Previous work has demonstrated that mitochondrial aconitase, mitochondrial heat shock protein 70, heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 40 bind to the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element. We demonstrated that RNA secondary structure of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element is necessary for host protein binding in vitro. We also demonstrate that primary structure of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element is necessary for viral replication by targeted recombination. DI replication assays infer that the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element plays a role in positive strand synthesis from the negative strand template. Current studies involve the infectious cDNA clone, which will provide definitive answers on the role of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element in MHV replication. Advisors/Committee Members: Leibowitz, Julian L. (advisor), Wilson, Van G. (committee member), Welsh, Cristabel J. (committee member), Maxwell, Steve (committee member), Struck, Douglas K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mouse Hepatitis Virus; replication; virus; 3'UTR; host protein interaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, R. F. (2004). Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/125

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Reed Findley. “Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/125.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Reed Findley. “Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region.” 2004. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson RF. Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/125.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson RF. Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/125


Texas A&M University

3. Nayak, Mamatha Somanath. Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2004, Texas A&M University

Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is classified as a Cardiovirus in the Picornaviridae family. An enteric virus, TMEV, spreads within the mouse population by the fecal-oral route. The neurovirulent GDVII strain of Theiler's virus causes a fatal encephalitis in all strains of mice following intra-cranial infection of the virus. Persistent BeAn strain of Theiler's virus causes a demyelinating disease in susceptible strains of mice, which is similar to the human disease - Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Although a well-recognized model for MS, the route of entry of the virus into the central nervous system (CNS) following natural infection has not been well understood. One of the proposed portals of entry includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This report indicates the ability of both the neurovirulent and the persistent strains of Theiler's virus to induce apoptosis in the functional units of the BBB - the cerebrovascular endothelial cells (CVE) both in vitro and in vivo. Induction of apoptosis in CVE was demonstrated by Annexin staining, electron microscopy, DNA fragmentation assay, Hoechst staining and by caspase-3 staining. Corresponding to results by other authors, GDVII is a stronger inducer of apoptosis in CVE compared to BeAn. Induction of apoptosis is dependent on the MOI of the virus. UV-inactivated virus is not capable of inducing apoptosis and induction of apoptosis appears to be an internal event not requiring activation of death receptors. Determining the pathway of induction of apoptosis by TMEV in CVE indicated the involvement of a Ca2+ dependent pathway for apoptosis - the calpain pathway. Involvement of calpain in apoptosis has been reported in MS. Induction of apoptosis in CVE in vivo was also demonstrated following the intra-peritoneal inoculation of Theiler's virus. Induction of apoptosis in CVE following Theiler' virus infection could lead to a breach of the BBB and entry of inflammatory cells as well as virus into the central nervous system. This finding could aid understanding the neuropathogenesis of Theiler's virus. Advisors/Committee Members: Welsh, Cristabel J. (advisor), Moyes, Rita J. (advisor), Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn (committee member), Tesh, Vernon L. (committee member), Miranda, Rajesh C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Theiler's virus; Apoptosis; Cerebrovascular endothelial cells; Multiple Sclerosis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nayak, M. S. (2004). Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/347

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nayak, Mamatha Somanath. “Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/347.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nayak, Mamatha Somanath. “Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells.” 2004. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Nayak MS. Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/347.

Council of Science Editors:

Nayak MS. Theiler's virus-induced apoptosis in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/347

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