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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Washburn, Shannon E"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Sawant, Onkar Balkrishna. Effects of Maternal L-glutamine Supplementation on Fetus to Mitigate Teratogenic Effects of Alcohol.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Sciences, 2013, Texas A&M University

Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy are at high risk of giving birth to children with physical, behavioral or cognitive developmental problems called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Prenatal alcohol exposure is known to be associated with fetal growth restriction, disturbances in amino acid bioavailability, and alterations in fetal hemodynamics, blood flow and oxidative stress. Alterations in these parameters can persist into adolescence and low birth weight can lead to altered fetal development and programming, which can have lifelong consequences. Glutamine has been associated with fetal nitrogen and carbon metabolism, synthesis of the cellular anti-oxidant glutathione, apoptosis suppression, serving as a precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids, and increases in protein synthesis. Glutamine has been used clinically as a nutrient supplement in low birth weight infants. Therefore, it is hypothesized that repeated third trimester-equivalent maternal alcohol exposure in the sheep model decreases the bioavailability of amino acids, hampers fetal body growth, alters maternal-fetal hemodynamics, hampers uterine blood flow, alters fetal blood flow, increases cerebellar oxidative stress and that maternal L-glutamine supplementation may attenuate these negative developmental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. Maternal alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent period in the sheep model significantly reduced fetal body weight, height, crown-rump length and thoracic girth, and maternal glutamine supplementation successfully improved these fetal growth parameters in the alcohol+glutamine group. Maternal alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent period resulted in significant reduction in glutamine and glutamine related amino acids bioavailability in maternal and fetal plasma as well as in the fetal amniotic and allantoic fluid. Maternal glutamine supplementation improved the bioavailability and efficacy of amino acids in the maternal and fetal compartment. This study also revealed that maternal alcohol exposure resulted in maternal acidemia, maternal hypercapnea, maternal hypoxemia as well as fetal acidemia and fetal hypercapnea, but not fetal hypoxemia. Maternal alcohol exposure during this period led to an increase in fetal mean arterial pressure, alterations in fetal brain blood flow and fetal cerebellar oxidative stress. Maternal alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent period resulted in a more than 40% reduction in uterine artery blood flow. Maternal glutamine supplementation during the third trimester-equivalent period successfully attenuated the incidences of alcohol-induced maternal hypercapnea, fetal acidemia, alterations in fetal brain blood flow and improved the fetal cerebellar endogenous antioxidant status. Collectively these results signify that maternal glutamine supplementation mitigates negative developmental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. Advisors/Committee Members: Washburn, Shannon E (advisor), Wu, Guoyao (committee member), Miranda, Rajesh (committee member), Golding, Michael (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: FASD; Teratology; Glutamine; Alcohol; Blood-flow

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sawant, O. B. (2013). Effects of Maternal L-glutamine Supplementation on Fetus to Mitigate Teratogenic Effects of Alcohol. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151882

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sawant, Onkar Balkrishna. “Effects of Maternal L-glutamine Supplementation on Fetus to Mitigate Teratogenic Effects of Alcohol.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 30, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151882.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sawant, Onkar Balkrishna. “Effects of Maternal L-glutamine Supplementation on Fetus to Mitigate Teratogenic Effects of Alcohol.” 2013. Web. 30 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Sawant OB. Effects of Maternal L-glutamine Supplementation on Fetus to Mitigate Teratogenic Effects of Alcohol. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2013. [cited 2020 Nov 30]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151882.

Council of Science Editors:

Sawant OB. Effects of Maternal L-glutamine Supplementation on Fetus to Mitigate Teratogenic Effects of Alcohol. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151882


Texas A&M University

2. Padgett, Ashley Loren. Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2018, Texas A&M University

Designing perioperative analgesic regimen for ruminants is problematic as pain assessment is difficult and pregnancy adds additional considerations. The aim of this study was to assess the nociceptive properties of intramuscularly administered buprenorphine and transdermally administered fentanyl utilizing a composite pain score system. To better confirm that the observed abnormal behavior was related to pain, the current study attempted to characterize the nociceptive properties of the analgesic agents at a given plasma drug concentration, which has not previously been done. Additionally, the study characterized transplacental movement of analgesic agents via fetal plasma drug concentrations. In this study, we compared intramuscularly administered buprenorphine at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg every 8 hours for 48 hours starting at induction for surgery (n=6) to transdermal fentanyl patches (n=6) applied in the dorsal thorax region 24 hours before surgery at a dose of 2μg/kg/hr for postoperative pain. Ewe blood samples were collected and signs of pain and sedation were measured 24 hours before surgery (time -24), induction to surgery (time 0), and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48 hours after. Using an indwelling fetal arterial catheter that was placed during the surgery, fetal blood pressure was recorded and blood samples were collected. Drug concentrations were measured in maternal and fetal plasma and amniotic fluid. The buprenorphine treated ewes exhibited more pain consistent behaviors than those treated with fentanyl, and their postoperative pain scores were significantly higher than the preoperative value. There were also significant differences in cardiovascular variables from the anesthesia records between the two groups. Overall, transdermal administration of fentanyl provided adequate analgesia with little adverse effects, making it a candidate for optimal postoperative pain management in sheep. Advisors/Committee Members: Washburn, Shannon E (advisor), Lepiz, Mauricio L (committee member), Fajt, Virginia R (committee member), Patterson, Carly (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: transdermal fentanyl; opioids; pregnant sheep; buprenorphine; analgesia; anesthesia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Padgett, A. L. (2018). Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Padgett, Ashley Loren. “Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 30, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Padgett, Ashley Loren. “Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep.” 2018. Web. 30 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Padgett AL. Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 30]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041.

Council of Science Editors:

Padgett AL. Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041


Texas A&M University

3. Birch, Sharla Mae. Advanced Imaging of Disease: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Degree: PhD, Veterinary Pathobiology, 2016, Texas A&M University

Advanced imaging techniques are being increasingly utilized as quantitative biomarkers and outcome parameters to identify and monitor disease and evaluate new treatments. Validation of these techniques in animal models is imperative to reliably interpret results and apply them clinically in humans. Studies reported here utilized computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize the sheep model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and the golden retriever (GRMD) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Objective biomarkers are necessary to help identify some children with (FASD) who do not demonstrate the facial dysmorphology criterion for diagnosis. The sheep model of first trimester binge alcohol exposure was used to study the utility of CT and MRI to distinguish disease. Based on CT assessment, total skull bone volume was significantly more sensitive than cranial circumference in identifying 6-month-old lambs exposed to binge alcohol. Poor nutrition may also contribute to adverse developmental outcomes of prenatal alcohol exposure and choline supplementation has shown benefit in rodent models. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to study the brains of 6-month-old lambs from alcohol-exposed pregnant sheep supplemented with and without choline throughout pregnancy. Total brain volume in lambs was reduced regardless of choline supplementation. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Therapies for DMD must be assessed using objective biomarkers such as MRI to document potential benefit. The lack of studies correlating MRI indices and histopathologic lesions has limited interpretation. The pectineus muscle from GRMD dogs was used to register and correlate histology with MRI using a novel registration technique, compare histology segmentation between Aperio and a custom algorithm for automated histomorphometry, and compare metrics between 4.7T and 3T scanners. We found that histology and MR images co-registered but metrics were poorly correlated. Aperio and the custom algorithm had similar results and with optimization, it could be applied to the current research. Only T1 values were correlated between MRI scanners but neither T1 values, nor any of the 3T metrics correlated with histologic segmentations. Multiple imaging modalities outlined in this dissertation show the usefulness of objective quantitative techniques that could be adapted and applied to any disease entity. Advisors/Committee Members: Kornegay, Joe N (advisor), Washburn, Shannon E (committee member), Porter, Brian F (committee member), Lenox, Mark (committee member), Kier, Ann (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders; Duchenne muscular dystrophy; Magnetic resonance imaging; Computed Tomography; Histopathologic Correlation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Birch, S. M. (2016). Advanced Imaging of Disease: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159048

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Birch, Sharla Mae. “Advanced Imaging of Disease: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 30, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159048.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Birch, Sharla Mae. “Advanced Imaging of Disease: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.” 2016. Web. 30 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Birch SM. Advanced Imaging of Disease: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 30]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159048.

Council of Science Editors:

Birch SM. Advanced Imaging of Disease: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/159048

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