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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Varner, Gary E."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Keen, Heidi A. Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2007, Texas A&M University

Activity of group-transported horses was evaluated during onboard rest stops to determine if horses derive meaningful rest. A single-deck semi-trailer separated into three compartments was used for all shipments. In Experiment One, twelve video cameras were used to record behavior of horses during five, 16 to 20 h shipments, with a high (397.44kg/m2), medium (348.48 kg/m2) and low (220.91 kg/m2) density group in each shipment. One-hour rest stops occurred after 8 h of transport and prior to unloading, during which two groups were provided water. Movement of each horse visible on video was quantified by counting the number of times the head crossed the vertical and/or horizontal axes of the body at the withers. Mean number of movements per 5-min interval in each group (n=13) was used to compare effects of density, access to water, and order of stops. The high and low-density watered groups had increased activity during the first 10 min of both rest stops potentially due to maneuvering for access to water. The medium-density watered groups had increased activity during the first 10 min of only the second rest stop. Activity slightly increased in the medium and low-density groups after 55 min possibly indicating adequate rest, but a similar increase did not occur in highdensity groups. In Experiment Two, two shipments, lasting 23 h and 24 h respectively, consisted of three groups of horses loaded at high density (397.32 kg/m2). Ninety-minute rest stops occurred after every 6 h of transport and prior to unloading for a total of three rest stops. Percentage of visible horses "active" was averaged across each 5-min interval of the stop. Activity was highly variable within and between shipments. Activity was high at the beginning of stops one and three of Shipment One. A similar but less dramatic settling occurred at the start of all three rest stops in Shipment Two. Twenty three of thirty-four noted increases in alertness were due to aggression or noises outside the trailer. In both experiments horses remained active during all stops indicating fatigue had not become a major factor in these studies. Advisors/Committee Members: Friend, Theodore H. (advisor), Varner, Gary E. (committee member), H., Welsh Jr., Thomas (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: horse transport; rest stops

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keen, H. A. (2007). Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keen, Heidi A. “Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keen, Heidi A. “Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops.” 2007. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Keen HA. Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2007. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708.

Council of Science Editors:

Keen HA. Activity of group-transported horses during onboard rest stops. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4708


Texas A&M University

2. Shriver, Adam Joseph. What's wrong with pain?.

Degree: MA, Philosophy, 2006, Texas A&M University

The experience of pain is something that most people are extremely familiar with. However, once we begin to examine the subject from an ethical point of view, and particularly when we examine so-called marginal cases such as nonhuman animals, we are quickly confronted with difficult questions. This thesis, through an examination of a particular feature of moral language and a description of recent research on pain, provides an analysis of how pain fits into ethical theory. It is argued that universalizability is an important feature of ethical systems and provides a basis for claiming that an agent is acting inconsistently if he or she evaluates similar situations differently. Though the additional features prescriptivity and overridingness provide an important connection between moral judgment and action in Hare’s two-level utilitarianism, it is argued that they ultimately lead to claims incompatible with lived moral experience. Arguments by Parfit and Sidgwick are discussed which tie acting morally to acting consistently, and it is concluded that selfinterest theory is not a tenable position. After the features of moral judgment are discussed, the necessary features of a moral subject are examined. It is concluded that sentience, or the ability to feel pleasure or pain, is a sufficient condition for being a moral subject. Arguments are examined that attempt to show which animals likely consciously experience pain. Difficulties for these arguments are discussed and an original argument is presented that at least partially addresses these difficulties. It is concluded that from an ethical perspective our current practices such as factory farming are probably not justified. It appears especially likely that our treatment of other mammals is unethical, but the answers are not as clear with other animals. However, all of the conclusions are tentative, as no doubt future scientific investigation will shed more light on our knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Varner, Gary E. (advisor), Allen, Colin F. (committee member), Grau, Jim W. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: animal cognition; animal pain; animal welfare

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shriver, A. J. (2006). What's wrong with pain?. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shriver, Adam Joseph. “What's wrong with pain?.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shriver, Adam Joseph. “What's wrong with pain?.” 2006. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Shriver AJ. What's wrong with pain?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285.

Council of Science Editors:

Shriver AJ. What's wrong with pain?. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4285


Texas A&M University

3. Campbell, Stephen Michael. Phenomenal well-being.

Degree: MA, Philosophy, 2006, Texas A&M University

Hedonism is not terribly popular as a theory of well-being. And there are good reasons to question whether hedonism even supplies the best account of happiness. Yet hedonism captures something important, and it will be the goal of this essay to articulate just what that is. I suggest that hedonism provides the best account of phenomenal wellbeing (PWB). PWB is a restricted form of well-being that relates to the quality of the experience of a life—or, in other words, the quality of one’s phenomenal life. If wellbeing is characterized as “how well one’s life goes,” then PWB is “how well one’s life goes for her, from the inside.” In rating a life’s PWB, the life is judged solely on the basis of the contents of the experience of that life rated against the experience of the individual’s other possible lives. Unlike well-being, PWB is guaranteed to track more robust experiential benefits that a person gets out of living a life. In this work, I discuss the concept of well-being, including the feature of subjectrelativity that is sometimes ascribed to it; then, after introducing the concept of a phenomenal life, I develop the concept of phenomenal well-being. I propose what I take to be the best available account of PWB, which involves the hedonistic concept of satisfaction. An epistemic model of life-comparison (inspired by Peter Railton’s full information account of well-being) on which phenomenal lives are judged on the criterion of satisfaction is presented, followed by some objections, and replies, to PWB as satisfaction. Finally, some rival accounts of PWB are discussed and critiqued—notably, an account of cognitive life-satisfaction that resembles theories of “life-satisfaction” in happiness theory. The claim is that hedonism supplies the best answer to what makes the experience of our lives go best for us. In the closing chapter, I make some suggestions concerning the significance of this fact. Advisors/Committee Members: Varner, Gary E. (advisor), Grau, James (committee member), LeBuffe, Michael L. (committee member), Radzik, Linda C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: well-being; hedonism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Campbell, S. M. (2006). Phenomenal well-being. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3834

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Campbell, Stephen Michael. “Phenomenal well-being.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3834.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Campbell, Stephen Michael. “Phenomenal well-being.” 2006. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Campbell SM. Phenomenal well-being. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3834.

Council of Science Editors:

Campbell SM. Phenomenal well-being. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3834

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