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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Seabury, Christopher M"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Fisher, Colleen 1988-. Diversity and Evolution of the Bovine and Equine Toll-Like Receptor Gene Family: Applications to Animal Disease.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2012, Texas A&M University

Genes modulating innate immunity in mammals are generally considered the first line of defense with respect to invading pathogens and therefore it has become important to characterize naturally occurring genetic variation, and subsequently determine whether this variation is likely to be benign, beneficial, or detrimental to the host. Relevant to this study, the mammalian Toll-like receptor proteins (TLR), encoded by members of the TLR gene family, have the capacity to recognize a wide variety of pathogen ligands, and mutations within these genes have been shown to influence disease susceptibility or resistance within mammalian species. Two studies which sought to determine the frequency and distribution of naturally occurring genetic variation within the bovine and equine TLR genes revealed a large number of discrete point mutations, which were subsequently used to reconstruct haplotypes for each investigated gene across a large number of samples. Detailed analyses of haplotypes provided evidence for extensive haplotype sharing among specialized breeds, subspecies, and even divergent species. Classical and new tests of selection provided evidence for significant deviations from a strictly neutral model of molecular evolution for both cattle as well as equids, with some of the same TLR genes deviating from a strictly neutral model among divergent species. As a first step toward determining whether naturally occurring bovine TLR variation is likely to be benign, beneficial, or detrimental, we tested validated variation from bovine TLR genes capable of recognizing components of Mycobacteria for associations with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in dairy cattle, and found several SNPs that were nominally associated with disease status, thereby providing evidence for small-effect loci potentially influencing risk for differential susceptibility to Johne's disease. Advisors/Committee Members: Seabury, Christopher M (advisor), Criscitiello, Michael (committee member), Murphy, William (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Johne's Disease; Toll-like receptor; TLR; Horse Genomics; Cattle Genomics; Equine Genomics; Bovine Genomics

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APA (6th Edition):

Fisher, C. 1. (2012). Diversity and Evolution of the Bovine and Equine Toll-Like Receptor Gene Family: Applications to Animal Disease. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148065

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fisher, Colleen 1988-. “Diversity and Evolution of the Bovine and Equine Toll-Like Receptor Gene Family: Applications to Animal Disease.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148065.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fisher, Colleen 1988-. “Diversity and Evolution of the Bovine and Equine Toll-Like Receptor Gene Family: Applications to Animal Disease.” 2012. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Fisher C1. Diversity and Evolution of the Bovine and Equine Toll-Like Receptor Gene Family: Applications to Animal Disease. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148065.

Council of Science Editors:

Fisher C1. Diversity and Evolution of the Bovine and Equine Toll-Like Receptor Gene Family: Applications to Animal Disease. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148065


Texas A&M University

2. Halley-Schultz, Yvette A. A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly and Mitochondrial Population Genomics for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus).

Degree: PhD, Genetics, 2015, Texas A&M University

Wild populations of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhite) have declined across most of their historic U.S. range, and despite their importance as an experimental wildlife model for ecotoxicology studies, no bobwhite draft genome assembly has emerged. Herein, we present the first bobwhite draft de novo genome assembly, with more than 90% of the assembled bobwhite genome captured within < 40,000 final scaffolds (N50 = 45.4 Kb) despite evidence for approximately 3.22 heterozygous polymorphisms per Kb. Moreover, three annotation analyses produced evidence for > 14,000 unique genes and proteins. Bobwhite analyses of divergence with the chicken (Gallus gallus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genomes revealed many extremely conserved gene sequences, and evidence for lineage-specific divergence of noncoding regions. Coalescent models for reconstructing the demographic history of the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw were concordant with how opposing natural selection strategies (i.e., skewness in the r-/K-selection continuum) would be expected to shape genome diversity and the effective population sizes in these species. Using genomic tools and resources developed via the draft genome assembly, we evaluated the concordance of population inferences and conclusions resulting from the analysis of short mitochondrial fragments (i.e., partial or complete D-Loop nucleotide sequences) versus complete mitogenome sequences for 53 bobwhites representing six ecoregions across TX and OK (USA). Median joining (MJ) haplotype networks demonstrated that analyses performed using small mitochondrial fragments were insufficient for estimating the true (i.e., complete) mitogenome haplotype structure, corresponding levels of divergence, and maternal population history of our samples. Notably, discordant demographic inferences were observed when mismatch distributions of partial (i.e., partial D-Loop) versus complete mitogenome sequences were compared, with the reduction in mitochondrial genomic information content observed to encourage spurious inferences in our samples. A probabilistic approach to variant prediction for the complete bobwhite mitogenomes revealed 344 segregating sites corresponding to 347 total mutations, including 49 putative nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) distributed across 12 protein coding genes. Evidence of gross heteroplasmy was observed for 13 bobwhites, with 10 of the 13 heteroplasmies involving one moderate to high frequency SNV. Haplotype network and phylogenetic analyses for the complete bobwhite mitogenome sequences revealed two divergent maternal lineages (dXY = 0.00731; FST = 0.849; P < 0.05), thereby supporting the potential for two putative subspecies. However, the diverged lineage (n = 103 variants) almost exclusively involved bobwhites geographically classified as Colinus virginianus texanus, which is discordant with the expectations of previous geographic subspecies designations. Tests of adaptive evolution for functional divergence (MKT), frequency distribution… Advisors/Committee Members: Seabury, Christopher M (advisor), Murphy, William J (committee member), Criscitiello, Michael F (committee member), Womack, James E (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Genomics; Genetics; northern bobwhite

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APA (6th Edition):

Halley-Schultz, Y. A. (2015). A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly and Mitochondrial Population Genomics for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus). (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156517

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Halley-Schultz, Yvette A. “A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly and Mitochondrial Population Genomics for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus).” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156517.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Halley-Schultz, Yvette A. “A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly and Mitochondrial Population Genomics for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus).” 2015. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Halley-Schultz YA. A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly and Mitochondrial Population Genomics for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156517.

Council of Science Editors:

Halley-Schultz YA. A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly and Mitochondrial Population Genomics for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156517

3. Skiles, William Mark. Environmentally Induced Epimutations, Their Persistence, and Potential Causality in the Development of Disease in the Offspring of Exposed Individuals.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Sciences, 2017, Texas A&M University

In recent years, there has been increased interest into better understanding how environmental In recent years, there has been increased interest into better understanding how environmental exposures influence the long-term health of an organism. Chemical pollutants, dietary deficiencies, embryonic stress and multiple other external factors have all demonstrated long-lasting effects upon development, metabolism, and health even after transient exposures. The mechanisms by which these exposures can impact development far beyond the period of exposure remain largely unknown. To gain better insight into the developmental origins of both birth defects and disease, we must better understand how environmental exposures alter development. In this work, we will examine the capacity of the environment to impact chromatin states, and then determine whether these changes are heritable; and are thus potentially causal in the development of disease. This is an important question due to the recent recognition that aberrant chromatin states can lead to pathological patterns of gene expression, a circumstance commonly referred to as “epimutations”. Dysregulation of gene expression patterns during development have been shown to cause a multitude of irregular phenotypes in offspring and lifelong disorders in mature organisms. This altered chromatin state, coined an epimutation by Dr. Emma Whitelaw, is important due to the mutation not being in the genetic code itself, but in the way DNA regulatory regions are packaged within the chromatin template, and thus accessed by the protein factors directing gene transcription. The body of work presented here will examine the ability of common environmental exposures to modulate chromatin structure. We will examine these changes over time in an effort to better understand the inheritance of epigenetic change. Secondly, we will measure whether environmentally induced alterations in chromatin structure within the germline persist, and are heritable. These questions are all relevant to better understanding the developmental origins of disease. Advisors/Committee Members: Golding, Michael C (advisor), Long, Charles R (advisor), Seabury, Christopher M (committee member), Johnson, Natalie M (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: oxidative stress; assisted reproductive technologies; genomic imprinting; histone demethylase; TET; DNMT; DNA methylation; epigenetics; developmental programming; DOHAD; birth defect; epigenetics; preconception; sperm

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Skiles, W. M. (2017). Environmentally Induced Epimutations, Their Persistence, and Potential Causality in the Development of Disease in the Offspring of Exposed Individuals. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173200

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Skiles, William Mark. “Environmentally Induced Epimutations, Their Persistence, and Potential Causality in the Development of Disease in the Offspring of Exposed Individuals.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173200.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Skiles, William Mark. “Environmentally Induced Epimutations, Their Persistence, and Potential Causality in the Development of Disease in the Offspring of Exposed Individuals.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Skiles WM. Environmentally Induced Epimutations, Their Persistence, and Potential Causality in the Development of Disease in the Offspring of Exposed Individuals. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173200.

Council of Science Editors:

Skiles WM. Environmentally Induced Epimutations, Their Persistence, and Potential Causality in the Development of Disease in the Offspring of Exposed Individuals. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173200

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