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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Posey, R. Daniel"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Delgado, Amy Haley. The Social Context of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control in Texas: Foundations for Effective Risk Communication.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Sciences, 2012, Texas A&M University

The introduction of FMD into the US would have serious economic and societal effects on the livelihoods and sustainability of affected livestock producers. Livestock producers serve as an important line of defense in both detecting an introduction of FMD as well, helping to prevent disease spread. However, due to the complexity of moral, social, and economic issues surrounding the control of highly contagious diseases, producer cooperation during an outbreak may not be assured. This study was conducted using a mixed-methods approach, including qualitative analysis of interviews and quantitative analysis of a postal survey, in order to explore the factors likely to influence producer cooperation in FMD detection and control in Texas. Reporting of cattle with clinical signs of FMD in the absence of an outbreak was related to producers┬┤ beliefs about the consequences of reporting, beliefs about what other producers would do, trust in agricultural agencies, and their perception of the risk posed by FMD. During a hypothetical outbreak, intentions to report were determined by beliefs about the consequences of reporting, and perception of the risk posed by FMD. Intentions to gather and hold cattle when requested during an outbreak were determined by beliefs about the consequences of gathering and holding, beliefs about barriers to gathering and holding, trust in other producers, and perception of the risk posed by FMD. Compliance with animal movement restrictions was determined by experiential attitudes, beliefs about the availability of feed, space, and disinfection procedures, beliefs about what other producers would do, and perception of the risk posed by FMD. Recommendations for improving producer cooperation include targeting specific beliefs in both planning and communication, increasing transparency in the post-reporting process, planning for and communicating plans for maintaining business continuity in order to better inform risk perception, and partnering with organizations to ensure sustained and meaningful communication that supports trust between producers within the affected agricultural community. Advisors/Committee Members: Norby, Bo (advisor), Scott, H. Morgan (committee member), McIntosh, William A. (committee member), Posey, R. Daniel (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: foot and mouth disease; disease reporting; surveillance; foreign animal disease; theory of planned behavior; emergency response; behavior; disease control

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Delgado, A. H. (2012). The Social Context of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control in Texas: Foundations for Effective Risk Communication. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10495

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Delgado, Amy Haley. “The Social Context of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control in Texas: Foundations for Effective Risk Communication.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10495.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Delgado, Amy Haley. “The Social Context of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control in Texas: Foundations for Effective Risk Communication.” 2012. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Delgado AH. The Social Context of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control in Texas: Foundations for Effective Risk Communication. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10495.

Council of Science Editors:

Delgado AH. The Social Context of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control in Texas: Foundations for Effective Risk Communication. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10495


Texas A&M University

2. Dominguez, Brandon James. Characterization of livestock herds in extensive agricultural settings in southwest Texas.

Degree: MS, Epidemiology, 2009, Texas A&M University

Because of an ever-increasing threat of foreign animal disease outbreaks in the United States, there is a desire to develop strategies to prevent the occurrence of a foreign animal disease and control an outbreak if it does occur. Infectious disease models have been developed and are being used to determine reasonable mitigation strategies. However, little information is available concerning premises characteristics and movement of animals in extensively managed livestock areas. Hence adaptation of these models to areas where there is low livestock density is not easy. We collected empirical data, via mail out surveys, from an extensively managed livestock area. This will aid in improving the results of infectious disease models in these areas. In contrast to the intensively managed livestock that have previously been modeled, this study has shown that in areas of low livestock density, multiple livestock types often are managed on the same premises. Direct contacts, facilitated through the planned movement of animals, appear to have a greater seasonality in extensively managed areas as compared to intensively managed areas. Furthermore, wildlife contacts are likely and of potential importance. The results of this study add to the knowledge base used to model the spread of infectious disease in extensively managed livestock populations. Seasonal changes in animal densities and contact rates may impact the results of the models. Additionally, the effect of multiple livestock types on premises should be considered when the expected spread of disease is modeled in extensive livestock areas. Advisors/Committee Members: Norby, Bo (advisor), Posey, R. Daniel (committee member), Scott, H. Morgan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: extensively managed livestock; modeling; density; contact rate

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dominguez, B. J. (2009). Characterization of livestock herds in extensive agricultural settings in southwest Texas. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1302

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dominguez, Brandon James. “Characterization of livestock herds in extensive agricultural settings in southwest Texas.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1302.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dominguez, Brandon James. “Characterization of livestock herds in extensive agricultural settings in southwest Texas.” 2009. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Dominguez BJ. Characterization of livestock herds in extensive agricultural settings in southwest Texas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1302.

Council of Science Editors:

Dominguez BJ. Characterization of livestock herds in extensive agricultural settings in southwest Texas. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1302

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