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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Pine, Michelle D"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Malone, Erica Renee. Investigating the Role of an Interactive Simulation Model on the Ability to Visualize Concepts Related to Gross Anatomy.

Degree: MS, Visualization, 2016, Texas A&M University

Currently many different types of visual aids are available for teaching and studying gross anatomy: illustrations, cadavers, static physical models, plastinated models, and dissection videos are a few examples. These visual aids may be used to identify structures and, in some cases, to facilitate understanding of the spatial relationships amongst structures. However, knowing the identity and location of a structure is only a portion of the content that should be mastered in a gross anatomy course. A knowledge of the basic functions of structures is crucial to understanding anatomy and is often only explained verbally or in text. One major function that current teaching and learning tools leave to the imagination is that of skeletal muscle – the concept of movement. One possible solution to address this oversight is the creation of a kinetic, interactive model that demonstrates movement. In order to create the optimum teaching and learning tool, creation of this type of model should incorporate aspects of many different disciplines and should facilitate student learning by providing engaging and intuitive interaction. To demonstrate the effects on incorporating such a tool into anatomy education, a physical based interactive kinetic simulation model of the canine pelvic limb was constructed. Undergraduate students enrolled in the Biomedical Anatomy course at Texas A&M University were separated into two groups based on their lab section, one of which was allowed to use the model while the other was not. Positive student feedback as well as improved quiz scores show that the interactive simulation model had a positive effect on student comprehension in anatomy education. Advisors/Committee Members: Seo, Jinsil H (advisor), Pine, Michelle D (advisor), McLaughlin, Tim (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Anatomy; Education; Interactive Model; Kinetic; Physical

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Malone, E. R. (2016). Investigating the Role of an Interactive Simulation Model on the Ability to Visualize Concepts Related to Gross Anatomy. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157768

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Malone, Erica Renee. “Investigating the Role of an Interactive Simulation Model on the Ability to Visualize Concepts Related to Gross Anatomy.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157768.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Malone, Erica Renee. “Investigating the Role of an Interactive Simulation Model on the Ability to Visualize Concepts Related to Gross Anatomy.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Malone ER. Investigating the Role of an Interactive Simulation Model on the Ability to Visualize Concepts Related to Gross Anatomy. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157768.

Council of Science Editors:

Malone ER. Investigating the Role of an Interactive Simulation Model on the Ability to Visualize Concepts Related to Gross Anatomy. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157768


Texas A&M University

2. Aguilar, Sonny. Effect of Methylmercury Exposure on Heart and Skeletal Muscle Development in Zebrafish Embryos (Danio Rerio).

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2014, Texas A&M University

Mercury (Hg) in its elemental form is not effectively absorbed into the body until a methyl group is bound to an atom of Hg, creating methylmercury. Methylmercury (MeHg) is then readily absorbed from the digestive tract, and has demonstrated neurotoxic effects in both the developing and mature central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies have shown that exposure to high concentrations of MeHg results in both high morbidity and mortality rates demonstrated by cases of exposure I n the Faroe Islands, Japan and Iraq. Common symptoms exhibited after high exposure to MeHg included sensory disturbances in adults, while children demonstrate anatomical abnormalities and cognitive defects. Recent zebrafish studies have demonstrated decreased hatching rate, movement, and length along with abnormal/disorganized skeletal muscle, and heart related problems. To better understand the neurotoxic mechanisms of MeHg on zebrafish development, we investigated overall embryo growth, various aspects of heart development, and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development. Using zebrafish embryos (ZFEs) as an animal model this study revealed that MeHg exposure for 24 hours had an effect on ZFEs , resulting in decreased heart rate, body length, elicited movement and spontaneous movement, including the number of times ZFEs spontaneously moved during the assessment time of one minute. MeHg exposure in ZFEs had no significant effect on mortality rate, hatching rate, yolk sac area, heart volume ventricle thickness, and pericardial cavity volume, as well as clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and presynaptic vesicle aggregates at the NMJ. This study has confirmed previous reports in the literature that MeHg exposure has adverse effects on the general development of ZFEs. MeHg exposure also had adverse effects on heart development as well as skeletal muscle development, which adversely effected movement. Exposure to 24 hours of low concentrations of MeHg is likely to result in functional deficits that are not reflected in obvious morphologic deficits. Advisors/Committee Members: Abbott, Louise C (advisor), Zoran, Mark J (committee member), Pine, Michelle D (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Louise C. Abbott [email protected]; Mark J. Zoran [email protected]; Michelle D. Pine [email protected]

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aguilar, S. (2014). Effect of Methylmercury Exposure on Heart and Skeletal Muscle Development in Zebrafish Embryos (Danio Rerio). (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153858

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aguilar, Sonny. “Effect of Methylmercury Exposure on Heart and Skeletal Muscle Development in Zebrafish Embryos (Danio Rerio).” 2014. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153858.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aguilar, Sonny. “Effect of Methylmercury Exposure on Heart and Skeletal Muscle Development in Zebrafish Embryos (Danio Rerio).” 2014. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Aguilar S. Effect of Methylmercury Exposure on Heart and Skeletal Muscle Development in Zebrafish Embryos (Danio Rerio). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153858.

Council of Science Editors:

Aguilar S. Effect of Methylmercury Exposure on Heart and Skeletal Muscle Development in Zebrafish Embryos (Danio Rerio). [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153858

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