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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Owen, Erica"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Urbanski, Piotr. Within-Industry Technological Specialization, Collective Action, and Trade Policy.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2015, Texas A&M University

The development of newer and better technologies has reshaped economic markets and will continue to do so in the future. New technologies are widely recognized as a driving force behind economic and political integration. The advent of newer, cheaper telecommunication and transportation methods has eroded social, political and economic barriers between countries. However, little is understood how technological progress has affected market structures and political outcomes–particularly outcomes related to the flow of goods from foreign competitors. This dissertation builds off prior work in many areas. I heavily borrow implications and assumptions from theories of factor mobility, collective action, economies of scale, innovation economics, and international trade. Factor mobility is an important determinant of whether or not actors in my theory care about their smaller group (industry) or their larger group (factor of production). I call the synthesis of these theories “within industry specialization” for the purposes of this dissertation. I argue that fixed costs can be treated as industry specific factor mobility. My idea of within industry specialization is just another type of fixed cost. To measure within industry specialization, I borrow from the economics of innovation. The literature on innovation argues that technological development makes new innovation increasingly harder, in both patents and academia. This means that we can proxy the difficulty/complexity of a field of knowledge by the size of a team necessary to create an innovation as each individual brings a small slice of the knowledge pie. The research question this dissertation ultimately seeks to answer is “when facing foreign competition, why do some industries receive trade protection while others do not?” Advisors/Committee Members: Li, Quan (advisor), Owen, Erica (committee member), McLean, Elena (committee member), Gawande, Kishore (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: technology; specialization; trade policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Urbanski, P. (2015). Within-Industry Technological Specialization, Collective Action, and Trade Policy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154169

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Urbanski, Piotr. “Within-Industry Technological Specialization, Collective Action, and Trade Policy.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154169.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Urbanski, Piotr. “Within-Industry Technological Specialization, Collective Action, and Trade Policy.” 2015. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Urbanski P. Within-Industry Technological Specialization, Collective Action, and Trade Policy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154169.

Council of Science Editors:

Urbanski P. Within-Industry Technological Specialization, Collective Action, and Trade Policy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154169


Texas A&M University

2. Wang, Di. Leviathan as Foreign Investor: Evidence from Sovereign Wealth Funds.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2015, Texas A&M University

How does state ownership affect sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) investment abroad? This dissertation aims to answer this question by providing a general theoretical framework and a detailed deal-level analysis. I argue that two attributes of state ownership affect SWF investment behaviors. First, SWFs face greater discrimination by the host country than do private investors. Since the discrimination is heightened when the home and host countries have poor political relations, SWFs are more likely to invest in host countries with which they have better political relations. Furthermore, SWFs are likely to partner with other investors in order to mitigate the discrimination by the host country. Second, state ownership leads SWFs to be more risk-tolerant than private investors. The observable implication is that SWFs are less likely to be deterred than are private investors by institutional distance between the home and host countries when investing abroad. I also argue that even though state ownership may motivate SWFs to pursue strategic interests on behalf of the home government, different governments often have different strategic objectives. This suggests that SWFs may behave differently even when investing in strategic industries. To illustrate this point, I investigate the energy industry and argue that SWFs from energy-poor countries are more likely to invest in the energy industry compared to other types of investors in pursuit of energy security for the home country. However, foreign investment in the energy industry is likely to face more resistance by the host country than investment in other industries. This resistance would increase with the deterioration of bilateral relations, especially for SWFs from energy-poor countries. To test these claims, I construct a unique dataset from several sources. My analysis covers more than 7,000 foreign acquisitions between 1981 and 2012. Using various model specifications, I find consistent evidence to support my main arguments. This dissertation contributes to the SWF studies as well as several relevant literatures. My interdisciplinary approach integrates theoretical arguments from international relations with existing international business literature. By examining the effect of state ownership on foreign investment, this dissertation enhances our understanding of the recent rise of state capitalism. Advisors/Committee Members: Quan, Quan (advisor), Eden, Lorraine (committee member), Jo, Hyeran (committee member), Owen, Erica (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sovereign Wealth Funds; State Ownership; Foreign Investment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wang, D. (2015). Leviathan as Foreign Investor: Evidence from Sovereign Wealth Funds. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155188

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Di. “Leviathan as Foreign Investor: Evidence from Sovereign Wealth Funds.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155188.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Di. “Leviathan as Foreign Investor: Evidence from Sovereign Wealth Funds.” 2015. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Wang D. Leviathan as Foreign Investor: Evidence from Sovereign Wealth Funds. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155188.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang D. Leviathan as Foreign Investor: Evidence from Sovereign Wealth Funds. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155188


Texas A&M University

3. Webb, Clayton McLaughlin. Domestic Consequences of Economic Sanctions.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2015, Texas A&M University

Are economic sanctions costly for the sanctioning state? Some scholars argue that sanctions are costly tools used to achieve foreign policy goals, while others argue that sanctions are relatively costless tools leaders use to generate domestic political support. These arguments cannot be true at the same time. This dissertation examines this contradiction and evaluates the costs of sanctions at the national, firm, and individual levels of analysis. Economic sanctions have domestic economic and political consequences. Economic sanctions interrupt otherwise profitable commercial activities. These interventions create winners and losers. Like other forms of economic intervention, winners will support the use of sanctions and losers will oppose them. But the consequences of sanctions can be difficult to predict. Sanctions are heterogenous and have heterogenous effects. Sanctions don't lead to major changes in sender trade volumes or unemployment levels because the costs of sanctions are not evenly distributed throughout senders' economies. Economic sanctions are only costly for firms that have commercial interests in targeted states. On average, sanctions are economically costly and politically unpopular, but there are exceptions. How the public responds to sanctions depends on the features of the individual episodes. I use a variety of time series techniques and a laboratory experiment to test these arguments. The results from this dissertation suggest a need to rethink the way sanctions scholars conceptualize the economic and political costs of sanctions for the sanctioning state. Advisors/Committee Members: Li, Quan (advisor), Geva, Nehemia (committee member), Mitchell, Sara (committee member), Mu, Ren (committee member), Owen, Erica (committee member), Wood, B. Dan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Economic Sanctions; International Political Economy, Foreign Policy, Presidential Approval; ARCH; GARCH; VAR

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Webb, C. M. (2015). Domestic Consequences of Economic Sanctions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155228

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Webb, Clayton McLaughlin. “Domestic Consequences of Economic Sanctions.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155228.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Webb, Clayton McLaughlin. “Domestic Consequences of Economic Sanctions.” 2015. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Webb CM. Domestic Consequences of Economic Sanctions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155228.

Council of Science Editors:

Webb CM. Domestic Consequences of Economic Sanctions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155228

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