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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Murphy, Karen L."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Mendoza Diaz, Noemi Veronica. Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University.

Degree: 2009, Texas A&M University

The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the consequences and concerns with the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University (TAMU). Internet2 is a university-led effort to develop advanced network applications and the network technologies needed to support them. Internet2 adoption at TAMU took place towards the end of the 90s decade with the inclusion of the university in the University Corporation for the Advanced Internet Development (UCAID). This dissertation reviewed the Internet development and its relationship to universities. There were two theoretical models of change used, Diffusion of Innovations and Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM). Specifically, ?the consequences of change? was the focus in the Diffusion model, and ?the stages of concern? was the focus in CBAM. This study used qualitative methods of inquiry with three sources of information  – interviews, observations and archival information (printed and online). Seventeen participants were interviewed during the spring of 2006, selected on the basis of convenience, homogeneous, and snowball sampling. The participants were placed in an area, or an intersection of areas, of a diagram with teaching, research, and support-services realms. Through qualitative analytic induction, emerged twenty categories arranged in five different themes: (1) Texas A&M?s use of Internet2, (2) the dilemma of the information sharing, (3) the influences of Internet2, (4) Internet2 discussion, (5) Internet2 concerns. Internet2?s creation and Texas A&M University?s adoption rationale emerged through the narrative analysis. This study matched partially the frameworks of Rogers and Hall and Hord because a pre-stage of unawareness was necessary to install since Internet2 resulted to be extensively used at Texas A&M University, but with most of the users not aware of it. The audit trail, peer-debriefing, and member checks were the mechanisms installed to guarantee trustworthiness. Qualitative analytic induction and narrative analysis were the research strategies and the report was presented in the manner of a case study and summary of findings. Advisors/Committee Members: Dooley, Kim E. (advisor), Dooley, Larry M. (advisor), Magnussen, Walter R. (committee member), Murphy, Karen L. (committee member), Zent, Rodney L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Human Resource Development; Educational Technology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mendoza Diaz, N. V. (2009). Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1101

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mendoza Diaz, Noemi Veronica. “Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University.” 2009. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1101.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mendoza Diaz, Noemi Veronica. “Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University.” 2009. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mendoza Diaz NV. Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1101.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mendoza Diaz NV. Perceived consequences and concerns in the diffusion of Internet2 at Texas A&M University. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1101

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Fite, Shannon Diane. Influences on learner-learner interaction in online classes.

Degree: 2004, Texas A&M University

Interaction, particularly learner-learner interaction, needs to be cultivated in online classes in order for students to have a satisfying learning experience. This study considered two graduate level online classes in an effort to determine: 1) is cognitive style related to the quantity of learner-learner interaction in online courses, 2) is there a relationship between learner characteristics and learner posting preferences in learner-learner interaction in online courses, 3) how do selected learners differ in their use of interaction elements during online discussion, and 4) how do selected learners perceive their experiences in online courses. Using the Student Demographic Questionnaire, the Group Embedded Figures Test, the Text Analysis Tool, and an Interview Protocol developed by the researcher, the study was conducted with a mixed method design. Learner-learner interaction was considered in terms of the students' contributions to the FirstClass discussion activities that were completed as part of the course requirements. This study found that: a) there is not a correlation between cognitive style and quantity of learner-learner interaction, b) some learner characteristics do influence learner posting preferences, c) interaction elements during online discussion do not indicate the content of discussion, but do somewhat indicate how the discussion is taking place, and d) students have opinions on how their experiences in online courses should impact online course design, particularly in terms of knowing the learner and communication. Knowing the learner was discussed in terms of time management, motivation, and differences among learners. Communication was discussed in terms of spontaneity, isolation, freedom, and accountability. Course design was discussed in terms of flexibility, organization, accountability, and technology. The results of this study have implications regarding online course design and recommendations for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Murphy, Karen L. (advisor), Knight, Stephanie L. (advisor), Denton, Jon J. (committee member), Clark, M. Carolyn (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: online courses; learner-learner interaction; computer-mediated communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fite, S. D. (2004). Influences on learner-learner interaction in online classes. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/264

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fite, Shannon Diane. “Influences on learner-learner interaction in online classes.” 2004. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/264.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fite, Shannon Diane. “Influences on learner-learner interaction in online classes.” 2004. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Fite SD. Influences on learner-learner interaction in online classes. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/264.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fite SD. Influences on learner-learner interaction in online classes. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/264

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

3. Chen, Chun-Ying. Managing perceptions of information overload in computer-mediated communication.

Degree: 2005, Texas A&M University

Many studies report information overload (IO) as one of the main problems students encounter in computer-mediated communication (CMC). To date, researchers have paid little attention to the problem of IO?more specifically, to its impact on students? quality interaction?in educational CMC. In an attempt to fill that gap, the purposes of this study were as follows: (a) to understand the difficulties students encounter that contribute to their perceptions of IO in CMC, (b) to observe the impact of those difficulties on students? learning in online discussions, and (c) to identify students? strategies for avoiding or managing those difficulties in order to engage in quality learning. Interviews with students and computer conferencing transcripts were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Interviews with 10 graduate students near the beginning of the semester revealed that although students were exposed to the same amount of information in the same learning environments, different individuals experienced different degrees of IO. Varied learner characteristics caused some students to be more susceptible to IO than others. The difficulties students encountered that contributed to their perceptions of IO included connection problems, navigation difficulties, discomfort with online communication, numerous ongoing discussion messages and endless resources, difficulty in organizing learning, and problems understanding the assigned readings. Those difficulties tended not to affect students? deep processing as observed in their discussion messages, but might influence students? online interaction with others. Students engaging in quality learning in online discussions were interviewed near the end of the semester to investigate their learning strategies. The results indicated that students used a variety of strategies to deal with those difficulties. Those strategies were related to online class preparation, identifying relevant information, processing online information and printed materials, keeping learning on track, organizing learning, and avoiding internal and external distractions. The results of this study have implications for course design. Advisors/Committee Members: Murphy, Karen L. (advisor), Pedersen, Susan (advisor), Clark, M. Carolyn (committee member), Hall, Robert J. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Information Overload; Computer-Mediated Communication; Computer Conferencing; Online Courses; Online Discussions; Learning Strategies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, C. (2005). Managing perceptions of information overload in computer-mediated communication. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1370

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Chun-Ying. “Managing perceptions of information overload in computer-mediated communication.” 2005. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1370.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Chun-Ying. “Managing perceptions of information overload in computer-mediated communication.” 2005. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen C. Managing perceptions of information overload in computer-mediated communication. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1370.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chen C. Managing perceptions of information overload in computer-mediated communication. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1370

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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