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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Moroney, John R."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Reza, Rostami Ravari. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells.

Degree: MS, Petroleum Engineering, 2004, Texas A&M University

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing from a gas condensate reservoir. Questions were raised about whether flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. In the most recent work done by Adedeji Ayoola Adeyeye, this subject was studied when the effects of reservoir depletion were minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. He also used an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture along with a linear model as an adequate analogy. He concluded that the skin due to liquid build-up is not enough to prevent lower flowing bottomhole pressures from producing more gas. This current study investigated the condensate damage at the face of the hydraulic fracture in transient and boundary dominated periods when the effects of reservoir depletion are taken into account. As a first step, simulation of liquid flow into the fracture was performed using a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture. Advisors/Committee Members: Schechter, David S. (advisor), Wattenbarger, Robert A. (advisor), Moroney, John R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: gas condensate; condensate damage; condensate; condensate damage in hydraulically fractured well

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reza, R. R. (2004). Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1100

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reza, Rostami Ravari. “Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1100.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reza, Rostami Ravari. “Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells.” 2004. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Reza RR. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1100.

Council of Science Editors:

Reza RR. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1100


Texas A&M University

2. Brightwell, David Aaron. Essays on U.S. energy markets.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2009, Texas A&M University

This dissertation examines three facets of U.S. energy use and policy. First, I examine the Gulf Coast petroleum refining industry to determine the structure of the industry. Using the duality between cost-minimization and production functions, I estimate the demand for labor to determine the underlying production function. The results indicate that refineries have become more capital intensive due to the relative price increase of labor. The industry has consolidated in response to higher labor costs and costs of environmental compliance. Next, I examine oil production in the United States. An empirical model based on the theoretical framework of Pindyck is used to estimate production. This model differs from previous research by using state level data rather than national level data. The results indicate that the production elasticity with respect to reserves and the price elasticity of supply are both inelastic in the long run. The implication of these findings is that policies designed to increase domestic production through subsidies, tax breaks, or royalty reductions will likely provide little additional oil. We simulate production under three scenarios. In the most extreme scenario, prices double between 2005 and 2030 while reserves increase by 50%. Under this scenario, oil production in 2030 is approximately the same as the 2005 level. The third essay estimates demand for fossil fuels in the U.S. and uses these estimates to forecast CO2 emissions. The results indicate that there is almost no substitution from one fossil fuel to another and that all three fossil fuels are inelastic in the long run. Additionally, all three fuels respond differently to changes in GDP. The result of the differing elasticities with respect to GDP is that the energy mix has changed over time. The implication for forecasting CO2 emissions is that models that cannot distinguish changes in the energy mix are not effective in forecasting CO2 emissions. Advisors/Committee Members: Moroney, John R. (advisor), Anderson, Richard K. (committee member), Puller, Steven L (committee member), Woodward, Richard T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Energy; Oil Supply; Energy Demand; Carbon Dioxide Emissions; Petroleum Refining

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brightwell, D. A. (2009). Essays on U.S. energy markets. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2928

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brightwell, David Aaron. “Essays on U.S. energy markets.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2928.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brightwell, David Aaron. “Essays on U.S. energy markets.” 2009. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Brightwell DA. Essays on U.S. energy markets. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2928.

Council of Science Editors:

Brightwell DA. Essays on U.S. energy markets. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2928


Texas A&M University

3. Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath Dhananjaya Bandara. International black tea market integration and price discovery.

Degree: MS, Agricultural Economics, 2004, Texas A&M University

In this thesis we study three basic issues related to international black tea markets: Are black tea markets integrated? Where is the price of black tea discovered? Are there leaders and followers in black tea markets? We use two statistical techniques as engines of analysis. First, we use time series methods to capture regularities in time lags among price series. Second, we use directed acyclic graphs to discover how surprises (innovations) in prices from each market are communicated to other markets in contemporaneous time. Weekly time series data on black tea prices from seven markets around the world are studied using time series methods. The study follows two paths. We study these prices in a common currency, the US dollar. We also study prices in each country's local currency. Results from unit root tests suggest that prices from three Indian markets are not generated through random walk-like behavior. We conclude that the Indian markets are not weak form efficient. However, prices from all non-Indian markets cannot be distinguished from random walk-like behavior. These latter markets are weak form efficient. Further analysis on these latter markets is conducted to determine whether information among the markets is shared. Vector Autoregressions (VARs) on the non-Indian markets are studied using directed acyclic graphs, impulse response functions and forecast error decomposition analyses. In both local currencies and dollar-converted series, the Sri Lankan and Indonesian markets are price leaders in contemporaneous time. Kenya is an information sink. It is endogenous in current time. Malawi is an exogenous price leader in dollar terms, but it is endogenous in local currency in contemporaneous time. In the long run, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Malawi are price leaders in US dollar terms. In local currency series, Indonesia, Kenya and Malawi are price leaders in the long run. We use Theil's U-statistic to test the forecasting ability of the VAR models. We find for most markets in either dollars or on local currencies that a random walk forecast outperforms the VAR generated forecasts. This last result suggests the non-Indian markets are both weak form and semi-strong form efficient. Advisors/Committee Members: Bessler, David A. (advisor), Moroney, John R. (committee member), Love, H. Alan (committee member), Leatham, David J. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Market integration & efficiency; Directed Acyclic Graphs; Price discovery; Time series analysis; Black Tea market

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dharmasena, K. A. S. D. B. (2004). International black tea market integration and price discovery. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/273

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath Dhananjaya Bandara. “International black tea market integration and price discovery.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/273.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath Dhananjaya Bandara. “International black tea market integration and price discovery.” 2004. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Dharmasena KASDB. International black tea market integration and price discovery. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/273.

Council of Science Editors:

Dharmasena KASDB. International black tea market integration and price discovery. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/273

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