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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Miller, J. Creighton, Jr."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Moran Maradiaga, Jorge Luis. Quantitative trait loci affecting the agronomic performance of a Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench recombinant inbred restorer line population.

Degree: PhD, Plant Breeding, 2004, Texas A&M University

Lately the rate of genetic gain in most agronomic crop species has been reduced due to several factors that limit breeding efficiency and genetic gain. New genetic tools and more powerful statistical analyses provide an alternative approach to enhance genetic improvements through the identification of molecular markers linked to genomic regions or QTLs controlling quantitative traits. The main objective of this research was to identify genomic regions associated with enhanced agronomic performance in lines per se and hybrid combination in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. A population composed of 187 F5:6 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) was derived from the cross of restorer lines RTx430 and RTx7000. Also, a testcross hybrid population (TCH) was developed by using each RIL as a pollinator onto ATx2752. A linkage map was constructed using 174 marker loci generated from AFLP and SSR primer combinations. These markers were assigned to 12 different linkage groups. The linkage map covers 1573 cM with marker loci spaced at an averaged 9.04 cM. In this study, 89 QTL that control variation in seven different morphological traits were identified in the recombinant inbred line population, while in the testcross hybrid population, 79 QTL were identified. These traits included grain yield, plant height, days to mid-anthesis, panicle number, panicle length, panicle exsertion and panicle weight. These putative QTL explained from 4 to 42% of the phenotypic variation observed for each trait. Many of the QTL were not consistent across populations and across environments. Nevertheless, a few key QTL were identified and the source of the positive additive genetics isolated. RTx7000 was consistently associated with better agronomic performance in RIL, while in testcrosses, RTx430 was. Some genomic regions from RTx7000 may be utilized to improve RTx430 as a line per se. However, it is very unlikely that such regions will have a positive effect on the combining ability of RTx430 since testcross results did not reveal any transgressive segregants from the RIL population. Advisors/Committee Members: Rooney, William (advisor), Klein, Robert (committee member), Betran, Javier (committee member), Miller, J. Creighton, Jr. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: QTL Mapping; Sorghum; Agronomic Performance; RIL; Heritability; AFLP; SSR

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moran Maradiaga, J. L. (2004). Quantitative trait loci affecting the agronomic performance of a Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench recombinant inbred restorer line population. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/465

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moran Maradiaga, Jorge Luis. “Quantitative trait loci affecting the agronomic performance of a Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench recombinant inbred restorer line population.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/465.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moran Maradiaga, Jorge Luis. “Quantitative trait loci affecting the agronomic performance of a Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench recombinant inbred restorer line population.” 2004. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Moran Maradiaga JL. Quantitative trait loci affecting the agronomic performance of a Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench recombinant inbred restorer line population. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2004. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/465.

Council of Science Editors:

Moran Maradiaga JL. Quantitative trait loci affecting the agronomic performance of a Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench recombinant inbred restorer line population. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/465


Texas A&M University

2. Blessington, Tyann. The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

Degree: MS, Horticulture, 2005, Texas A&M University

Past research conducted by our lab demonstrated that potatoes contain significant levels of phytochemicals important to human health. However, since potatoes are not consumed raw, it is important to determine the effects of processing on these levels. Therefore, the changes in carotenoid content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic content were investigated using combinations of cultivars, cooking methods, storage treatments, and low-dose ionizing irradiation. Carotenoid content was measured via absorbance at 445 nm, 450 nm, and HPLC identification. Antioxidant activity was measured initially and at stabilization via the DPPH method and phenolic content was measured via the Folin method and HPLC identification. Microwaved, baked, fried, and raw potato samples contained more carotenoids than boiled samples. The samples microwaved, baked, and fried contained higher antioxidant activity and phenolics than the boiled or raw samples. However, the compound quercetin dihydrate appeared to decrease with cooking. Carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics appeared to decrease with storage; however, high storage temperatures and long storage times were believed to cause a dehydration and concentration of compounds, which caused levels to be equal to or greater than before storage. However, this decreasing trend was not linear and there were multiple significant interactions. The compound chlorogenic acid appeared to be quite sensitive to high temperature storage. Irradiation dose appeared to have only a minor, if any, effect on carotenoid levels. The interaction between storage time and irradiation dose was very influential on antioxidant activity. In early stages of storage, higher doses of irradiation had greater antioxidant activity, while, with continued storage, low doses had higher antioxidant activity. Exposure to irradiation appeared to cause an increase in phenolic content, determined by the Folin method. There may be a stimulation, induction, or release of some compounds due to processing; however, its magnitude is not believed to be as great as genetic control. The effects of processing can not be denied and should continue to be investigated. Future studies investigating the health properties of fruits and vegetables, particularly potatoes should include processing effects. Advisors/Committee Members: Miller, J. Creighton, Jr. (advisor), Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis (committee member), Richter, Ronald (committee member), Vestal, Tom A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Potato; Cooking; Storage; Irradiation; Antioxidant; Carotenoid; Phenolic; Postharvest

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APA (6th Edition):

Blessington, T. (2005). The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2589

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Blessington, Tyann. “The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).” 2005. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2589.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Blessington, Tyann. “The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).” 2005. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Blessington T. The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2589.

Council of Science Editors:

Blessington T. The effects of cooking, storage, and ionizing irradiation on carotenoids, antioxidant activity, and phenolics in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2589


Texas A&M University

3. Hale, Anna Louise. Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis.

Degree: PhD, Genetics, 2005, Texas A&M University

Total antioxidant activity and total carotenoid levels were evaluated for more than 100 common potato (Solanum tuberosum, L.) cultivars grown in the United States, advanced breeding lines from several Western U.S. breeding programs, and 47 related, tuber-bearing species. An initial assessment of variability for antioxidant activity provided baseline information to be used for potential potato promotion and for the development of new varieties with greater human health benefits. Wide variability in antioxidant levels provided evidence of genetic control of this trait, indicating that it could be possible to breed for enhanced levels of antioxidant compounds in potato. Accessions, varieties, and advanced breeding lines identified in the broad screen as having high antioxidant activity and high total carotenoid levels, were fine screened via HPLC to determine specific phenolic and carotenoid compounds present in potato. The objective of the study was to identify parents for use in the Texas breeding program to develop potato varieties containing increased levels antioxidant compounds. In the broad screen for total antioxidant activity, the 47 related, tuber-bearing species showed a wider range of variability than the cultivated varieties and breeding lines. Based on the DPPH assay, antioxidant activity ranged from 103-648 uM trolox equivalents in the cultivated varieties and advanced breeding lines, while that of the wild species was 42-892. HPLC analysis revealed that the phenolic content of the species, and their cultivated counterparts, was primarily composed of caffeic and chlorogenic acids. Other phenolics identified were p-coumaric acid, rutin hydrate, vanillic acid, epicatechin, t-cinnamic acid, gallic acid, and salicylic acid. The highest phenolic content discovered in the accessions was five-fold higher than the highest of the cultivated genotypes. Carotenoid analysis revealed lutein in the accessions, but the yellow-flesh breeding lines were much higher in carotenoids. In addition to the work conducted on antioxidants, an attempt was made to separate intraclonal variants of the potato cultivar Russet Norkotah. Eleven microsatellite primers and 112 AFLP primer combinations failed to produce any reproducible polymorphisms. The inability to detect differences between the clones could be due to the tetraploid nature of the clones or epigenetic differences not detected by the procedures utilized in this study. Advisors/Committee Members: Miller, J. Creighton, Jr. (advisor), Giovannoni, James J. (committee member), Hart, Jeffrey D. (committee member), Lineberger, R. Daniel (committee member), King, Stephen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: potato; S. tuberosum; Russet Norkotah; antioxidants; carotenoids; AFLP; microsatellite

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hale, A. L. (2005). Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1602

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hale, Anna Louise. “Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1602.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hale, Anna Louise. “Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis.” 2005. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Hale AL. Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1602.

Council of Science Editors:

Hale AL. Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/1602

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