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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Lueck, Jennifer"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Jiang, Shaohai. Promoting Online Patient-Provider Communication in China: An Internet-based Intervention.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2017, Texas A&M University

The Chinese health care system has suffered from severe tension between patients and doctors during the past decade. Violence towards health care providers has become a familiar occurrence in China. Faced with the increasing number of deaths and injuries of health care providers from angry health care consumers, Chinese scholars have made great efforts to explore possible ways to improve doctor-patient relationships. Study 1 of the dissertation conducted a cross-sectional survey among 758 Chinese patients to examine pathways through which patient-centered communication (e.g., degree to which doctors are perceived as informative, supportive, and helpful making medical decisions) could influence patient satisfaction and patient trust, variables that could then contribute to better patient-reported health outcomes. The findings showed that patient-centered communication significantly increased patient satisfaction and patient trust. Patient satisfaction in turn significantly improved three types of health outcomes (general, emotional, and physical), and patient trust significantly enhanced emotional health. Bootstrap analyses provided support for the mediation effects of satisfaction and trust. While improving patient satisfaction and patient trust holds enormous potential to mitigate the conflicting doctor-patient relationship in China, another important contributing factor to the crises in the health care system is the difficulties many Chinese patients are facing in receiving affordable health care. Online patient-provider communication may bring a new option for the delivery of affordable health services in a timely way. However, online patient-provider communication is still a relatively new concept to Chinese patients. Thus, to promote this new but important practice, study 2 of the dissertation conducted a four-week blog-based intervention among Chinese patients aged 40 or above. With the randomized control trial design and a general basis of the Social Cognitive Theory, this intervention was effective in promoting online patient-provider communication. Specifically, the findings indicated that this intervention resulted in improvements in the frequency of participants’ online patient-provider communication and related psychosocial constructs from Social Cognitive Theory (e.g., self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and awareness). Advisors/Committee Members: Street, Richard (advisor), Goidel, Kirby (committee member), Lueck, Jennifer (committee member), Kwok, Oi-man (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Patient-provider communication; Internet-based intervention; Social cognitive theory; China

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jiang, S. (2017). Promoting Online Patient-Provider Communication in China: An Internet-based Intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161365

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jiang, Shaohai. “Promoting Online Patient-Provider Communication in China: An Internet-based Intervention.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161365.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jiang, Shaohai. “Promoting Online Patient-Provider Communication in China: An Internet-based Intervention.” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Jiang S. Promoting Online Patient-Provider Communication in China: An Internet-based Intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161365.

Council of Science Editors:

Jiang S. Promoting Online Patient-Provider Communication in China: An Internet-based Intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161365

2. Chen, Hongliang. Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2017, Texas A&M University

The current study tests the third-person effect (TPE) in the context of Internet privacy. TPE refers to the phenomenon that people tend to perceive greater media effects on others than on themselves. The behavioral component of TPE holds that the self-others perceptual gap is positively associated with support for restricting harmful media messages. Using a sample (N=613) from Amazon Mturk, the current research documented firm support for the perceptual and behavioral components of TPE in the context of Internet privacy. Moreover, social distance, perceived Internet privacy knowledge, negative online privacy experiences, and Internet use were found to be significant predictors of the TPE perceptions of Internet privacy risks. There are four novel contributions of the current study. First, this study systematically tests TPE in a new context―Internet privacy. Second, this study examines five antecedents of TPE perceptions, of which perceived Internet privacy knowledge, negative online privacy experiences, and Internet use are novel to TPE studies. Unlike prior studies which assume social distance and desirability of media content, the current study provides direct empirical tests of these two antecedents. Third, prior research primarily examines support for censorship of harmful media messages, a context in which individuals do not have control over policy enforcement. In the case of Internet privacy, people can decide whether to adopt privacy protective measures or not. The current study addresses two types of behavioral intentions to reduce privacy risks: (1) the willingness to adopt online privacy protection measures; and (2) recommend such measures to others. Fourth, unlike prior studies using fear based theories to investigate Internet privacy issues, the current tests Internet privacy from a novel perspective—TPE theory. Advisors/Committee Members: Goidel, Robert K (advisor), Street, Richard L (committee member), Lueck, Jennifer (committee member), Yoon, Myeongsun (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Third person effect; Internet privacy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, H. (2017). Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Hongliang. “Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Hongliang. “Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks.” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Chen H. Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen H. Third Person Effect and Internet Privacy Risks. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165727

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