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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Jordan, Ellen"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Balinas, Melanie Elizabeth. A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center.

Degree: MS, Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications, 2014, Texas A&M University

The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to evaluate dairy farmers’ adoption characteristics and use of a Milk Collection Center (MCC) in the Western province of Rwanda. A snowball sampling method was used to identify participants (N = 53). Farmers answered a research instrument related to their use and perception of the MCC and potential price points for educational services including, artificial insemination training, mastitis treatments, vaccinations at the MCC, training in milking techniques, on-site veterinarian services, and milk quality testing. The study showed that Rwandan dairy farmers had agreeable attitudes toward the Gisenyi MCC and were influenced by distance to MCC, access to credit, and low cost of technologies. No significant relationships existed between farmers’ adopter categories (early vs. late) and their overall attitude toward the MCC. However, relationships existed between individual adopter characteristics and overall attitude toward the MCC. Farmers were willing to pay for certain educational services, such as artificial insemination training and mastitis treatments. Vaccinations at the MCC and artificial insemination training were farmers’ highest valued services. Positive relationships existed between price points and importance of educational services. The MCCs must appeal to their target client, the dairy farmer, and listen to their wants and needs to be successful and have an impact. By drawing attention to the positive attributes of the MCC, participation increases amongst the farmers wouldbenefit the MCC and the Rwandan dairy market, in addition to helping dairy farmers have a more stable market to sell their product and receive the assistance needed. Advisors/Committee Members: Wingenbach, Gary (advisor), Rutherford, Tracy (committee member), Jordan, Ellen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Dairy; Rwanda; Adoption of Technology; Education; Extension Services

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Balinas, M. E. (2014). A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/152460

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Balinas, Melanie Elizabeth. “A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/152460.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Balinas, Melanie Elizabeth. “A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center.” 2014. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Balinas ME. A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/152460.

Council of Science Editors:

Balinas ME. A Program Evaluation of a Rwandan Milk Collection Center. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/152460


Texas A&M University

2. Strickland, Summer J. Effects of seasonal heat stress on the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Texas dairy cattle.

Degree: MS, Epidemiology, 2005, Texas A&M University

The validity of Johne??s disease herd status programs and on-farm disease control programs that rely on established ??cutpoints?? (e.g., S/P ratios) for ELISA serological tests such as the HerdChek?? (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, Maine) may be susceptible to varied seasonal test accuracy. An observed depression in the proportion of a large central Texas dairy herd classified as ??positive?? during the months of July and August led to our investigation. We hypothesized that there exists a seasonal variability in serological response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that is directly related to heat stress. We further hypothesized that a reciprocal response may occur during periods of heat stress that results in a greater risk of fecal shedding in subclinically-infected animals. Starting in October 2002, we invoked a testing regime that included multiple testing of 720 individual adult cows over each of four seasons including spring, summer, fall, and winter. We collected serum on a cyclic, monthly basis from three random groupings of cows, and, based on the ELISA results, collected fecal samples from the 20% of cows with the highest S/P ratios. We continued to sample in this manner for the period of one year and at the end of that period, analyzed the serum en masse. The ELISA outcome values were treated both as categorical and continuous variables (e.g., S/P ratio). The potential lagged effects of heat stress on S/P ratio, as well as the potential for a change in test result (negative to positive or vice versa) due to heat stress were assessed. The results for fecal culture were analyzed on a categorical scale and were compared to the ELISA results to explore the possibility of a reciprocal response. In the present study, we did not observe any of the significant seasonal effects of heat stress on S/P ratios and proportion seropositive to MAP that were observed in the historical (and less valid) cross-sectional time-series data conducted in 2001. In addition, we found no evidence to support a hypothesis linking seasonal heat stress to the risk of fecal culture positivity for the causative bacterium for Johne??s disease. Advisors/Committee Members: Scott, H. Morgan (advisor), Roussel, Allen (committee member), Jordan, Ellen (committee member), Libal, Melissa (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: paratuberculosis; Johne's disease; heat stress; dairy cattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Strickland, S. J. (2005). Effects of seasonal heat stress on the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Texas dairy cattle. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2728

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Strickland, Summer J. “Effects of seasonal heat stress on the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Texas dairy cattle.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2728.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Strickland, Summer J. “Effects of seasonal heat stress on the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Texas dairy cattle.” 2005. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Strickland SJ. Effects of seasonal heat stress on the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Texas dairy cattle. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2728.

Council of Science Editors:

Strickland SJ. Effects of seasonal heat stress on the diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Texas dairy cattle. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2728

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