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You searched for +publisher:"Texas A&M University" +contributor:("Ihrig, Melanie"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Burckhardt, Heather Ann. Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes.

Degree: MS, Laboratory Animal Medicine, 2009, Texas A&M University

Surgical embryo transfer in rodents is a common procedure in today’s research laboratory, although little is known of the effect analgesics may have on not only the recipient female but also the embryos. Two perioperative analgesics, ketoprofen and buprenorphine, were evaluated against a saline control in terms of number of pups born, number of pups weaned, and whether or not a litter was born. Both a uterine approach and an oviduct approach were evaluated. Post-surgical behavior was compared among the three surgical animals in each group, and between the non-surgical analgesic control and its surgical counterpart. Results indicated that ketoprofen and buprenorphine have no effect on the number of pups born, weaned, or litters born when compared to a saline control. Significant differences were found between the non-surgical analgesic control and its surgical counterpart in two behavioral categories; once for ketoprofen (behavior) and once for buprenorphine (physical condition). No other differences were found. Advisors/Committee Members: Ihrig, Melanie M. (advisor), Kier, Ann B. (committee member), Welsh, Jane C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: analgesics; mice; embryo transfer; pain

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burckhardt, H. A. (2009). Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1140

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burckhardt, Heather Ann. “Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1140.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burckhardt, Heather Ann. “Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes.” 2009. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Burckhardt HA. Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1140.

Council of Science Editors:

Burckhardt HA. Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1140


Texas A&M University

2. Sivula, Christine Patricia. Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice.

Degree: MS, Laboratory Animal Medicine, 2009, Texas A&M University

Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial food borne illnesses worldwide. Among the many Salmonella serotypes, Typhimurium is the most commonly implicated serotype in human disease in the United States. A major source of infection for humans is consumption of chicken or egg products that have been contaminated with S. Typhimurium. The breadth of knowledge regarding colonization and persistence factors in the chicken is small when compared to our knowledge of factors that are important for these processes in other species used in Salmonella research, such as cattle and mice. Defining the factors important for these processes in the chick is the first step in decreasing the transmission of Salmonella between animal and human hosts. In this work, we developed a chicken model to identify and study intestinal colonization and persistence factors of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We studied the degree of enteric and systemic colonization of wild type S. Typhimurium ATCC14028, one of the most widely studied Typhimurium isolates, in White Leghorn chicks and in Salmonella-resistant CBA/J mice during infection. Furthermore, we determined the distribution of wild type S. Typhimurium and a SPI-1 mutant (invA) during competitive infection in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and 8-week-old mice. Cell associated, intracellular and luminal distributions of these strains in the cecum were analyzed as total counts in each compartment and also as a competitive index. Localization of S. Typhimurium ATCC14028 and the role of SPI-1 in colonization are well studied in murine models of infection, but comparative infection in chicks with the same strain has not been undertaken previously. We show that the cecal contents are the major site for recovery of S. Typhimurium in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. We also show that while SPI-1 is important for successful infection in the murine model, it is important only for cell association in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks. Finally, we found that in chicks infected at 1 week of age, bacterial counts in the feces do not reflect those seen in the cecum as they do in mice. Advisors/Committee Members: Adams, L. Garry (advisor), Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L. (advisor), Ihrig, Melanie (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Salmonella; cecum; SPI-1; chicks; mice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sivula, C. P. (2009). Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2989

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sivula, Christine Patricia. “Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2989.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sivula, Christine Patricia. “Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice.” 2009. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Sivula CP. Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2989.

Council of Science Editors:

Sivula CP. Comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2989


Texas A&M University

3. Knox, Anna Lavonne. The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas.

Degree: MS, Laboratory Animal Medicine, 2009, Texas A&M University

An epidemiological study of the bacteria Tropheryma whipplei was conducted in the Brazos Valley region of Texas; specifically in the cities of College Station and Bryan. DNA samples from the oral cavities of study participants was extracted and analyzed for the presence of T. whipplei. Previously published studies have reported identifying this bacterium in the saliva of healthy individuals with no signs or symptoms of Whipple’s disease. These investigations were conducted in Europe and Asia, including London, England and Switzerland, but data of this nature had yet to be obtained within Texas. After analyzing 147 samples obtained from 49 individuals, no indication of T. whipplei existing in the oral cavity of Bryan or College Station residents was found. During testing a study was published in May of 2007 indicating that previous investigations of this nature had in fact identified different bacteria resulting in false positives. Advisors/Committee Members: Ihrig, Melanie M. (advisor), Womack, James (advisor), Samuel, James (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Tropheryma whipplei

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knox, A. L. (2009). The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3184

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knox, Anna Lavonne. “The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3184.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knox, Anna Lavonne. “The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas.” 2009. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Knox AL. The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3184.

Council of Science Editors:

Knox AL. The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3184

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